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3

To release 1.0.0-2 you need to use the -U option, see dch man page: --upstream, -U Don't append distro-name1 to the version on a derived distribution. Increment the Debian version. Initial debian/changelog: foo (1.0.0-1) trusty; urgency=medium * Initial release -- Sylvain Pineau <sylvain.pineau@canonical.com> ...


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Instead of building a binary package you indeed need to build a source package and let the launchpad ppa build binaries for you. To create the source.changes file, just issue the following command: dpkg-buildpackage -S From the dpkg-buildpackage man page: -S Specifies a source-only build, no binary packages need to be made. Passed ...


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You will never get updates for manually installed packages, which are not installed by a PPA or by the Ubuntu repositories. You have to download the deb file again and again for each new version. In your case, you have installed the version for Vivid from the officially Ubuntu Launchpad site. If you start a upgrade to Vivid, you will get updates for your ...


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Sounds like you were accidentally in the phone section, clicks are currently for Ubuntu Touch. Click on "Desktop" as shown here: That should get you in the right section, also remember that you won't get e-mail's for notes on the submission, so check the status and feedback areas often.


2

As the manpage says, what-source is a simple wrapper for apt-cache show | grep. The actual code is: #!/bin/sh # [....] # You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License # along with this program. If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>. apt-cache show "$1" | grep "^Filename:" | sed -e "s:\(.*\)/\(.*\)/\(.*\)/\(.*\)/.*:\4:" ...


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On Ubuntu (and Debian), creating a deb package would be the best way to go, as everything can be automated, so that no end-user intervention is needed. The only cases where package installation or upgrades are not automated are if the package has some configuration options that need input from the user (mainly during installation only) or if a configuration ...


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What you're trying to accomplish in Debian is different than in Fedora. Save your deb files where ever you like then use dpkg to install them. dpkg -i /path/file.deb Once installed apt-get install -f should fix any dependancey issues. Don't forget to use sudo on these commands if not root.


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Please avoid modifing system files. Instead you should place an executable script in /etc/profile.d (scripts in here got executed for every user) to change $PATH value. /etc/profile.d/10-<package name>.sh #!/bin/sh export PATH=$PATH:/path/to/executable


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Looks like the simple answer is that Debian packages also have an epoch field. From the policy manual: version fields



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