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4

You'll have to use a LiveDVD/USB to fix this. If you have another computer, download a copy of Ubuntu and burn it to your media of choice. Boot from that LiveMedia on the broken computer. Don't choose install when prompted, choose "Try before installing." You should be greeted with an Ubuntu desktop after some time. Open the file browser, open your hard ...


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The usage of a live CD may not be necessary. The following was not tested, but should work. Try to switch to text-only mode in your login promt by Ctrl-Alt-F1 and try to login. After the correct password, you should receive a message, that you can not change the directory to your home directory and $HOME is set to /. Afterwards, you are able to rename your ...


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Edit: Reading the full e2fsck output, I don't believe that the file system is salvageable. You will need to perform data recovery, format the partition and re-install Ubuntu. From the e2fsck output, it looks like the file system was damaged badly. The super-block is lost but the back-up super-block is still usable. You can try to fix the issue (see later), ...


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Technically speaking, yes it is possible. All installed packages have a *.list file associated with them; these files are lists of all the files that were created upon installation of a package (but that's beside the point, we only need to know the names of the packages themselves to know what's been installed). So what you can do is connect the drive ...


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If you let the Ubuntu installer use the entire disk, then at least your bootloader is messed up with the Linux GRUB best case scenario, however your files may be gone. The easiest way to know for sure would be to use your Ubuntu USB drive and run in live mode, do not attempt to install, then search your HDD for leftover windows directories. If they are ...


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Actually what happens is this, when ever you load new operating system or a file in any memory drive (Hard disk,floppy disk,etc...). Your data will never be deleted(formated), It will be just over-written. It means that the data was replaced with the existing one. Even if you delete your file from recycle-bin, it isn't deleted permanently. Your operating ...


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Boot to a live environment and do this: sudo mount /dev/sdaXY /mnt Change XY to your specification. sudo find /mnt/var/log/ -type f -iname dpkg.log* Here, you will get a list of files such as: dpkg.log dpkg.log.1 dpkg.log.2.gz and so on... Copy those to another folder/drive that you have access to (Also if there are any archives such as ...



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