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21

You could check which package brings ls binary using dpkg: $ dpkg -S /bin/ls coreutils: /bin/ls dpkg will show you that it is package coreutils. Now you only need to reinstall it: $ sudo apt-get install --reinstall coreutils


6

The simplest solution would be to move the files to a different directory. That way, at least your $HOME will load. Open a terminal and run these commands: mkdir jpeg-dir find . -maxdepth 1 -type f -iname '*jpg' -or -iname '*jpeg' -exec mv {} jpeg-dir + That will move all files whose name ends in jpg, jpeg, JPEG, JPG etc, to ~/jpeg-dir. That should let ...


5

What is happening is that the filemanager is creating a list (with ls) and that is going to take a long long time when there are lots of files. So 1st thing to do is to clean up /home/$USER/. Go into console mode. cd ~ mkdir tmp This will create a tmp directory in your /home/$USER/. Now do an ls -l | more and press enter to get an idea about what ...


4

You will need to use a second computer to do the recovery, if you only have one pc, you cannot continue until you find someone with a working pc to help you. Once on a second pc, plug the drive you wish to recover into it via some method (put it into an external USB caddy etc). Once you are in windows of the second pc, and the drive to recover is pluged in ...


2

You do not want to read the files. You need to copy them over to another piece of storage. Easiest method Boot from a live DVD and mount the disk where your documents are on. You can mount this disk from the desktop by clicking on the hard disk icon it correspond. See the hard disk icons at the bottom, when you hover over them they will show the ...


2

In this case I'd simply retrieve all your files from your backups. ;) Overwriting the first few GB of a partition will have wiped out enough of the filesystem's structure that it is unlikely you will be able to retrieve file metadata in a meaningful way. Now, since you did it to the entire drive (/dev/sda) it is possible that you have intact partitions ...


2

I want to keep the OS intact and only clean out the free space No, you don't. Not only is that far more likely that you'll have missed something, it's bucketloads more manual work for you checking every nook and cranny. Nuke the disk from orbit in a filesystem-agnostic way (per Rinwind's comment: 1, 2) from a Live CD. The wipe is going to take time. It ...


2

You have to try some Data Recovery tools which may help you to restore some of your old data. From R-tools Technology: R-Linux is a free data recovery and undelete utility for Ext2FS/3FS (Linux) file systems. File recovery after power failure, system crash, virus infection, or partition reformation, even for the different file system. Unformat and ...


1

When you boot form a LiveUSB, you do not login with your name and password. You have access to your HDD, unless there are restrictions. But if you run sudo nautilus in terminal, file manager will start with root rights, and you will be able to do whatever you want.


1

You can restore your whole tar archive but do it from a Live CD/USB instead. tar will not core dump this time. In either case, once done you need to run update-grub to update grub config file. If you do it from a Live CD/USB you need to chroot into the mounted partition before running update-grub like this: sudo -i mount /dev/sda4 /mnt # you need to ...



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