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15

Yes, dd clones every bit on the drive, including deleted files and free space. You could also look into CloneZilla, which is a user-friendly LiveCD for cloning and restoring disks, though I'm not sure its disk-image format would be compatible with your Windows software. http://clonezilla.org/


7

Hopefully you have a LiveUSB or LiveCD to boot from. In the event that you did end up deleting enough to crash your system, you can boot to a Live media and select "Try Ubuntu". There are some option to "undelete" files with programs like extundelete, photorec, foremost and scalpel. But some of these can become a nightmare to use, especially if you're not ...


5

I Would do this: Change to ROOT mode from a Live CD/USB Preferrably, if not it will still work from a dual-booted Linux install. Open a terminal and type: sudo -i Then, find out which partition is your Windows via this command: fdisk -l Mine shows this: /dev/sda1 * 2048 206847 204800 100M 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT /dev/sda2 206848 ...


4

Stop using the computer so that you don't overwrite any deleted data on the hard drive, and shut it down. Get a LiveUSB, boot from it and install Testdisk. Use Testdisk to try and recover your partitions and files. Copy any important data to another flash drive, not the LiveUSB. Open the Ubuntu installer and install Ubuntu. I have personally used Testdisk ...


3

Here's the VeryEasyWay™ to do this: download the CloneZilla Live CD, boot it follow the device to image manual to do the imaging. store the image of the CloneZilla Live CD together with the image you created in your cloud. (In case a future version of CloneZilla would not be able to restore it) Only to be super-safe: keep the CloneZilla CD and the HDD ...


2

I know 2 reasons to begin with. 1st one is the most likely one. Kernel not loaded the usb storage module. lsmod will show if it is. If not ... sudo modprobe usb_storage to add it. Also can happen when the power supply of the USB is faulty. To investigate more you could do a ... strace -o log fdisk -l and post the results on pastebin (it might ...


2

It's highly unlikely that command went through on a modern Ubuntu without the following: $ rm -rf / /bin/rm: it is dangerous to operate recursively on '/' /bin/rm: use --no-preserve-root to override this failsafe rm would likely continue to remove everything in $HOME which you do have write access to, but the rest of / is probably preserved. The other ...


2

It happens presumably because you tarred the whole public_html directory and its name is in the archive. You can use the --strip-components argument to cut off the head of the path when extracting. In your case: tar -xvzf --strip-components 1 orbit.tar.gz To remove the public_html/ and extract files directly into the current directory. 1 in the above ...


1

When you created /var/www/orbitcode/public_html/orbit.tar.gz you missed the message that told you tar: Removing leading `/' from member names Use tar tf /var/www/orbitcode/public_html/orbit.tar.gz to list the member names. To correct for the current situation (use sudo to taste), cd /var/www/orbitcode/public_html # Assume extracted files must ...


1

You have lost ALL but the last file offered up by find, it is now called ./1. Note that find finds files in its own order, so "last" doesn't mean what you think. By inserting an echo in front of the mv, we see: Script started on Thu 14 Jul 2016 07:02:01 PM EDT +w3@aardvark:~(0)$ mkdir tmp/answer +w3@aardvark:~(0)$ cd !$ cd tmp/answer +w3@aardvark:~/tmp/...


1

First, you have to check whether the flash drive is recognized or not. We do that by using the lsblk command, on terminal. Example: ritesh ~> lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 111.8G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 512M 0 part /boot/efi ├─sda2 8:2 0 107.4G 0 part / └─sda3 8:3 0 3.9G 0 part [SWAP] sdc 8:...


1

did I make a mistake? You overwrote the beginning of drive /dev/sdc with a ISO file. From the last part of your question, it seems it is not what you wanted to do. Hence yes, it was a mistake. A pretty bad one. You should have used /dev/sdc2. How can I get the three partitions system back? As you have determined, you can easily restore the 2nd and ...


1

If you cannot access your files, choose "deeper search" which may take some time, but might be able to locate the proper sectors to recover the partition. Ensure the letter to the right of the partition type is not "D", as this means it's set for deletion. It can be changed to other partition types L,E or P (Logical, Extended, or Primary). Only duplicates ...



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