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3

Boot a live system, install testdisk, launch it, choose "Intel", choose "recover partition".


3

If testdisk couldn't see the file, that means that the filesystem entry containing the references to it has been overwritten already. As for any overwritten file, there's no way to recover such overwritten entry (i.e. there's no way to recover the filename). But if recovering the file content is enough, you can try to use photorec, which will read the ...


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You can use Photorec to recover the images. Run with no arguments and follow instructions, it should guide you step by step sudo photorec I would suggest following the guide here https://help.ubuntu.com/community/DataRecovery#Imaging_a_damaged_device.2C_filesystem_or_drive to image the card before just in case EDIT: Also before you go through the ...


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Do not use the original disk any more! Make a copy of the drive using ddrescue on an identical (or larger) disk sudo apt-get install gddrescue sudo ddrescue --binary-prefixes --cluster-size=64 --sparse --timeout=20s /dev/sdg /dev/sdX /path/to/file.log where /dev/sdg is your disk when you can read the disk, but not its partition table and X is the drive ...


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I see a problem with your commands: /dev/sdg1 in the 1st error. /dev/sdf in the 2nd error. g-io-error-quark, 19 means "Method name you invoked isn’t known by the object you invoked it on." So I would assume your 1st command has an invalid device and it should be /dev/sdf1. Regarding the superblock error: start here and read the link in post 2 So how ...


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But I prefer foremost Install foremost sudo apt-get install foremost Take a look at man foremost to learn how to use foremost. First make an empty writable directory to save recover files in a partition other than that you are going to recover. Then run foremost. I am going to recover my home partition ( let's say /dev/sda5). $ sudo foremost -t ...


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Run ecryptfs-unwrap-passphrase at the terminal screen and write down the output for disaster recovery. type ecryptfs-unwrap-passphrase in the terminal screen it will prompted you with "Passphrase:", it wants your user login password The output will look like this example "1b6acbada5e3a61ebe324a4745e61ba8" the 32 character output is your "passphrase" ...


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You CAN'T unmount the root partition, while it's in use, that's impossible. The only way to give it a try is to boot the LIVE-CD and try to fix it from there. It would be best, if you don't use the system any longer, because the blocks are set to "unused" by the system. The longer you use this system, the bigger the chances are, that you override your data ...


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It is good advice to shutdown, and boot into a live media as soon as possible. if you simply used rm -rf on a directory, then the file data is likely still intact, just the pointer to that location has been removed, or marked with a delete flag. The resource doesn't actually get over wrote until the OS needs to write files to disk, which things with a ...



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