Hot answers tagged

181

I had the same problem. You can fix it manually. Open System Settings > Displays. In the Displays window, you will see an Unknown monitor. Click it and disable it.


42

I would suggest you update your cursor theme and cursor size. First in a terminal type: sudo update-alternatives --config x-cursor-theme Choose the number of the theme you want - e.g. 0 for DMZ-White Changing the value here requires a reboot - a logout and login will not suffice. Secondly, using dconf-editor (install using sudo apt-get install ...


24

In order to get your custom cursor to work with all applications do: Download a cursor theme. Open Gnome Tweak Tool and change the cursor theme. Open a Terminal. Run this command: sudo update-alternatives --config x-cursor-theme Select the number corresponding to your choice Log out. Log back in. You can see a video tutorial on YouTube.


24

You can check this bug https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/gnome-settings-daemon/+bug/1238410 I'm no longer affected on a new 14.04 dev install but on my 13.10 install from 2 weeks prior to release it still could happen For the 13.10 install disabling the gnome-settings-daemon cursor plugin has proved effective. To try, in terminal gsettings set ...


23

Do System Settings > Displays And turn-off / disable Unknown Display.


18

have the same problem afetr upgrading to 15.04 from 14.10. Somtimes the mouse pointer will apear, this happens aprox 1 in 5 computer switch on times. I found a way to get round this as suggested above. sudo service lightdm restart This does have to be issued after every start up . Does anybody know of a more longterm fix ? I have now found a longterm fix. ...


17

Yes, there is a setting hidden in gconf. Open gconf-editor, navigate to /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default, find cursor_blink_mode and change its value to off.


16

Try 'unclutter' the purpose of this program is to hide the pointer after the mouse has not moved for a while. Using it, you can make the pointer appear only when the user touches the screen, and disappear right after it. (maybe this was not exactly what you were aiming for. But it is much easier than your alternative =P) To use, install it sudo apt-get ...


12

unlink /etc/alternatives/x-cursor-theme You may also be interested in update-alternates update-alternatives --config x-cursor-theme


11

If you never want the cursor to appear (appropriate for touchscreens) unclutter won't suffice from my experience. Instead you can use use -nocursor when starting X. Example: startx -nocursor See http://www.x.org/wiki/AdvancedTopicsFAQ/#index1h2


11

You can disable the blinking also from the command line (gconf-editor is not installed by default): gconftool-2 --set /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default/cursor_blink_mode --type string off For newer versions of gnome-terminal, the command has changed: gsettings set org.gnome.Terminal.Legacy.Profile:/org/gnome/terminal/legacy/profiles:/:$(gsettings ...


11

just go to the display settings and turn off sticky edges !


10

I was having a similar problem after switching users. I was able to get the touch pad to work by reloading the kernel module: sudo modprobe -r psmouse sudo modprobe psmouse


9

That is a known issue. To change your cursor globally follow below instruction. Open terminal and paste gksu nautilus hit enter then insert your password hit enter. You will be now viewing nautilus as root. now go to file system on left panel. Navigate to /usr/share/icons/default and open index.theme with your favorite text editor and change DMZ-White to ...


9

In a terminal enter this: gksu gedit /usr/share/icons/default/index.theme Then change DMZ-White with exact name of the theme you want use, in your case DMZ-Black. Then it will show the correct theme.


8

The easiest way to do that is to use the gnome-tweak-tool . It is in the Software Center. But due to some dependencies it will install gnome-shell in addition. When you've installed gnome-tweak-tool, seek for this via dash as "Advanced Settings" With this you can change to your desired themes and perhaps x11-cursor. But for me the alternative x11-cursor ...


8

It is quite easy to change the cursor in Unity. Open a Terminal. Type in these commands: sudo apt-get install gnome-tweak-tool sudo apt-get install oxygen-cursor-theme sudo apt-get install oxygen-cursor-theme-extra Select a new cursor theme from the Tweak Tool. Run this command: sudo update-alternatives --config x-cursor-theme Press Alt+F2, type this ...


8

This is a known bug in compiz see https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/compiz/+bug/141500. A found a workaround that works great for me on the bug page. Create a file Mark it as executable (Right Click > Properties > Permissions > Allow executing file as program) Open in gedit and paste the following #!/bin/bash mkdir -p $HOME/.icons/default ...


8

Try (in a terminal): gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.interface cursor-blink false As your can see the key has been moved to org.gnome.desktop.interface (via GSettings), so you can access it via dconf-editor if you prefer so.


7

you can use sudo update-alternatives --config x-cursor-theme Then choose any theme you like.. to apply either restart or compiz --replace


7

If you prefer GUI you can use unity-tweak-tool. How to: Open Ubuntu Software Center, search for unity-tweak-too and install it. Open unity-tweak-tool. Under Appearance, click on Cursor: Under Preferences enable ☑ Use large cursors: Logout and log back in. Custom Cursor Themes: If you don't like default cursors you can download a nice large cursor ...


7

System Settings > Screen Display. There is an unknown monitor. Disable it, it should be good


7

Go in settings -> Display, and you will probably see two active monitors: disable the one which is unknown and click apply.


7

Maybe its too late for reply, but i faced a problem using this in 12.04. If you download a Cursor theme and extract it to /usr/share/icons/, make sure change its permission to 755: chmod -R 755 cursors/ and change the Cursor theme in /usr/share/icons/default/index.theme to your theme. then apply instruction described by suli8


7

Multi-user 14.04 If you have only one user on your system, it will be ok to change default curser theme, whether by copying DMZ-Black contents onto DMZ-White, or changing default index.theme content, or even using command sudo update-alternatives --config x-cursor-theme. But on a multi-user system, you need to personalize for yourself alone without ...


6

Installing the theme is pretty simple. Simply extract the folder in the archive to ~/.icons (the ~/ represents your home folder, and .icons is a hidden directory). Then, install Ubuntu-Tweak from here: https://launchpad.net/~tualatrix/+archive/next, and use that to change your cursor theme.


6

For gnome-terminal, add this to your ~/.vimrc (to be created if missing): if has("autocmd") au InsertEnter * silent execute "!gconftool-2 --type string --set /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default/cursor_shape ibeam" au InsertLeave * silent execute "!gconftool-2 --type string --set /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default/cursor_shape block" au VimLeave * ...


6

settings - displays - disable unknown display. it works for me


6

As indicated in this very similar question, your best option appears to be using keymon; it is fairly easy to customize it for an effect similar to what you see in your video. 1. Install keymon From the Software Center, or via sudo apt-get install key-mon 2. Make its window minimal and enable the click indicator The default window shows mouse and ...


6

I use VirtualBox (4.2.4r81684) on a Windows 7 host, had ubuntu desktop 12.04 guest, upgraded to 12.10 recently, and experienced this mouse jumping you describe, even after updating guest additions. This helped me out: Long story short: this bug will be fixed eventually. You can either run these commands on EVERY boot (can put into a script in your ...



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