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2

You should use 0 */2 * * * istead of * */2 * * *.


1

It is because cron daemon's activity goes to system logs. It is not annoying in my opinion, rather life saving if - let's say - you have to know if crontab is executed or not. Beside that you can control the output by editing the /etc/rsyslog.d/50-default.conf file to this: *.*;auth,authpriv.none,mail.none,cron.none -/var/log/syslog The relevant part ...


1

According to man dh_installcron: --name=name Look for files named debian/package.name.cron.* and install them as etc/cron.*/name, instead of using the usual files and installing them as the package name. So name your debian/package-name.foobar.cron.d, and add to debian/rules: override_dh_installcron: dh_installcron --name=foobar


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I have three solution suggestions for you. Invoke the crontab with crontab -e -u root Make sure that you have an empty line at the end of the cronjob file, meaning that every line ends with a newline. You might need to redirect the output to devnull: shutdown -r now > /dev/null Here are two helpful webpages for cronjobs: CRON Tester CRON Generator ...


1

@reboot is supported in Ubuntu. The reason why your entry @reboot /var/kiosk/btest.sh doesn't work in /etc/crontab is because it's missing the user field. The correct syntax would be @reboot root /var/kiosk/btest.sh


1

The script does not save its sent email, it just sends out the mail - that's all.



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