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7

I'm wondering what is causing that difference. It mostly depends on what software you run on Windows and on Ubuntu. In general Ubuntu has less software active and Windows tends to pre-load a lot of software during booting to speed things up when the desktop is active. Both might add to lower/higher temps. Can you help me find an answer? Sure but ...


3

You don't need to do much. As per comments, check for additional drivers. Though, I recommend running a SMART check on HDD if you were manipulating them in process. You would need actions if: You installed something from source with -march=native. -- reinstall it. You did some manual non-standart configuration to adapt to hardware -- check if it still ...


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Your output of lscpu is normal. L2 cache: 256K is normal output for an Intel dual core processor (2nd generation Sandy Bridge series1 and 3rd generation Ivy Bridge series). 1Wikipedia


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The lshw command can show you the CPU model, and you can look it up on Wikipedia: sudo lshw -C CPU | grep product product: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-3330 CPU @ 3.00GHz In general, for a Core iX processor, if the model number is 2XXX, it is a Sandy Bridge model, Ivy Bridge if 3XXX and Haswell if 4XXX. Of course, the lshw command uses internationalization, so ...


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For Intel processors, the ARK is a good place to look. The 520M's page is here and tells you everything you could possibly want to know about the processor. You can even search for Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge mobile processors and see that the 520M predates both Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge. Also, "cat /proc/cpuinfo" is more portable than lshw.


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Good shout with using cpulimit. I found this could be simplified to cpulimit -e dropbox -l 10 where -l specifies percentage of CPU. Note this is for total CPU over all cores, so a dual core would have a limit of 200 Output: cpulimit -e dropbox -l 10 Process 2641 detected


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If you have the cpupower command available (part of linux-tools-common package, I think included by default), you can use a powersaving CPU governor to limit the speed - you can list the available governors with: cpupower frequency-info --governors Example output: analyzing CPU 0: conservative ondemand userspace powersave performance And set it with ...


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The smaller L2 cache results in lower latency, and the net result is better performance on the latest dual and quad-core processors.



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