Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

30

Answering this question can get long and complicated, so I am instead going to point you to resources available instead of rehashing them here. Documentation Getting Set Up for Ubuntu Development How to Fix Bugs Tutorials We run events throughout the cycle to help people just like you, specifically we run Ubuntu Developer Week in IRC, which is a live ...


25

I good place to start is the One Hundred Paper Cuts project.


22

I'm not sure this is really the best way to measure Ubuntu's contributions to the free software world, but it's easy enough to look: List of commits in mainline from @canonical.com addresses. List of commits mainline from @ubuntu.com addresses


18

Jorge's generalized answer is a great introduction to jumping into Ubuntu development, but let's try to look a little closer at you specific issue... Apport's main upstream developer and Ubuntu maintainer are one and the same. This simplifies things for you a bit. Instead of having to learn about packaging and patch systems, the easiest path here is to work ...


14

There are tons of ways that an organized group of people can contribute to Ubuntu. Here are some of mine: LoCo Activities - formal teams in Ubuntu are called Local Teams (LoCo), they have a ton of information with good ideas on their wiki page. You can find if there's an existing LoCo team in the directory. I recommend you contact them and let them know ...


11

Aside from recommending any specific Project, keep this in mind: With open source software, You don't need to ask permission from anybody to download source code modify it re-distribute your modified versions As long as you follow the terms of the License. Many projects are apprehensive of accepting new members before they have contributed in some ...


11

Another good place to start is to look for bugs that have been marked as easy to fix, using the bitesize tag.


9

Install the package named language-pack-<two letter language code> e.g. sudo apt-get install language-pack-es for Spanish Install the package named manpages-<two letter language code> e.g. apt-get install manpages-es for Spanish man pages. Set your LANG environment variable to <language>_<country>.<encoding>, e.g. ...


9

From the www.canonical.com/contributors/faq FAQ: If I signed the old agreement, do I need to sign the new one too?No, if you previously accepted the Canonical Contributor Agreement 2.5 (or earlier), your future contributions will continue to be covered by that. However, if you wish, you can sign the new Contributor License Agreement, in which case the ...


8

There's some data provided by Greg Kroah-Hartman in his talk "The Linux Ecosystem, what it is and where do you fit in it?" for the Linux Plumbers Conference 2008. While you can find a synthesis of the talk here, the slides are not available, so you can watch the video. These are figures from 2008, but I'm sure these had not changed much: Amateurs: 17% ...


8

Both Chromium and IE do not not underline the word curation on my system. From the context menu I assume Chromium uses Google translate. Firefox does underline it. Select the word and right click. You will see an option 'add to dictionary'. After adding it the line is no longer marked. If they did their job well this word is not sent to their servers ;) ...


6

File a bug against it.: The bug must have the following elements: which release to remove it from (e.g., hardy) whether to remove both the source package and all binary packages a rationale for why they should be removed confirmation that the binary packages have no rdepends (no other package depends on them) There is checkrdepends ...


6

Yes, you are supposed to create an Ubuntu Wiki page about yourself. To do this, go to https://wiki.ubuntu.com/YourName (replacing YourName with your actual name) and click on Create a new empty page. As for what information to put on your wiki, I would look at what existing Ubuntu Members have on their wiki pages. There is a list of Ubuntu Members at ...


5

Another opportunity is to look for an area where the linux ecosystem is lacking, and create a small application to fill the space. A good example of this is simple-scan. If you can create (a) small application(s) like this that improve the life of the wider community, it goes a long way. I personally have a small game project in need of coders. If you are ...


5

GNOME Love is also a good place for new contributors to start.


4

The right answer to that question is up to you. What I mean is that you can only put your heart and soul into a project that you are interested in. Find something that you use often and that is missing a feature or it has a bug that annoys you so much that you would give up your spare time to fix it. That is the perfect project for you. Anything else ...


4

You need to conceptually separate Ubuntu from upstream, even when the upstream branch is hosted on Launchpad. The vast majority of packages in Ubuntu have their upstream branch hosted somewhere else completely (i.e. GitHub or SourceForge). An upstream project that is hosted on Launchpad might have a closer relationship with Ubuntu, but it should be treated ...


3

First welcome to Ubuntu. Best you can do to contribute to development is to run 12.04 and file bug reports. Test on as much hardware as you can, from Vritualbox to KVM to any hardware you can use. See How do I report a bug? https://help.ubuntu.com/community/ReportingBugs Other things to learn is other areas of communication. Do you know how to use IRC ...


3

If you want to tweak the kernel, you can use C or Python, these are some of the most used programming languages in the linux world. Since you already know PHP and Javascript, I would recommend Python, since it's easy to use and easier to start with. You don't actually need to learn another programming language, you can help the comunity in many ways: - ...


3

If you wish, you can branch and make tweaks or fix bugs in: Ubuntu Summit Portal Ubuntu Local Community Teams (LoCos) Portal Ubuntu Font Family website Ubuntu Start Page Ubuntu Developer Portal …and so on. There may be more websites you can provide feedback or fixes if you want. You’ll see how much fun it is to contribute!


3

Libreoffice is not developed by the Ubuntu development community. This is the place to go if you wish to get involved in the development of Libreoffice: Get involved in Libreoffice Also Libreoffice uses Hunspell as the spell-checker. You need to research how Hunspell creates dictionaries. Regards.


3

First part of question already answered. This will answer second part of question. Look at this page and locate you language and open the page for your language team from the link. https://translations.launchpad.net/+groups/ubuntu-translators If your language is not in the list refer https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Translations/KnowledgeBase/StartingTeam on ...


2

The user dictionary is just for personal use. LibreOffice does not actually collect words for dictionaries, instead it just assembles existing ones. I think the best way for personal contributions is through Wiktionary from which maybe in the future additional dictionaries can be built.


2

You can indeed donate with your credit card with Paypal, so that might have been a bad example. The ability to use Paypal gives you a range of options if you have a Paypal account, including credit from items that you sell (such as Ebay items) and even linked bank accounts. It's one of the more secure ways to do business online because only Paypal gets to ...


2

We definitely will add other ways to contribute in the future, for this release we only had time to integrate one system and there was an existing mechanism that used to be in our /community section that used PayPal and had an account ready to go, so it was, by far easiest to just use that initially. As other have mentioned, you can just use use a credit ...


2

I saw a notice a few months back stating that there will be more payment method added but that for now the best way was to purchase from the giftshop at http://shop.ubuntu.com/ They accept visa, mastercard, maestro, paypal, worldpay. If you want purchase a bunch of DVDs and give them away or get a few T-shirts. You contribute to Ubuntu but also get ...


1

You may want to take a look at OpenHatch. OpenHatch is a non-profit organization with the goals of lowering the barriers to entry into the open source community and increasing diversity. While not directly affiliated with Ubuntu or Canonical, OpenHatch has project listing of a number of upstream projects (Django, LibreOffice, Rhythmbox, for example) in ...


1

Technically, it works but with a very low performance. Some tweaks are usually needed. You can contribute to the Mactel community in the official Ubuntu wiki, most of their documents are outdated and need people like you to improve them. The matter of post-installation, there is a great answer to solve your doubts From the Ubuntu documentation: If you ...


1

This question is unanswerable, since you are not required to state which distribution you use when submitting a patch.


1

Maybe you could provide the layout via an own repo? See for example Jawi Keyboard layout and Font Project . Another way would be to get it integrated in xkb. For this you had to contact xorg developers.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible