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This single command should do the job, so it can simply be entered into your crontab: find /opt/abc/* -maxdepth 0 -mtime +2 ! -name '*.tar.gz' -exec tar czf {}.tar.gz {} \; -exec rm -rf {} \; I haven't tested it that thoroughly, but I am sure it won't accidentally delete stuff. It will, however, delete archives, if they have the same name as a directory ...


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find /path/to/directory -mtime +2 -exec ls "{}" \; Is a useful snippet to list files over 2 days old, though it only counts full days, and there's an element of rounding that happens there, so using minutes with the -mmin option may work better. I've also seen people relpace the -exec with print0 and pipe the output to xargs, handles unusual filenames ...


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You can use xargs -n 1 to only pipe a single file argument into the compress command. Be careful about spaces.


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All from running man dd in terminal: I can understand that count denotes the number of bytes to compress? What is the use of 'bs'? bs=BYTES read and write up to BYTES bytes at a time count=N copy only N input blocks once I have created the file, how do I exploit ( or extract ) it Right click, extract here? Or use the unzip ...


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I compressed the same file on my main Ubuntu desktop (15.04) and it took 49.401 seconds to complete. The machine has an Intel i5-4690k Quad-Core clocked at 3.9 GHz and 12GBs of Memory clocked at 1600MHz. During the compression it never maxed out more than one core and only ever used two cores at any given time. For comparison I also ran it on my Mini-ITX ...


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Try this instead (use sudo if needed): unlzma filename.tar.lzma then: tar xvf filename.tar To get more info about the file: lzmainfo filename.tar.lzma open-extract-lzma-under-rhel-centos-debian-ubuntu


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An EOF (end of file) error means that the application was expecting there to be more data available, but it ran out of data and reached the end of the file. In the case of trying to decompress a tarball, most likely the tarball is corrupt. If you downloaded it from the internet, you could try downloading it again.


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Your --lzma argument will work if you put it there but you have problems elsewhere. You need to put space between backboxhome.tar.gz/home/user, also you are creating a lzma compressed archive, not a gzipped one so rename the backboxhome.tar.gz to e.g. backboxhome.tar.lzma (it would be ok if you name it as gz but you would get a hard time remembering what it ...


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If there are thousands of files in the folder, it will take some time to pack them all up, even without compression. If the target machine you are using has linux on it as well, you may be able to use rsync to transfer the whole folder with files as is (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/rsync).


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The problem was that file-roller somehow became corrupted. I just had to reinstall it and everything is working.



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