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3

Since your real goal seems to be to automate whatever needs to be done to run your program, I suggest a different approach. Instead of writing a shell script, you can use a makefile. If you like, you can write a rule in your makefile for running your executable once it is built. You will then have two files--your C++ source code file and your makefile--and ...


1

Just steal the config file for the Ubuntu version of the kernel you want to build. For example, say you wanted to compile kernel 4.0 yourself. Go to the kernel PPA, get and install the kernel. Then from your build location do: cp /boot/config-4.0.0-040000-lowlatency .config where in my example, I have used the lowlatency kernel, you might use a different ...


1

Following steps are required for installing a non-compiled program ( building and installing a program directly from source code ). Step 1: Ubuntu does not come with tools required for compiling a program by default.Thus, you need to install additional packages. Execute following code in the Terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) sudo apt-get install build-essential ...


0

That uses dkms. Sources of the kernel module are in the bcmwl-kernel-source deb package. They are compiled to get kernel module (*.ko file) when the bcmwl-kernel-source package is installed or the kernel package is upgraded. So, it doesn't affect the system too much: just an additional kernel module.


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Those are pre-compiled files. There's nothing more to install, looking at the README. You run them. First, make the file executable: $ chmod +x msmc_linux_64bit Then run it: $ ./msmc_linux_64bit Usage: msmc [options] <datafiles> Options: -i, --maxIterations=<size_t> : number of EM-iterations [default=20] -o, ...


0

Don't worry about the version you installed yourself, you can just simply remove the folder. How to get to another version, then? I'd try apt-pinning for installing the package from another source. There will be a newer package in a PPA or even in another Ubuntu version and with apt-pinning you can make them available. It has it's limitations, though. ...


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support[at]sangoma.com: "... the new kernel you're using did brake our wanpipe driver." "The R&D will be relaseing a new version, I believe within two weeks or so."


0

The OP answered the question in an edit: Fixed it. Turns out it was my tmp directory that was filling up. So, if anyone runs into this in the future, check to make sure that you have enough space on /tmp. — Anthony Crognale


0

As this question has the word latest and NodeJS latest release version is now v0.12.2 (as of today) and if you want to install this version you need to run following command # Note the new setup script name for Node.js v0.12 curl -sL https://deb.nodesource.com/setup_0.12 | sudo bash - # Then install with: sudo apt-get install -y nodejs


0

First, clone the Github repository locally to download all the files to your own computer: $ git clone https://github.com/Cockatrice/Cockatrice You should then be able to view the README: $ cd Cockatrice $ less README.md # or any other plain text file viewer Install the dependencies like so: $ sudo apt-get install libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler ...


2

You may also see this message if you are running a build system that executes some build steps in parallel on a multi-core machine and one of those steps requires an output from the other, but the build system doesn't know it. For example: step1: generate header file that gets used by step 2 step2: run gcc to compile a .c file that includes the header ...


0

Restricting the user to those services isn't the sort of thing you do at the kernel level. If you want to prevent the user from running programs besides PHP &c, the easiest way is don't have those programs on your system.


0

Since this is an old report with no accepted answer, I'll suggest testing current versions of dcraw and ufraw. At least the latter should have improved Fuji X support by now (>0.20).


0

answer for @jrg is correct, But Chris Lea's Launchpad PPA will will not be supporting Node.js v0.12 and beyond. So to install last version for Node.js From new nodesource PPA according to post in nodesource Blog And joyent/node First : curl -sL https://deb.nodesource.com/setup | sudo bash - This script will: Clean up references to the old PPA if you ...


2

You need to edit your own module makefile. Kernel build makefiles are a little different from regular makefiles: the target needs to be modules, not the name of your module (test), which only needs to be specified via the obj-m variable: obj-m += test.o all: make -C /lib/modules/$(shell uname -r)/build M=$(PWD) modules


0

if you don't have sudo access, the solution is as follows: download the latest (or whichever) release of ncurses from http://ftp.gnu.org/pub/gnu/ncurses/ run these bash commands: mkdir ~/usr/local cd <path_to_ncurses> tar xzvf <ncurses>.tar.gz # change the tar command if it is not a tar.gz cd <ncurses> ./configure ...


0

Here's an example: from myBash.sh #!/bin/sh g++ myProg.cpp -o myProg ./myProg


6

You need to compile it first: first change the current working directory of Terminal to the path of your source file: cd <path_to_cpp_file>/ Then compile the source file: g++ myProg.cpp -o myProg Then you can call the compiled executable from your bash script like this: #!/bin/bash # ... <path_to_compiled_executable>/myProg # ...


2

You are compiling the code, not running it, the correct procedure is: Create the source file (test.c) Compile it with gcc test.c -o test Run it with ./test Also you can make a oneliner with these commands: gcc test.c -o test; ./test


0

Not likely. When you compile c/c++ code on a linux machine it (typically) forms an ELF binary, which windows (and mac) cannot use. You can, however, use mingw-w64 to crosscompile from a linux host to a windows binary, and you can do similar things for cross compiling to mac (but the process is by and far more complicated). Then comes the fact you mention ...



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