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0

I made a really dumb mistake. The GUI wasn't set to visible >_<


1

This looks like the thing you need. Make sure you have linux-headers-generic installed.


0

Fixed it! I've just deleted all the .user files in the project folder.


0

sorry guys, I did figure out the problem, it was the name of defconfig file,that what I did ex: I have at first this: anyname_defconfig, I renamed it to: bravo_defconfig. and the errors disappear. but also still there is a problem [the errors love me lol:(] this what i had : include/linux/kern_levels.h:10:18: note: in expansion of macro 'KERN_SOH' #define ...


1

You can also customize the output file by using gcc <sourcefilename> -o <destinationfilename> Note: you can even dump the output file in a different folder by including the path in the file name. Ex gcc mysource.c -o ./myfolder/mybinary.out This will create a file named mybinary.out in the folder, myfolder, within your current working ...


1

When write programs in C, you must compile the program with a compiler (here gcc). So you get an executable file (here a.out). you should give that file execution permissions with the following command: chmod +x a.out and then run your compiled program with ./a.out


2

time { . ../configure \ You're sourcing configure! Every command in it is then run in the current shell, instead of a subshell. If exit is encountered, the shell will exit. Did you mean: time { ../configure \


0

Yes, you have to replace all the missing files of this folder: https://github.com/benjarobin/MT7630E with this one https://github.com/neurobin/MT7630E/tree/e7130a42f8198cbf503a5a307175073c078bf340 following the same procedure of the last one. with my ASUS N751JK on Ubuntu 14.04.4 kernel 4.2.0-35-generic work fine !!! thank you  Devin Hudson


0

The bash sample in the question seems to have been corrected - although it is quite strange to call an executable file ".exe" in a GNU/Linux system isn't it? If you don't need the output file to be an executable I'd suggest to do cobc -free $1 cobcrun $(basename "$1")


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@daltonfury42's answer is one way to do it, but note that it will run the script first before going into the interpreter. Another one is to just run the interpreter in the same directory as your script and import it. $ cat spam.py def main(*args): print("Called main() with args: ", args) if __name__ == "__main__": main("foo") $ python3 spam.py ...


1

What you are looking for is the -i switch. According to the manpages: -i When a script is passed as first argument or the -c option is used, enter interactive mode after executing the script or the command. It does not read the $PYTHONSTARTUP file. This can be useful to inspect global variables or a stack trace when a ...


0

The only thing I can think of that might change based on the terminal you use to connect would be locale-related settings (which do sometimes interfere with compiling). Check the values of your $LANG or $LC_<whatever> environment variables (using e.g. echo $LANG). Sometimes setting LANG=C (export LANG=C) helps in getting things to compile (but it ...


0

I understand that you are using two different ssh clients. Try login in with both of them and checking the output of the "env" command together with "echo $PATH", and compare the results. If one of the "MacTerm" environmental variables or entries in the PATH is different, set it to the same value as in the "Mac Terminal".


0

I rebuild with following packages and repositories. You need those packages: - - "build-essential" - "fakeroot" - "dpkg-dev" - "python-software-properties" - "software-properties-common" - "rsync" - "ubuntu-keyring" - "ubuntu-extras-keyring" - "debian-keyring" - "debian-ports-archive-keyring" - ...


0

/home/devin/Desktop/MT7630E-release linux wireless driver The command make doesn't like spaces in the name. Please try renaming the folder to: MT7630E-release Or to: /home/devin/Desktop/MT7630E-release_linux_wireless_driver Or something with no spaces. Then try the make, sudo make install sequence again.


0

The arc4random function is a BSD utility that is not part of the standard C library on Ubuntu. To use it, I think that you will need to install the libbsd-dev package, and then include the BSD version of the header explicitly using #include <bsd/stdlib.h> You will then need to link your executable with the libbsd library by adding -lbsd to your ...


1

You can upgrade your compiler, or just modify the setup.py file. Find the following line: extra_compile_args=['-std=c++11'])], And change the flag into -std=c++0x, which makes it: extra_compile_args=['-std=c++0x'])], And run it again, it should work with this. (Tested with the mimclib source code on github)


1

You need at least gcc 4.8 to compile this. See How to install gcc-4.8 for how you can install it on Ubuntu 12.04.


0

Okay so I've searched around a bit more and found that the "make" command doesn't work because the previous ./configure command doesn't work. I read the full error in the terminal and it said to install gmp, mpc and mpfr (Newest versions). In the gcc directory there is a file that downloads them for you and installs them nicely. Here's the link, It'll guide ...


2

Your gcc might be corrupted, try to re-install gcc-4.8: apt-get install --reinstall gcc-4.8


1

While this should have been posted elsewhere, this is the solution: Always initialize! You are not initializing the coe[100] array of all the elements in your struct poly*. In your loops you only set some of the entries, however your mul-function also accesses uninitialized ones. I assume that gcc on linux somehow takes care of that by intilializing them ...


1

It is very strange that whatever program you are trying to compile ships a 32 bit binary library instead of its source code, but apparently this library can be found here, and if you compile that you should get a 64 bit libgll that you should be able to use to compile this program for 64 bit.


1

Try using the following command: ./configure --with-gtk2 It really works.


0

Compile works here with a small tweak: sudo apt-get install build-essential automake mkdir $HOME/shout_build && cd $HOME/shout_build wget http://downloads.sourceforge.net/project/shout-toolkit/release-2010-version-0-3.tar.gz tar xvf release-2010-version-0-3.tar.gz && cd release-2010-version-0-3 sed -i_bak ...


0

The XF86 Driver shouldn't need updating, though the input-wacom driver might. Which tablet (lsusb output) and which ubuntu are you using?


0

If you are building a Qt project, Qt Creator tool may be of use -- it supports multiple Qt versions to be set as build kits, you just need to have the proper compiler installed and locate the qmake file of the desired Qt. If otherwise you are convinced to build something from command line (ex.: development is not the key goal), check the following: qmake ...


0

RESOLVED There was, among the various class files, one that had not been compiled since the software upgrade. I knew all the others were being recompiled, but I just didn't notice this one. Thus it had a non-matching compiler tag. Sorry.


-1

It Works fine for me, compiling Mame 0.172 on Linux Mint 17.3! (with qt5-default package installed previously sudo apt-get install qt5-default and executing on terminal this: export QT_SELECT=qt5 (for Qt5 version as default on system))


1

Save the file somewhere as program.cpp then open a terminal and cd to the directory you saved the file. To compile the program with gcc run gcc -o program program.cpp. If there are no errors in the program this will output a binary with your compiled program called program which you can run with ./program in the terminal.



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