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I know this old now, but I was experiencing this too. It happened to me after loosing grub2. I had to install it from a live CD. The desktop remained with a dodgy green hue to it until I updated grub. Try this and see if it works: sudo update-grub after rebooting the green hue was fixed. maybe just be correlation rather causation, but worth a shot if you ...


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Be sure git will use color with: git config --global color.ui auto Using bash and with git installed from the up-to-date package (1.9.1-1). Add the following to .bashrc and then restart bash: PROMPT_COMMAND='__git_ps1 "\u@\h:\w" "\\\$ "' GIT_PS1_DESCRIBE_STYLE='describe' GIT_PS1_SHOWDIRTYSTATE=1 GIT_PS1_SHOWCOLORHINTS=1 You don't need to change your ...


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The http does syntax coloring naturally. To set a bash prompt like this one, add the contents of this file to your ~/.bashrc. It is an adaptation of the prompt from this SO answer. I have changed the colours, added couple more colour variables and parentheses.


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The Gnome Terminal profiles for base16 seem to only use 10 of the 16 colors. It may be a bug. I reported it as this issue in the base16-builder repository. I think this means that the only solution for now is to either fix the issue in base-16 builder, or else manually set the 16 colors in Gnome Terminal.


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RGB colors can not be used in the terminal for these reasons: Bash does not choose the commandline colors. Bash can only specify ANSI colors. The two above reasons are very closely linked. Most of these are dependant on your screen and ANSI color specification. If you use a good terminal emulator, you might be able to set custom RGB colors for certain ...


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A version that is a bit more 'general' - should work with a varied environment: (depends on terminfo) Insert this in your $HOME/.bashrc function fgtab { echo "tput setf/setb - Foreground/Background table" for (( f=0; f<8 ; f++ ));do for (( b=0; b<8 ; b++ ));do echo -en "$(tput setf ${f})$(tput setb ${b}) $f/$b "; done; echo -e ...


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I came up with this solution: open ~/.bashrc in an editor copy this and add it at the end of .bashrc file: PS1='\[\033[1;36m\]\u\[\033[1;31m\]@\[\033[1;32m\]\h:\[\033[1;35m\]\w\[\033[1;31m\]\$\[\033[0m\] ' save the file and restart bashrc: source ~/.bashrc For a full list of available colors and further options look up these links: ...


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If you built screen from source you'll need to recompile it with the 256 color flag enabled. Run ./configure --enable-colors256 && make && sudo make install


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A different solution, using xwd and xdotool: xwd -root -silent | convert xwd:- -depth 8 -crop "1x1+$X+$Y" txt:- | grep -om1 '#\w\+' where $X and $Y are your coordinates. As part of Xorg xwd should come preinstalled on your system. xdotool can be installed with: sudo apt-get install xdotool Based on @Christian's answer on a StackOverflow Q&A ...



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