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47

Installing a root/CA Certificate Given a CA ceritificate file 'foo.crt', follow these steps to install it on Ubuntu: Create a directory for extra CA certificates in /usr/share/ca-certificates sudo mkdir /usr/share/ca-certificates/extra Copy the '.crt' file to the directory sudo cp foo.crt /usr/share/ca-certificates/extra/foo.crt Let Ubuntu add the ...


11

Given a CA certificate file 'foo.crt', follow these steps to install it on Ubuntu: First, copy your CA to dir /usr/local/share/ca-certificates/ sudo cp foo.crt /usr/local/share/ca-certificates/foo.crt then, update CA store sudo update-ca-certificates That's all. You should get this output: Updating certificates in /etc/ssl/certs... 1 added, 0 ...


7

Anyone can teach about Ubuntu and a certification is not required. Manuals for 11.10 can be found here. Particularly the Ubuntu desktop help will be useful to you if you want to cover the desktop (the other 2 are about server and installing).


7

The problem here is that Firefox does not have a 'central' location where it looks for certificates. It just looks into the current profile. That's why modifying /usr/share/ca-certificates or other similar directories won't work with Firefox. This is something that has been requested for years; see issues 620373, 449498 and 454036 (and probably there are ...


6

Given the extra information you've provided, it is probably easier for me to start another answer. It doesn't appear that the dummy "snakeoil" certificate is being presented to the Windows client. The "snakeoil" certificate is generated with a subject of CN=Ubuntu, while the certificate being presented to the Windows box has a subject of CN=Production. So ...


5

The easiest way is to import the certificate into a sample firefox-profile and then copy the cert8.db to the users you want equip with the certificate. First import the certificate by hand into the firefox profile of the sample-user. Then copy /home/${USER}/.mozilla/firefox/${randomalphanum}.default/cert8.db into the users firefox-profiles. That's it. ...


4

Part One: With Firefox, back up the certificate as a .p12 file. In Firefox, click Edit > Preferences to display the Preferences dialog. On the Preferences dialog, click the Advanced button. On the Advanced form, click the the View Certificates button to display the Certificate Manager dialog. On the Certificate Manager dialog, click the Your ...


4

You could disable password-based login on the ssh server and remove the iptables rules. Nobody will then be able to brute-force a password-login because it's disabled, but trusted users with their key-pairs would be able to login from everywhere. To limit the usage of the keys, you can specify which hosts they can be used from with the from parameter in ...


4

Why must Ubuntu respect Indian law? Mozilla handles the certificate vetting for most Linux distributions (and most applications - even Chrome uses's Mozilla's NSS AFAIK) and they're bundled into ca-certificates along with some Debian infrastructure certificates. Mozilla is the party that the Indian government has to prove their value to. They've been in ...


3

Run sudo dpkg-reconfigure ca-certificates That should give you a list where you can deselect CAs. The list of CAs is stored in the file /etc/ca-certificates.conf. If you edit this file manually you need to run sudo update-ca-certificates to update the actual certificates in /etc/ssl/certs/ (if you use dpkg-reconfigure that is done automatically). ...


3

1 . No 2.Yes you can use. But you should obtain permission from canonical 3.AFAIK no 4.I don't know about such sites, But you are already doing it here(askubuntu.com) 5.There is no need of permissions to teach ubuntu


3

It may be too late to help you, but I'm posting this here for future reference. I had the same problem. I ended up just typing the file name in the address at the top and it worked. Took me an hour to figure it out though.


3

I went around for a bit, and seems that your "Company name" is too long for openSSL. This is a bug. You should upgrade your system to precise or later to fix this. Remove any blocking package and upgrade your system. That should fix the issue.


2

The key excerpt from the output is this error while running the post-installation script for the ssl-cert package: Setting up ssl-cert (1.0.23ubuntu2) ... dpkg: error processing ssl-cert (--configure): subprocess installed post-installation script returned error exit status 1 All of the subsequent errors are a consequence of the failure to complete the ...


2

If you're fine with using the command line, this is easily done using gpg --gen-revoke. The revocation certificate is stored in revoke.asc (in your home directory if you do not change anything else) and you should replace mykey by your key id. gpg --output revoke.asc --gen-revoke mykey Remember to store it in a save place, for example by printing it to a ...


2

This is a known bug in wget 1.12. As you are running an unsupported version of ubuntu the best course of action would be to upgrade to a supported version . wget 1.14 is the latest version in ubuntu and has fixed this bug.


2

Thanking to poupou, we have already an answer: This was fixed recently. The easiest way to get the fix is to update to Mono 3.2.x. An alternative is using an older Mono (e.g. 2.10) to download the certificates. Source: mozroots command fails with Unsupported hash error


2

I just had the same issue. I was able to resolve it by logging out, switching to Unity, and connecting to the network there. I think it had something to do with Gnome 3 desktop not being as integrated. I think it only lets you manage one "pop up menu" at a time. In Unity, it doesn't open the Network Settings in the background, so you can click Ignore or you ...


2

Well you can run it under Wine which is a layer that allows you to run windows applications under Ubuntu. The other option is to use Pidgin protocol plugin to connect to MS Office Communicator. it is offered under the name pidgin-sipe. To install, and for more information, see the SIPE Project website. Or to install just click it Pidgin-Sipe


2

You can sign PDF files with gpg/seahorse. Learn more: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/GnuPrivacyGuardHowto You can for instance use OpenSignPDF, that can be download here: http://opensignature.sourceforge.net/english.php I hope this answers your question.


2

If you have Thunderbird installed, you need to import the certificate into Thunderbird's certificates store.


2

http://www.thedeveloperday.com/subversion-self-signed-certificates/ Have you done the steps outlined there?


2

The "snakeoil" certificate is automatically generated when the ssl-cert package is installed. It is a self signed certificate, so revoking it doesn't make much sense. You can easily generate a new one though: sudo make-ssl-cert generate-default-snakeoil --force-overwrite You will probably have to restart any service that was making use of that ...


2

Ok, found the answer after much poking around and searching. apt-get install ca-certificates Probably apt-get install ssl-cert is needed too if you haven't already installed it.


2

Check System date time and timezone in Ubuntu. Provide Proper time and timezone and then try to browse https site. If you have wrong time in your system you will get Untrusted connection error while connecting to site that uses ssl.


1

They are NOT safe and that is why they are marked as Untrusted. These were bogus certificates. See this article on EFF: On March 15th, an HTTPS/TLS Certificate Authority (CA) was tricked into issuing fraudulent certificates that posed a dire risk to Internet security. Based on currently available information, the incident got close to — but was not ...


1

Use the Debian package ca-certificates which will incorporate (beside others) all CA certificates which Mozilla Firefox/Thunderbird/etc. uses. You can use the certificate file (all certificates in one, PEM formatted) in Python as follows: ssl_sock = ssl.wrap_socket(sock, ca_certs="/etc/ssl/certs/ca-certificates.crt", ...


1

I had removed SSL but it was still giving following error: Restarting web server apache2 apache2: Could not reliably determine the server's fully qualified domain name, using 127.0.1.1 for ServerName apache2: Could not reliably determine the server's fully qualified domain name, using 127.0.1.1 for ServerName (98)Address already in use: make_sock: ...


1

You removed all certificates yourself: sudo rm -rf /etc/ssl/certs/* This line broke your system. One thing you can do to fix this is to purge (not just remove) the ca-certificates package, then reinstall it: sudo apt-get purge ca-certificates sudo apt-get install ca-certificates Note that this is likely to remove most of your system. Another, less ...



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