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0

The other answers concentrate on software; I'll add another "layer" to this. The fact that the disc (CD or DVD) is physically damaged is likely to impose a limitation on the possible results of the software approach. I still do recommend to try them FIRST as what follows below might destroy your data entirely if you're too rough with it. A process ...


0

Doh ! If it is just one or a few directories, why not have aliases in your bashrc or whatever init files? For example: alias abc='cd /tmp/"a b c"' Then whenever you want to go in there, just type abc


1

The simplest way is to double click on the directory name (assuming it is visible on the screen), then type cd followed by space and click the wheel button on your mouse and it will copy and paste the directory name that you have highlighted. Pressing the enter key will then change to the directory required. I use this procedure all the time and it's not ...


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Solution made by OP No built-in command found here . But finally I am able to write a C program to use cd(lets call my program icd == (inode cd) ) to enter in a folder using inode value. Here I am posting the raw code. But there is a fundamental problem I have faced here. While coding execution a C code from a bash needed to create child process under the ...


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After a great deal of confusion and time wasted I have discovered the source of my problem and wanted to share the information because I believe that many others have encountered the same problem. Fundamentally the audio CDs that I was trying to play are non-standard audio CDs and probably cannot be read by my combination of DVD-ROM and Linux software. ...


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You can make Tab rotate the available folders instead of listing them. Edit the file ~/.inputrc and add "\C-i": menu-complete "\e[Z": "\e-1\C-i" If you want it for all users, edit /etc/inputrc instead. Press Ctrl + x and Ctrl + r to make it effective. Now use cdTab to navigate to your folder without writing its name. cdShift + Tab will rotate in the ...


5

You can use shell wildcards. For instance, I can do cd a?b?c?d or cd a\*b\*c\*d And it will expand the wildcards to the actual name and change to that directory. Assuming that's the only directory which matches. If you have both a b c d and a1b2c3d, then cd a?b?c?d will expand to either cd a1b2c3d a b c d or cd a b c d a1b2c3d (the actual order will ...


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see freedb "submit new entries" howto: http://www.freedb.org/en/download__miscellaneous.11.html Basically you can use email and HTTP POST submission but for details see the doc. Also email method with example described here: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1669680&p=10883530#post10883530 basically best is to use some program to do it for you. ...


1

Not sure if that's exactly what your asking for, but zsh has some neat tricks to access a directory by other means than typing the directory's strict name; for one, you can type a part of the name and it will expand to the directory's full name, which allows for very useful things, for example: Hitting TAB...


17

Any entity in (most) file systems on Linux has an unique identifier called an inode. Notice that a file can have more than one name (hardlink), but directories have just one link in all the filesystems I know of. Notice that the concept of inode is local to the filesystem, so that in two different devices (partition or whatever) the uniqueness is not ...


4

You can find this directory in a file manager, e.g. nautilus and just drag and drop it to terminal. If you previously type cd in terminal, you will get the command.


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I suggest SafeCopy! It works properly (at least for me) and is very simple to install and use. You may install it using sudo apt-get -install safecopy I suggest you to use three pre-defined stages as follows (suppose that your CD/DVD device file is /dev/cdrom): safecopy --stage1 /dev/cdrom /tmp/mycd.iso The output of above commands will be something ...



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