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3

Since you want to learn bash internal source code, let's get it first with: apt-get source bash && cd bash-4.3 I'm running 14.04 and I now have a folder named bash-4.3. Prefer the apt-get source solution as it will apply all the patches that the Ubuntu package version provides. Now modify the following files: Index: bash-4.3/bashhist.c ...


0

This is more generic and will find matches even if they aren't in a row. I haven't done the whole thing, but this should get you started. The basic idea is, use two loops to scroll through the array, one for the value that you want to match, and one to check the other values for matches. Everytime you get a match you add a number to the "matches" variable, ...


-1

I got the following error : arm-none-linux-gnueabi-gcc: error trying to exec 'cc1': execvp: No such file or directory Basically, the problem was that some files, probably (arm-none-linux-gnueabi-gcc). wasn't having root permissions. If you try to run as a root, error will go away. Permanent solution is to use chmod with argument 777 on toolchain. I did ...


5

Indeed, clear_screen is a macro: $ grep clear_screen /usr/include/term.h #define clear_screen CUR Strings[5] You will have to use some other name, like the linked page does: void Clear_screen (void) The compiler messages also state this: clear_screen_UNIX.c:9:6: note: in expansion of macro ‘clear_screen’ That's why the errors seem ...


0

i think i found a solution..i placed the CVAPI macro there as a result of a previous error after trying to compile the code in C...by removing CVAPI and compiling in c++ i kinda saw my expected result (although the inside code is build in C, the compilation should be in C++, openCV and C is not a promising relationship anymore :P )


2

malloc() allocates memory from the heap, which it manages. It very well may return a chunk of heap that was previously used and then free()ed, and so it will still contain whatever data was there before. When there is no heap yet, or not any free, it has to obtain more ram from the kernel to enlarge the heap. When the kernel gives a new process more ram, ...


1

Step one, back up all your data to EXTERNAL MEDIA, which is to say, not a drive internal to your computer. Even if your D drive is a physically separate drive, it is possible that your data could be overwritten, and I would wager that would make you very unhappy. Step two, install ubuntu choosing the Side By Side option. This preserves your windows ...


5

Desktop is not located at /Desktop rather it is located at ~/Desktop. Thus execute these commands. cd ~/Desktop (for changing directory to Desktop) gcc hello.c -o hello (for compiling C program) Then execute your application by ./hello , if it shows any error change its permissions with chmod +x hello


4

Then I typed within the terminal: cd /Desktop /Desktop is not the path to your desktop. /Desktop is the path to a directory "Desktop" in / (your root directory). /home/<username>/Desktop or, shortened, ~/Desktop is the path to your desktop. So first change your terminal's working directory to your desktop's path: cd ~/Desktop Then compile the ...


1

To find the Linux source: $ apt-cache search linux-source linux-source - Linux kernel source with Ubuntu patches linux-source-3.13.0 - Linux kernel source for version 3.13.0 with Ubuntu patches To install the Linux source: $ sudo apt-get install linux-source linux-source-3.13.0 To see what you got: $ dpkg -L linux-source-3.13.0 Then, to find ...


0

I struggled with this for a very long time, compiling in -m32 mode worked, but it was a pain in the ass, moreover if I wanted to use e.g. -lcrypto, I couldnt compile in -m32 since I didnt have openssl in 32bit installed. So I read through a lot of similar posts, usually advising installing libc6-dbg:i386 ... I think this solved the problem for -m32, but it ...


-1

Except they have now switched back: Since the beginning of 2014, the official homepage states that EGLIBC is no longer being developed, since its "goals are now being addressed directly in GLIBC", and Debian has switched back to glibc[4] for the Debian 8.0 (Jessie) release. -- Wikipedia


3

Are you running Code::Blocks and or Geany in Wine? I ask because C program files isn't a usual Linux directory. First, install g++ : sudo apt-get install g++ Next: In Geany Compiling and running goes like this: Compile: click this button: Build: Click this button: I think what is happening in Geany is that you are "compiling" which checks your code ...



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