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1) Network: If you want to see your service/site on the home subnet (192.168.xxx.xxx IP-s), then you should ensure that IP addresses are stable. I have a router which has a built-in DHCP server that gives home subnet IP-s to devices based on which connected first. There are two ways to handle this problem: you can set configure device to have a preferred ...


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I tried multiple methods none of which removed the eclipse installation in /opt. So finally I manually removed the folder aniket@aniket-Compaq-610:~$ cd /opt aniket@aniket-Compaq-610:/opt$ sudo rm -rf eclipse Doing this will uninstall eclipse. But it will still appear in the unity search. To remove it from search as well delete eclipse.desktop file from ...


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Here's a way to use make to build and run your program without requiring any additional setup: make CXXFLAGS='-Wall -Werror' hello_world && ./hello_world But assuming you will continue developing, you will want to create a file called Makefile to streamline things further. CXXFLAGS = -Wall -Werror default: build build: hello_world run: build ...


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All you need to do is go to the file location in the terminal and compile the program using: g++ (yourFileName). If you get no feedback run the file using: ./a.out, if you get feedback you have an error in your code


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open a terminal and execute the following 1- g++ -o outfilename.bin source.cpp 2- ./outfilename.bin that assumes the source file is source.cpp


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First you need to compile and link your program. Assuming the source code is saved in a file yourprog.cpp, you can do that using the GNU C++ compiler g++, for example g++ -Wall -o yourprog yourprog.cpp The resulting executable will be called yourprog and you can then run it using ./yourprog


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You can get a comma separated list of packages that have installed files to /usr/include/c++ with dpkg --search /usr/include/c++ and then run for each listed package sudo apt-get install --reinstall


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try reinstalling g++ sudo apt-get install --reinstall g++


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You can compile your programs with C++ in the command line - you don't have to have a full enterprise IDE with a GUI and all. Navigate to the directory with the .cpp program, and use g++ with the "-std=c++11" flag and it will compile it to C++ 11. For example: g++ -std=c++11 your_file.cpp I did a lot of my Kernel coding through compiling in command line.


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Many people end up using QtCreator. It can do C++, Qt, Python. Hardcore way is Emacs. You can do a lot of things when you master it, but it is a big when. Netbeans is a nice, but heavy thing. Eclipse even nicer and heavier. Best of all start with QtCreator. Its scripting can mimic to some extent most cool features you heard of in others.


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It looks to me like library versions mismatch - you build on newer system (14.04) linking to one version of library and start it on a bit older (12.04), using different version of the library.



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