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Okay so this is how I did it. First install libnotify-dev: sudo apt-get install libnotify-dev this will install the lib on your system and put the headers of the lib to /usr/include/libnotify/ You can take a look at the header files to find out how to use the lib. I did the following: #include <libnotify/notify.h> #include <iostream> int ...


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Make sure you understand the difference between header files and libraries. Header files (like /usr/include/boost/filesystem.hpp) is what you use in your source code as part of your #include directive. The C++ preprocessor reads that file and adds a bunch of declarations to your program. A library is a compiled collection of various functions, static data ...


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You can change gdb capabilities with sudo setcap cap_sys_ptrace=eip /usr/bin/gdb man capabilities tells cap_sys_ptrace gives right to Trace arbitrary processes using ptrace(2); apply get_robust_list(2) to arbitrary processes; inspect processes using kcmp(2). See also man cap_from_text. This is a solution that is not removed by reboot, but it is ...


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This should be on [AskUbuntu.SE] or [SU] likely. Anyways, to see what gets linked, do a ldd on your program ldd a.out To see where the libraries belonging to a package ended up: dpkg --listfiles libboost-filesystem1.48.0 To find out which package owns the file you see: dpkg --search /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libboost_filesystem.so.1.48.0


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Trying GNU Octave's own minimal example I was able to compile and run it without problems (and without having the "oct.h" file localy in the path) using bla@bla:~$ mkoctfile --link-stand-alone test.cpp -o test bla@bla:~$ ./test Hello Octave world! 11 12 21 22 In order to be able to use "mkoctfile", you need to first install sudo apt-get install ...



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