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30

Byobu 5.x has excellent support for tmux. New installations of Byobu 5.x and above will default to using tmux as the backend. Upgrades from older versions, however, will not automatically make that switch. Still, you can manually run byobu with tmux by typing byobu-tmux. Similarly, you can manually choose to run with the screen backend by typing ...


30

It is very easy. (At least on my ubuntu 10.04 machine, where byobu uses screen.); If you already have one session running, and do not want to reattach but instad create a new one, just type: byobu -S my-other-session Where my-other-session is how you are naming the new session. Later, if you have already more than one byobu sessions running, it is ...


27

You can easily toggle on/off the use of the F-keys inside of Byobu (tmux) by pressing either: shift-F12 (in tmux) ctrl-a-! (in screen) Full disclosure: I'm the author and maintainer of Byobu.


20

Put the following in your $HOME/.byobu/.tmux.conf: set -g default-shell /usr/bin/zsh set -g default-command /usr/bin/zsh Full disclosure: I'm the author and maintainer of Byobu.


16

Besides GNU screen I would recommend tmux. It is a terminal multiplexer like GNU screen.


15

I personally use GNU Screen (byobu to be specific) and gnome-terminal. You can become really efficient with it. I use GNU Screen because I often have long-lived terminal sessions that I can check on or come back to later, but you seem to be more interested in a graphical solution for managing terminal windows. byobu I would highly suggest Terminator ...


15

Yes, this is very much possible. You simply need to turn on mouse support in your ~/.byobu/.tmux.conf configuration. Add the following: set -g mouse-select-pane on set -g mouse-select-window on set -g mouse-resize-pane on set -g mouse-utf8 on This will allow you to: select a split by clicking in it select a window by clicking on it in your status bar ...


13

Just press SHIFT-F12 To toggle F-keys on and off. Example : Launch htop (within a byobu pane of course) then enter SHIFT-F12, then if you press F3 you will search in htop processes, not create a byobu window.


12

Yes, this is possible. You just have to enter scrollback mode first. Simply press F7, and then use your mouse scroll wheel. Finally, press ESC to exit scrollback mode. It appears that some terminals won't allow you to scroll using your mouse still. For Gnome Terminal, untick the Scroll on keystroke option in the profile preferences (tab Scrolling).


11

This shows the number of packages that need to be updated on the system.


10

I like guake, which is a drop-down editor (named after the console in games like quake). You press a button and it slides down, press another button and it hides away. Press another button to make it full screen, etc. It supports transparency, tabs, color... you name it. (You could run GNU screen on the inside to get more than one visible at a time.) It's ...


10

Great question! This isn't directly possible, due to the way Tmux works, from a client-server perspective. Nonetheless, there is a viable workaround... Basically, you just need to have separate sessions. Byobu makes this easy and convenient through a couple of keybindings. F2 creates new windows Alt-Left and Alt-Right moves back and forth between them ...


10

For byobu-within-byobu, you need to know the original, non-f-key bindings for each of the f-key commands. So for F6, for example, that's really ctrl-a-d for detach. You can then send the detach signal to the inner session using ctrl-a-a-d. And that scales well with the depth of the nested sessions. So for byobu-within-byobu-within-byobu, you'd use ...


9

If you still have this problem, Try ALT + F12 In my case, this enables mouse scrolling on byobu


9

Byobu is simply a shell for the tmux (or screen) back end terminal multiplexor. You can therefore pass any command that your back end supports through Byobu. Byobu with tmux back end To start a new Byobu session with a specified name: byobu new -s <session-name> To change the name of a pre-existing session: byobu rename -t <session-name> ...


9

Byobu is a user-friendly wrapper around GNU Screen, which is a terminal multiplexer. Unless you're a command line junkie or sysadmin you likely don't need it; you can remove it without it affecting your GUI.


9

From http://manpg.es/byobu.1: updates_available - the number of updates available on the system; displayed in the lower bar toward the right in white text on a red background with a trailing '!' sign; if any updates are marked 'security updates', then there will be a total of two trailing exclamation points, '!!' ...


9

Okay, there's a couple of ways you can do this... You can put your customizations in ~/.byoburc, which is sourced last You can set an environment variable, BYOBU_WINDOWS=/path/to/a/config, and then run byobu. Many people use this to start different byobu sessions with different windows open at launch. For more information here, see the WINDOWS section of ...


8

In you case, you have explicitly disabled your status line, as you can tell by the flag file status.disable. You can either remove this file or run byobu-quiet --undo. It looks like you figured this out and answered your own question in the comment. As to your new question in your comment, we have disabled a few of the infrequently used and hard to ...


8

I'm assuming that you configured byobu to use Ctrl-a as tmux's escape sequence. The commands that you type in your terminal are first handled by your local tmux instance, then handled by the nested tmux session. This means you need to escape twice to go to the nested instance: Ctrl-a c # opens a window in your local session Ctrl-a Ctrl-a c # opens a ...


7

That weird character, sometimes displayed as ⌷, is the Ubuntu unicode logo, . Byobu tries to use Unicode symbols, but sometimes those may not display correctly, if you're on a system that doesn't include that character in its font set. All of Byobu's symbols are tested to display properly on on Ubuntu (with the Ubuntu font) within Gnome-Terminal, but your ...


7

You can also toggle between the f-keys bindings and the screen-escape-keys bindings using: ctrl-a-!


6

Unfortunately, the 11.10 AMIs automatically run the screen command on ssh from a terminal using a package named byobu which uses up the bottom two lines with colorful line noise. You can disable this on a given instance by typing the command: byobu-disable which will log you out. The next ssh will work fine. Note: This post includes statements that ...


6

Unfortunately, the pre-release Oneiric AMIs automatically run the screen command on ssh from a terminal which causes all of your ssh sessions to share a single screen. You can learn how to use screen to disassociate what your terminals see, or... You can disable this on a given instance by typing the command: byobu-disable which will log you out. The ...


6

As Eric said, you can disable byobu on the host with: $ byobu-disable Once ssh'd in, you can disconnect from the current session but maintain a local shell with . You can ssh in, and run bash instead of byobu: $ ssh -t <hostname> bash And you can also make that permanent and affect all of your ssh sessions to Ubuntu/byobu hosts (where byobu > ...


6

Go into Terminator's Preferences > Profile > Command > Run a custom command instead of my shell and add it. You need to F9 once it opens and set it as well.


6

One solution was to switch the backend to screen. However, I had recurring issues with ctrl-right when I did that. To do that change ~/.byobu/backend to BYOBU_BACKEND=screen. I subsequently found a much better solution using tmux from this bug. Create ~/.byobu/.tmux.conf with this value: set-window-option -g xterm-keys on Then ~/.byobu/keybindings.tmux ...


6

Use the -S option to give your next byobu session (e.g. its socket) a different name. Without -S "MYNAME" the socket would be <pid>.<tty>.<host> instead of <pid>.MYNAME.


6

Since you are using 10.04 I'll assume you are still using the screen backend to byobu. You should also learn the screen shortcuts - at least the most important ones. Ctrl+ac == create new window Ctrl+ap == previous window Ctrl+an == next window Ctrl+aa == toggle between two windows Ctrl+a[number] == switch to window [number] Ctrl+ad == detach from session ...


6

Shift-F12 Toggle on/off Byobu's keybindings Keystrokes will be send to the inner byobu.



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