Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

Brasero It comes default with Ubuntu. Simple interface, but powerfull features. Some of them: Data CD/DVD: supports edition of discs contents (remove/move/rename files inside directories) can burn data CD/DVD on the fly automatic filtering for unwanted files (hidden files, broken/recursive symlinks, files not conforming to joliet standard, ...) ...


15

That's right. Brasero does not make DVDs. However there are many tools around that work fine. I'd recommend DeVeDe (see multiverse) for easy doing so. Or, alternatively any other video authoring software.


14

Brasero Disc Burner Comes as a default application in Ubuntu. Supports features like on-the-fly burning, multi-session, on-the-fly conversion of music playlists in all formats supported by GStreamer and so on. Click on your Dash and type Brasero to access it and give it a try OR If its not installed (for whatever reason) you can install it from the ...


14

You could give "K9Copy - KDE tool to backup DVDs" a try. It's very much capable of disassembling the individual streams, putting them back together (even customising the selection of audio/video tracks) and then burning it to a new disc. It seems it's not even capable of putting a region code onto a blank DVD, so (ab)use that as a feature! A sort of ...


11

What you do need to make a DVD work for a DVD Player is a program called Devede. 1 - Open up Ubuntu Software Centre and in the search field type devede and it will be shown in the results. 2 - Install that program. 3 - Start the program and then you will see a series of options. 4 - choose Video DVD: Creates a video DVD suitable for all DVD home ...


9

No action should need be taken. All ISO writing software I have encountered can successfully write a .ISO file intended for CD to DVD, such that the result may be used on devices expecting DVD media, assuming the underlying data is compatible. My experience is limited to images providing bootable operating systems and media (movies, music) however, so it ...


9

You can do it via command-line : Create a Folder called dvd. Create two folders in that directory called : VIDEO_TS subdirectory. AUDIO_TS subdirectory. copy the vob. and ifo. files to VIDEO_TS. Using mkisofs to create a DVD video ISO image mkisofs -dvd-video -o dvdimage.iso dvd/ Note: dvd/ is the directory that contains the VIDEO_TS ...


9

isoinfo can probably tell you if it has the right files to boot if you want quick and dirty. isoinfo -l -i is_it_bootable.iso will list the directory structure so you can check for files a live cd / bootable cd should have. isoinfo -d -i is_it_bootable.iso will tell you if the CD has an El Torito section. Ubuntu's live CD iso reports: Eltorito ...


9

how-to using ubuntu Brasero (Included by default) Brasero is a application to burn CD/DVD for the Gnome Desktop. It is designed to be as simple as possible and has some unique features to enable users to create their discs easily and quickly. K3B (Available in the software center) K3b (from KDE Burn Baby Burn) is a CD and DVD authoring ...


8

how-to using windows It was brought to my attention that this was answered quite well here. I top-posted the edit since I think it's a better answer. I leave the original because it is my personal answer/preference. First, if you're a Windows user trying out Ubuntu for the first time - Welcome Windows 8 Windows 8 natively supports burning ISOs at this ...


8

You check the MD5SUM. See https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowToMD5SUM. The iso at http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/download is guaranteed by ubuntu to be bootable, a valid MD5SUM therefore asserts that the iso is bootable.


8

Use Brasero Disc Burner: Or via the terminal, run the following command. sudo apt-get install brasero To copy a disc to an ISO image, click on Disc copy, then choose Image File as the destination.


8

DeVeDe This is quite a simple DVD authoring tool that claims to create simple DVDs that can be played on a home DVD player.


8

Why are you trying to "burn" an image to a USB stick? "burning" refers to a laser printing a pattern of holes into the surface of an optical medium, which obviously does not apply to your USB stick. Give Unetbootin a try, it may actually work (it works for Windows 7 as well). Alternatively, you could just copy the contents of the image 1:1 to your stick. ...


7

I believe that right-clicking on an .iso file will give you the option to burn the disc image: It is called Windows Disc Image Burner, and it's a default feature available in Windows 7 and the Windows 8 Consumer Preview. If not just install a .iso burning tool in Windows 8. I believe Isoburn does work on Windows 8. WinIso is also suppost to work in ...


7

K3b is my favorite burning application for Linux. K3b's interface would be very familiar to someone with a background in Nero on Windows. I heartily recommend K3b. Click here to install or run the following: sudo apt-get install k3b I have had trouble with Brasero making coasters in the past, and its minimal approach to output prevented me from discerning ...


6

While Brasero is probably easier, if you're interested, here's how to create an iso from the command line using mkisofs: genisoimage -r -J -o cd_image.iso /directory The -r and -J tags allow for long filenames. -o stands for output, followed by the output file and directory. Afterwards, you can mount the image using mount, or burn with wodim. The ...


6

K3b is a CD and DVD writing ('burning') application and is available from the Ubuntu Software Centre. Key Features include Write data disks Write audio disks Write 'images' to disk (e.g. Linux distributions) Copy disks Rip and encode audio CDs Source


5

Just use the pendrive installer, no need to extract the image. Why does the Ubuntu image seem to be a WinRAR file? WinRAR has an option to show the contents of an ISO file. When you install WinRAR it associates itself with ISO files as well, so can easily open them. To create the bootable USB drive you don't have to open the image though and therefore don't ...


5

If it is just for making a backup you can use the split command to split the file into 2 or more parts. Burn the parts to several 4.7 Gb discs. You can use cat to restore the parts to 1 file. Another method would be to unpack the ISO and burn the files to several disc.


5

I've used Brasero for this. It's fairly trivial. Just make an image of the DVD, then burn the image to a blank one.


4

Well it depends on what you want to do If you want to unarchive the iso to files then select Burn Contents (creating a bootable ISO) If you want to burn the iso file as a file then select Burn as file. This will copy the ISO file as whole to the CD.


4

Performing a cryptographic hash verification of the ISO file you downloaded consists of the following steps. Open a terminal and type the following: sudo md5sum Note: there's a space after the md5sum. Now open Nautilus and browse to the folder containing the ISO file. Drag the ISO file to the open terminal window. This will insert the path / filename ...


4

I recommend sticking with Brasero. I presume you're trying to burn a non-standard disk image format and that's why Brasero is asking for cue2toc and cdrdao. You could just install those packages and be on your way: sudo apt-get install cue2toc cdrdao Although I admit that this is a paper cut in usability and you should report it as a bug here: ...


4

If you have a good-enough CPU, install VirtualBOX, and setup some Virtual Machine. Make it point to the ISO as the CDROM, and configure it to first boot from CDROM. It willboot from the ISO file directly, without actually having to burn the file. Another thing that I always do, as a general practice, is to actually put the ISO on a USB key and boot from ...


3

Open Shot's .dvd files are basically the same as .vob files for DVD creation. However Open Shot has no DVD authoring module yet. In the meantime it is recommended to import the .dvd files to a dvd authoring application such as: dvdstyler devede


3

The bit version of the CD or DVD does not matter where you burn it. You can even burn a PC version of the 32 Bit or 64 Bit on a Mac. Same for windows and same if you are burning a 32 bit on a 64 Bit PC or vice versa. What does matter is if you want to run it afterwards. Is it recommended to download the 64 Bit version if you have a lot of ram and the whole ...


3

Tom is correct in that when using Ubuntu from a Live CD, you must keep the Ubuntu Live CD in the drive the entire time. You basically have two options: 1- If you have and can connect a second CD/DVD drive, you can run the Ubuntu Live CD from one drive and burn with the other. 2- Create a Live USB (again, as Tom mentioned).



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible