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197

The Ubuntu Wiki has a very thorough guide that is well illustrated and covers many possible scenarios. The essence of that page is that you first need a Launchpad account, then press Alt+F2 and enter ubuntu-bug packagename. In 11.04 and later you can enter ubuntu-bug -w and click on the affected window. There are also methods described on that wiki page ...


193

If it locks up completely, you can REISUB it, which is a safer alternative to just cold rebooting the computer. REISUB by: While holding Alt and the SysReq (Print Screen) keys, type REISUB. R: Switch to XLATE mode E: Send Terminate signal to all processes except for init I: Send Kill signal to all processes except for init S: Sync all mounted ...


192

When a single program stops working: When a program window stops responding, you can usually stop it by clicking the X-shaped close button at the top left of the window. That will generally result in a dialog box saying that the program is not responding (but you already knew that) and presenting you with the option to kill the program or to continue to ...


86

The most general, and comprehensive set of instructions can be found at this community-maintained help page. This answer essentially, consolidates that page, and hence it is advised that you read it, and if you are hunting bugs, it is required that you read it. Short version: Know the package at fault? go type ubuntu-bug <packagename> in a ...


85

Open a terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) and type: sudo rm /var/crash/* Then hit Enter. This will remove any old crashes, that might still be reported (in error). After a reboot/re-starting, any further pop-ups still need to be investigated.


70

General Alpha Information If you've been redirected here you've probably asked a question about an Alpha or Beta release of Ubuntu. Generally speaking we don't take questions about running or using unreleased versions of Ubuntu releases here since development releases change almost by the hour and usually it's broken and alpha testers are expected to give ...


47

You can make the shortcut Ctrl+Alt+Delete open the System Monitor, with which you can kill any unresponsive applications. Open up System ➜ Preferences ➜ Keyboard Shortcuts and click Add. In the Command field, enter gnome-system-monitor. Name the shortcut whatever you want. Click Apply and then click where it says Disabled. Now hit the keys ...


37

Thanks for your interest in the Ubuntu error tracker project. As of Precise 12.04, this behavior and workflow changed. As I discovered in Bug #993450 “Apport fails to submit bug report”, by default apport no longer opens a bug report (and it is awkward but not impossible to get it to do so). Apport never created bug reports post-release. When a release ...


32

Disabling error-reporting is not a desirable solution! Ubuntu has an error reporting system called apport which tries to catch all program crashes in the background and report them to help the developers. It seems that after a dist-upgrade there are stuck some reports that are tried to be resubmitted somehow, but disabling apport is not a desirable ...


32

The most current guide appears to be ReportingBugs - Community Ubuntu Documentation It looks pretty up to date to me, and I think it would be redundant to put that information on here.


30

Forums If your question on Ask Ubuntu was linked to this answer then this is where you should probably go to repost your problem. The Ubuntu Forums' Development & Programming section is a good place to start. The precise subforum depends on the release, but at the moment you want the Ubuntu Development Version. Take a look through the recent ...


30

Answering this question can get long and complicated, so I am instead going to point you to resources available instead of rehashing them here. Documentation Getting Set Up for Ubuntu Development How to Fix Bugs Tutorials We run events throughout the cycle to help people just like you, specifically we run Ubuntu Developer Week in IRC, which is a live ...


28

If you're getting a lot of freezes, there might be something wrong with your hardware. I used to get hard lockups every 48 hours due to some less than optimal RAM. Memtest86+ showed the fault after 40 minutes of testing. Swapped the RAM out for some more (under warranty) and I'm now at 32 days, 1 hour of uptime. Ubuntu doesn't tend to leak its guts all over ...


26

Freezes such as you have described can be both software and hardware related and as you have found sometimes frustratingly difficult to diagnose. Hardware If this is a desktop PC look at your hardware-cards. For both laptops and desktops possibly acpi type issues. It might be useful to temporarily simplify your configuration to have just the graphics card ...


26

If you're having a X error (graphical subsystem), the X Debugging page is very useful: X/Debugging - Ubuntu Wiki Usually doing an ubuntu-bug xorg will get all the right information to Launchpad. Bryce adds: Yes, definitely a good recommendation. But also make sure to actually describe the problem. The most common mistake made in filing X bug reports ...


24

Also, sometimes it's simply the X-Server which hangs - a case I've most often found when you're using Compiz. If this is the case you can kill X, which will restart and drop you back at the log-in screen. The default sequence is Ctrl + Alt + Backspace Although this is turned off by default (presumably new-users were accidentally hitting it) and can be ...


23

When everything stops working, first try Ctrl + Alt + F1 to go to a terminal, where you can likely kill X or other problem processes. If even that doesn't work, try using holding down Alt + SysReq while pressing (slowly, with a few seconds between each) R E I S U B. This puts the keyboard in raw mode, ends tasks in various states, syncs the disks, etc, and ...


23

My first favourite when total freeze occured - Alt + SysRq + K. That combo kills X, and returns me to the graphical login screen. If that doesn't work, try Alt + SysRq + R E I S U B.


22

This is not about the particular bugs you've filed, but general good practice for getting bugs dealt with in a timely manner: Make sure you've filed the bug report in the correct source package. Bug triagers and developers tend to be subscribed to the bug mail of packages they're interested in or responsible from, so for the relevant people to look into ...


22

If you know the application in question (specifically the package name), I would recommend using the ubuntu-bug command from a terminal. ubuntu-bug packagename will gather some automated information and take you right to the launchpad report a bug page, where you can describe the problem. It's also a good time to search for potential duplicates, and if you ...


22

IRC (Internet Relay Chat) #ubuntu+1 on irc.freenode.net #ubuntu-bugs if helping report/triage bugs


22

Before an upgrade, always test sudo apt-get --simulate dist-upgrade If you get an error about broken packages, don't upgrade.


21

(Source: Bugs/Importance (Bug Squad Documentation)) The Ubuntu Bug Squad is one of the driving forces for Ubuntu Bugs, and maintains a documentation of this for the reference of every person. For the sake of people who hate reading other sites, and for the few people who might be too lazy to click on the link at the beginning of this answer, I'll ...


19

Launchpad uses notification emails and Atom feeds to help you stay on top of the bugs that interest you. There are three ways to get bug notifications by email: subscribe to a bug subscribe to a milestone, project, package or distribution take a role that results in bug mail: bug reporter assignee commenter project or package ...


18

ubuntu-devel-announce mailing list When large changes are being made usually a developer will post on the ubuntu-devel-announce list. This list doesn't get many posts (compared to some of the other Ubuntu lists!) so for pre-release testers there is no excuse not be subscribed to it.


18

Jorge's generalized answer is a great introduction to jumping into Ubuntu development, but let's try to look a little closer at you specific issue... Apport's main upstream developer and Ubuntu maintainer are one and the same. This simplifies things for you a bit. Instead of having to learn about packaging and patch systems, the easiest path here is to work ...


17

Open your terminal and type: gksudo gedit /etc/default/apport And hit Enter. Change enabled=1 to enabled=0, then save and exit. To solve this problem, you can watch this YouTube video. See also: How do I enable or disable Apport?


17

Reporting a paper cut is just like reporting a normal bug, which is explained here. Once you've reported the bug according to those guidelines, there are a few more steps to follow to upgrade it to a paper cut. Add a task for the One Hundred Paper Cuts project by clicking on the "Also affects project" link at the bottom of the list of affected projects, ...


16

All bugs in Ubuntu have life cycles. As well, they each have a "Status" that helps to explain what its life cycle is. In Ubuntu, each bug as its life cycle continues has various statuses set on it. While this is all documented in extraordinary detail in the Triage Guide, I will (for now, as I dont have a huge amount of time to write up this process in ...


16

Keep an eye on package uploads Uploads to the archive are sent to a mailing list, named after the animal nickname, for example lucid-changes, utopic-changes, etc. Following this list can be useful to see when risky uploads are being uploaded so you can hopefully avoid problems before it's too late. Also the Archive Status tool is useful for showing the ...



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