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75

The most general, and comprehensive set of instructions can be found at this community-maintained help page. This answer essentially, consolidates that page, and hence it is advised that you read it, and if you are hunting bugs, it is required that you read it. Short version: Know the package at fault? go type ubuntu-bug <packagename> in a ...


35

Thanks for your interest in the Ubuntu error tracker project. As of Precise 12.04, this behavior and workflow changed. As I discovered in Bug #993450 “Apport fails to submit bug report”, by default apport no longer opens a bug report (and it is awkward but not impossible to get it to do so). Apport never created bug reports post-release. When a release ...


34

Open a terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) and type: sudo rm /var/crash/* Then hit Enter. This will remove any old crashes, that might still be reported (in error). After a reboot/re-starting, any further pop-ups still need to be investigated.


29

Answering this question can get long and complicated, so I am instead going to point you to resources available instead of rehashing them here. Documentation Getting Set Up for Ubuntu Development How to Fix Bugs Tutorials We run events throughout the cycle to help people just like you, specifically we run Ubuntu Developer Week in IRC, which is a live ...


23

If you're having a X error (graphical subsystem), the X Debugging page is very useful: X/Debugging - Ubuntu Wiki Usually doing an ubuntu-bug xorg will get all the right information to Launchpad. Bryce adds: Yes, definitely a good recommendation. But also make sure to actually describe the problem. The most common mistake made in filing X bug reports ...


22

This is not about the particular bugs you've filed, but general good practice for getting bugs dealt with in a timely manner: Make sure you've filed the bug report in the correct source package. Bug triagers and developers tend to be subscribed to the bug mail of packages they're interested in or responsible from, so for the relevant people to look into ...


21

(Source: Bugs/Importance (Bug Squad Documentation)) The Ubuntu Bug Squad is one of the driving forces for Ubuntu Bugs, and maintains a documentation of this for the reference of every person. For the sake of people who hate reading other sites, and for the few people who might be too lazy to click on the link at the beginning of this answer, I'll ...


19

If you know the application in question (specifically the package name), I would recommend using the ubuntu-bug command from a terminal. ubuntu-bug packagename will gather some automated information and take you right to the launchpad report a bug page, where you can describe the problem. It's also a good time to search for potential duplicates, and if you ...


18

Jorge's generalized answer is a great introduction to jumping into Ubuntu development, but let's try to look a little closer at you specific issue... Apport's main upstream developer and Ubuntu maintainer are one and the same. This simplifies things for you a bit. Instead of having to learn about packaging and patch systems, the easiest path here is to work ...


18

Launchpad uses notification emails and Atom feeds to help you stay on top of the bugs that interest you. There are three ways to get bug notifications by email: subscribe to a bug subscribe to a milestone, project, package or distribution take a role that results in bug mail: bug reporter assignee commenter project or package ...


16

All bugs in Ubuntu have life cycles. As well, they each have a "Status" that helps to explain what its life cycle is. In Ubuntu, each bug as its life cycle continues has various statuses set on it. While this is all documented in extraordinary detail in the Triage Guide, I will (for now, as I dont have a huge amount of time to write up this process in ...


16

Reporting a paper cut is just like reporting a normal bug, which is explained here. Once you've reported the bug according to those guidelines, there are a few more steps to follow to upgrade it to a paper cut. Add a task for the One Hundred Paper Cuts project by clicking on the "Also affects project" link at the bottom of the list of affected projects, ...


13

Murat's answer is correct for good processes. For your specific bug it seems to be assigned to the wrong component. gnome-vfs is the old unmaintained thing, the current GNOME piece that handles this sort of thing is actually called gvfs. Your problem is likely that no one is looking at bugs for something we haven't shipped in a while. Fixing the component ...


13

A bug is: A software bug is the common term used to describe an error, flaw, mistake, failure, or fault in a computer program or system that produces an incorrect or unexpected result, or causes it to behave in unintended ways. (From Wikipedia) Here is another good definition of what constitutes a bug. Either: The program did not behave according to ...


12

I have had the same problem when upgrading from 12.04 to a higher version. As it turns out, Ubuntu has an error reporting system called "apport", which was deactivated in stabled releases of Ubuntu until 12.04 and is reactivated now. Manuel Jose has made an excellent quick-guide how to turn off the error reporting in apport


12

As Dobey mentioned, in order for a patch to be accepted into an already released version of Ubuntu, it must got through the Stable Release Update (SRU) process. The bar to entry for SRUs is quite high. A simple way to sum up the thinking behind the process might be: "The bug we know is better than the bug we don't know about." In practice, that means that ...


11

The software uses several data sources for a bug report. One such source is your user environment. This is the content of the file /proc/PID/env where PID is the process ID of a specific process. In the case of a networking program this might reveal to which servers you are connected. Some software allows it to enter a password as commandline option. Also a ...


11

To expand on fluteflute's answer, which is mostly right, the automated retracer does not set the bug public. It merely adds a stack trace to the bug so that it is more clear where the problem lies. The sensitive information is kept in the bug report, as it can be invaluable to a developer working on a fix. The bug is reviwed by members of the ...


11

It's as easy as going here and filling the 2 or 3 fields that are there. Command line is not the only way. Alternatively, you can use this (replace PACKAGENAME in the URL with the package name. For example: unity, gnome-shell, etc): http://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/PACKAGENAME/+filebug?no-redirect It's mentioned in this part of the Ubuntu ...


10

If you want it to go anywhere, don't just file a bug. Of course you should file a bug on Launchpad but that's really just the start of the process of something inherently upstream like this. Find out what it does Look at the code find out what it's supposed to do. If you don't need it, why is it there? Is something else doing its job now? If it's ...


10

Individual Applications For individual apps, the best way is not Brainstorm, but filing a bug requests or feature request in the individual applications. Some upstream development portals might be having explicit feature for asking user ideas but most of them use their bug tracker for that. Example, you want a new feature in Synapse (the kick-ass launcher ...


9

Open your terminal and type: gksudo gedit /etc/default/apport And hit Enter. Change enabled=1 to enabled=0, then save and exit. To solve this problem, you can watch this YouTube video. See also: How do I enable or disable Apport?


8

Disabling error-reporting is not a desirable solution! Ubuntu has an error reporting system called apport which tries to catch all program crashes in the background and report them to help the developers. It seems that after a dist-upgrade there are stuck some reports that are tried to resubmitted somehow, but disabling apport is not a desirable solution. ...


8

This is a kernel bug¹, so you'd want to use ubuntu-bug linux in a Terminal. You'd then want to modify the created bug report to add that you need to blacklist acer-wmi as a workaround for the wireless chipset not working as suspected. ¹ Technically it isn't a kernel bug but probably a combination of broken hardware, BIOS, and kernel drivers. On the ...


8

Three routes: Install Ubuntu in a VM. Pros: Your installation is persistent, and you can switch back and forth between the VM and your normal desktop with ease. Cons: It'll be slow. Use a LiveCD. Pros: Most straightforward, same method as when you first installed Ubuntu. Cons: No persistence of session, your environment is lost when you restart. ...


8

You shouldn't need to do this by hand. If you set a bug watch Launchpad can monitor upstream bug reports and set the status automatically. For this to work the project upstream needs to have it's bug tracker registered in Launchpad. (You can always add more if it's missing) When you do this Launchpad will then track the bug in Ubuntu and upstream. That ...


8

So, in the example you've supplied, the bug is filed against the kernel package for the Ubuntu operating system. You can tell this by looking at the package listed under the 'Affects' block. In this case, it is linux(ubuntu) so it is distro specific. Depending on how it is filed, a bug may not get the attention it needs. If it was filed against the 'Linux' ...


8

In case of crashes you have to set Banshee up to create a debug log. Short version from the link: killall banshee cd ~; banshee --debug 2>&1 | tee banshee-debug-log.txt Reproduce your problem and exit banshee and attach the resulting banshee-debug-log.txt to your bug report. There is also a faq on performance issues I wonder why there is a faq ...


8

Genuine ubuntu package are all the packages that you can install through Ubuntu Software Center. Packages that are installed from third party repositories (PPA) are not considered genuine. This mechanism is just to distinguish bug reports of packages that are officially available in Ubuntu repositories from the ones that the end-user has installed from an ...


8

Coredump.gz is the (compressed) memory accessible by the program that crashed. It is a binary file. Coredumps are a treasure trove, with all sorts of private data to be mined. Coredumps can be viewed by running 'gdb': gdb --core=mycoredump Of course, you will still need the debug packages associated with this core. You can, then, generate a stacktrace ...



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