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Hatchet, You've provided some other steps I can perform, so kudos for that. I have asked a very similar question to you, as I have had the same problem. In an nutshell, basically I think it has to do with writing/recording on the boot file. When I have attempted to do the same as you (on both the previous HDD and a newly purchased SSD) I get the same ...


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Run the following commands to fix the problem: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get purge libssl-dev Take note of what packages are to be uninstalled. If the output lists 13 packages to uninstall, you can re-install everything using the following command. Otherwise, copy and paste each line, one-by-one after this command to reinstall everything. sudo apt-get ...


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There's an issue with the i915 driver in kernels 3.15 and 3.16, to check if you hit this bug, post the output of grep -E "Linux version|render ring" /var/log/syslog and append it to your question. In case you are affected, you need to either apply a patch to your kernel or use the upcoming 3.17 kernel.


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I have similar problem I have bought an Asus X552E, AMD A4 with Radeon HD 8670M gpu. I want to install ubuntu 14.04 on it but I have a strange problem. when I start installing, the LCD of laptop encounters with graphical problems. it shows the screen in pixel pixel format as if the gpu is out of order! but when I reboot the laptop and use Win 8.1, there is ...


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Enabling UEFI in itself does not increase the boot speed. If it does it is marginal. If you refer to "fast booting" on Windows for the quick reboot: this used to be called hibernation. Ubuntu supports hibernation and when using it starting the system is pretty quick in starting. If you want to enable UEFI see our official document. It should answer all ...


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Press 'e' at boot menu. Add the command nolapic after ro in the boot options. You can add this to grub file: Edit your grub.cfg and change GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash nolapic" Save file, then run update-grub.


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I am answering the part of the question that deals with the issue "I can't even resume Windows". I was also having this problem... in a system with dual-boot installation of Windows 7 and Ubuntu (actually Linux Mint 17 64-bit!), I have a modern system (Gigabyte motherboard with UEFI bios) and can selectively boot the Windows boot manager, the GRUB loader, ...


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I had similar problems with the NVIDIA driver initially in my machine. I switched to NVIDIA's legacy driver version 173.1439. It seems a lot more stable in two weeks of use. I found it as the second choice in Software & Updates – Additional drivers. This option replaces your driver but you can roll it back if need be.


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This could be fixed by adding the nomodeset value to the grub boot options. To do so open the file: gksudo gedit /etc/default/grub then look for the line GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" The quiet splash options may or may not be there, and there may be additional options, don't touch those and add to the end of it nomodeset ...


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I fear an issue may ocurr when you try to format the Window's 8 and run straight Ubuntu. I had the same problem with my laptop, and I was faced with an error message saying there was no boot device. I have tried multiple Linux versions to no avail. From what I gather, Window's 8 either locks down the master boot file once installed, or stores it on 'an ...


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I was seeing the same problem - with the extra info that I have used blkid (and tune2fs) to check the UUID, and it's an exact match. Listing /dev/disk/by-uuid also showed the expected UUID sitting there. The drive is perfectly mountable within busybox as well. All the normal files expected in [/mnt]/boot/ are present (for kernel 3.13.0-36). I got the ...


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Try pressing CtrlAltF1 Then run the following commands: sudo service lightdm stop sudo service lightdm start


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Well, there should be some hardware problem, but let's find what it is :) The first thing coming in mind is that the memory is broken. To verify that, during ubuntu live-cd boot you can choose memory test. In older versions that was just 'memtest' option, in the new ones you need to go to additional options by F6. If that is not a memory problem, then I ...


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When you chroot into your system, regenerate your initial RAM-disk. It is likely that modules are missing causing this problem to occur. update-initramfs -k all -c Before chrooting, mount /dev, /proc and /sys inside chroot: mount -t proc /proc /mnt/proc mount -o bind /dev /mnt/dev mount -o bind /sys /mnt/sys I'm assuming here that you mounted your ...


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I think a couple of minutes of boot time is a bit much than normal, but is still possible most than likely on some old machines. You didn't include your hardware configuration details, but the measured time is more than 115 sec, which makes me think that at least you have a hard drive disk in there not a solid state drive. If you are looking for ...


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Yes, I found this is a tricky issue and the web keeps telling you how to make a bootable install disk, or to just hold down the option key, but there's more to it than that. The trick I found is after the install, you have to tweak the resulting disk and use rEFInd to boot the linux image via GRUB. I asked the same question and after much research managed ...


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Sounds like you've got some leftover Xubuntu packages messing with your configs. Try this in a terminal: sudo apt-get purge abiword abiword-common abiword-plugin-grammar abiword-plugin-mathview alacarte bison blueman brltty-x11 catfish espeak exo-utils flex fonts-droid fonts-lyx gigolo gmusicbrowser gnome-system-tools gnome-time-admin gstreamer0.10-gnomevfs ...


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Thanks. Yes, I realize now that I deleted the partition. I suppose my task now is to figure out how to redo the partition - I suppose using Gparted or? - and then get help to re-install Windows and then as suggested know what I am doing before trying the Dual Boot installation again. To both of your command line suggestions: sudo gdisk -l /dev/sda Found ...


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This article has a detailed recent tutorial describing the process. Giving it a look might just solve your problem and give you some required knowledge.


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restart mac with both USB plugin, hold down the "Option" key until you see the Startup Manager. press the right or left arrow keys on the keyboard to select the bootable USB drive. press the Enter key to boot from the USB drive. after that, during the installation manager you could chose drive to install ubuntu, soo chose the second one and follow the ...


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I assume you want to boot an OS (Ubuntu) from USB. In this scenario all the data is loaded into your system memory and whenever you restart the computer all your local data will be lost! But there is a workaround, if you create a Persistent Live USB. The persistence allows you to keep your preferences and data even after reboot so you can install ...


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I think there should be some BIOS settings issue, make sure you enable legacy usb boot in BIOS. Also enable UEFI boot mode. I guess the boot order is set to usb first, or you keep pressing F12 / F8 on bootup to choose the usb device to boot from.


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This error message has nothing to do with your disks, EDID refers to identification table of your digital display. So it can be a problem with your monitor genuinely reporting a bad EDID or a bug in your graphic drivers (e.g: bug #712075 or bug #1240882). If your system behaves correctly after booting the kernel. I'd not worry too much about this issue.


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The problem turned out to be with lightdm after an upgrade. I was able to get it working with the following commands: sudo apt-get install ubuntu-session (I'm not sure if this is needed, I ended up not using lightdm anyway) sudo apt-get install gdm (Select gdm from the list) sudo dpkg-reconfigure lightdm (Select gdm from the list) reboot This solution ...


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I have the same problem. I think this may help http://strnor.ru/?p=934 (if you can translate from russian). Shortly: you should start installation without changing partitions (without option "something else") and it will run with no problems, or you must create a special 512Mb partition for EFI (look through pictures http://strnor.ru/?p=934). I'm going to ...


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This error message indicates you likely have a hardware problem with your system. This problem could be with the drive itself (it is not unheard of for even a brand new drive to have a fault), or with something else such as your computer's motherboard. Troubleshooting steps which could help narrow it down include trying the same on a different drive ...


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In order to make your system faster, you could try the following: Install the proprietary AMD driver, so the APU speed can be regulated. Open Software & Updates, go to Additional drivers and select fglrx. Install the packages preload and prelink. These take certain actions to make the system faster. Execute sudo apt-get install prelink preload in a ...


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I had the same problems that you now explain with my first Ubuntu installation. From my experience, this usually comes with a defaulty installation on the bootable usb stick. I just did my installation following the method I explain here, and worked perfectly. These steps are: 1 - Check the architecture (32 or 64 bits) of your computer. Somehow, despite 64 ...


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To dual-booting between Windows 8 and Windows 7 you must install the older OS first, make room for the second OS, and then install the newer OS. Once Windows 8 is installed, you’ll find a new boot menu that appears when the PC starts up. You must use this menu to pick between the Microsoft OSes installed on the PC.


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I faced a similar challenge - wanting to run Ubuntu from external USB storage and came here looking for answers. Eventually I figured it out, however: Here is a solution that worked for me. How to, finally, get Ubuntu to boot on a mac from external USB storage?


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Such behaviour is caused by a kernel bug introduced in 3.17-rc3, fixed in 3.17-rc6 (Revert "Btrfs: device_list_add() should not update list when mounted")


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Well, I spent a second whole day on it and now I've cracked it. I sincerely hope some other poor soul gets some value out of this. Here's a recipe that works (at least, on my iMac with Ubuntu 14.04): Boot with bootable USB, install Ubuntu Partition your USB as follows: 200MB EFI boot partition 200MB ext2, mount to /boot Swap space if you want it One or ...


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i have had this problem before. i fixed it by using the infamous boot repair disk. its a 64 bit copy but it runs on 32 bit laptop fine. here is the link. http://sourceforge.net/projects/boot-repair-cd/ it re installs grub and fixes the crashy thingy


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sudo apt-get remove --purge uswsusp This will solve the problem.


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I've never had luck with a straight external USB connection, but not long ago I picked up a Seagate GoFlex thunderbolt adapter and was able to easily boot a 27" iMac to ubuntu on an external SATA connected to it. I used rEFInd but not sure it was necessary. Seagate tries to create the impression that you will need to use one of their drives connected to it, ...


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Look for the ISO's with "amd64+mac" in the name. There are both Desktop and Server versions. Go to this page: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/releases/14.04/release/ to see the full list of available ISO's for download. Again, look for the "amd64+mac." It's faster to download them as torrents if you can. My aim is to convert three of these Mac Pros into Ubuntu ...


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According to upstart cookbook. Ubuntu currently employs a hybrid system where core services are handled by Upstart, but additional services can be run in the legacy SystemV mode. All upstart system jobs by default live in /etc/init/ while session job can be found in: $XDG_CONFIG_HOME/upstart/ (or $HOME/.config/upstart/ if $XDG_CONFIG_HOME not set). ...


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If you use both windows 8 and Ubuntu and you cant access win8 partitions from Ubuntu, just boot into win8, open Command prompt and type this: powercfg -h off And the problem will be solved.


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Finally got my Ubuntu. All I did was went back to my bios,instead of booting from my harddrve 1st boot,I let it boot from my flashdrive 2nd boot. I changed the order. Changed flashdrive to 1st boot,then harddrive to 2nd boot. Thats all it took. It took me a long time but I got Ubuntu now.


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First I have to say before loading Ubuntu Grub the computer need to know what device has the highest priority to boot. Usually this is the internal hard disk with the Ubuntu Grub, but you can change the device priority and set the CD to be the first device to boot so you'll boot from CD. To boot from a LIVE CD or LIVE USB, you have 2 options: Enter BIOS ...


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When you boot into recovery mode go to Menu > Administration > Driver Manager. Once it opens select the driver you wish to use. Restart, and your video should be working properly. -J


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Although not a full answer, a solution I have is to simply use a burned DVD copy instead of trying to use a USB if you are just trying to perform a LiveCD boot or Install. This method will not work if you want to run Ubuntu from USB to "carry it with you" as I do. Using a DVD I was able to boot into and install Ubuntu on my computer with no issues, however ...


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For Toshiba laptops it seems one can't boot from USB in the UEFI mode: See http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-1894515/toshiba-satellite-wont-boot-usb.html and http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/85143-35-toshiba-satellite-boot Since you want to remove Windows, it is possible to enable CMS/Legacy mode in UEFI/BIOS and boot from the Ubuntu LiveUSB. There ...


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From your comments above, it looks like you did a complete install of Ubuntu on the 16GB USB drive. There are two methods to put Ubuntu in an USB. The first is a LiveUSB that is used to install Ubuntu in the hard drive. The second is a full install, where the USB works like a hard drive. See What would be the differences between a persistent USB Live ...


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The terminal input language has been changed to English. Following the command, the terminal is questioning the user in french but the answer need to be in English (y orY instead of o or O). To fix this issue: Open a terminal Type locale and make sure everything is setup in English (or your native language) If not: Type sudo gedit /etc/default/locale ...


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The Could not find kernel image: linux error typically occurs on USB flash drive Linux installations if syslinux could not find the configuration file syslinux.cfg. This configuration file is used to tell syslinux where your kernel image and initrd files are located. In the following section we will cover some of the basic things to look for if you are ...


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I have a setup similar to yours (Dual boot SSD, storage HDD, but no backup HDD). In order to migrate your partitions to the SSD it would be ideal to simply clone the drive using CloneZilla as detailed in this post. This should enable you to also keep the existing data on your current HDD until you're sure the migration went well. I would also probably ...


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Why would you ask about neogrub and settings on Ubuntu forum ? Is neogrub part of Ubuntu ? Moreover neogrub is a pirated version of grub4dos as it does not comply to GPL ! Please supply link to source code of neogrub and your question will be answered.


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Turns out it actually was the SSD mounted to / giving problems. I've figured it out using the Live CD Recovery guide with $ sudo fdisk -l /dev/sdb Then I had to reinstall Ubuntu back onto the SSD using a USB key (see this). After the reboot, the GRUB turned out to be broken. I've fixed that using the boot-repair tool that I installed onto the live Ubuntu ...


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Boot from live CD/Flash and do steps: First of all check if you installed Ubuntu in /dev/sda5 (see gparted screen shot. It's installed on /dev/sda5). Then mount /dev/sda5 by the following commands: sudo mount /dev/sda5 /mnt for i in /sys /proc /run /dev;do sudo mount --bind "$i" "/mnt$i";done Now we mounted the /dev/sda5. just run below command to switch ...



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