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0

You can do this pretty easily by modifying your grub file. I use Grub Customizer for this purpose: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer After installation, start the program by opening the dash, and entering 'grub'. On the tab marked 'General Settings' you can set the ...


0

When I tried it via try ubuntu this is the error I am seeing; root@ubuntu:/var/cache/apt# sudo rm srcpkgcache.bin rm: cannot remove ‘srcpkgcache.bin’: Input/output error root@ubuntu:/var/cache/apt# sudo rm pkgcache.bin rm: cannot remove ‘pkgcache.bin’: Input/output error root@ubuntu:/var/cache/apt#


0

You need to boot to a live CD/USB and install boot-repair sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo sed 's/trusty/saucy/g' -i /etc/apt/sources.list.d/yannubuntu-boot-repair-trusty.list sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && (boot-repair &) Then find boot-repair in the dash Then click the "Recommended repair" ...


0

Please boot to your live cd or usb and open a terminal and type sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo sed 's/trusty/saucy/g' -i /etc/apt/sources.list.d/yannubuntu-boot-repair-trusty.list sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && (boot-repair &) Then open dash and search for boot repair Then click the ...


0

You can not recover Windows if you installed Ubuntu instead of it, you need a working windows partition to restore the recovery data. All the recovery partition does is use a earlier working version of Windows to fix any errors with the current install. Your Windows is gone


0

Having personally destroyed my boot loader time and time again, I have become rather familiar with the following HOW TO on the Ubuntu forums: [http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1581099] Refer to the chroot section, as that is where I have met my greatest success with this particular issue. If it does not work for some reason, try it again except ...


5

Good that you already solved the part of switching from Windows to Linux. The other direction is not that hard: There is the command grub-reboot that does just what you need - see below for detais: If your grub menu entry for the system you want to boot is "Windows", you would just do: $ grub-reboot Windows If you configure the hardware to boot after ...


0

You need to reformat the USB and put Ubuntu on it. When booting, you'll have to press a certain key to bring up the BIOS. There should be a menu that allows you to change boot order.


0

If you're trying to install Windows on the same drive you have already installed Ubuntu, keep in mind that you probably wont be able to dual-boot without making some changes to grub (or whatever boot manager you are using to boot Ubuntu). To avoid that I recommend installing first Windows and the Ubuntu (newer versiones detected the installed OSs and provide ...


0

ok I would check /var/log/syslog and dmesg which will display kernel log. wstein@valhalla:/home/wstein# sudo less /var/log/syslog wstein@valhalla:/home/wstein# sudo dmesg What a graphic-card are you using? Nvidia, Ati or Intel. I assume that drivers faild for install. Have you configured a framebuffer for grub? You can try an apt-get install -f which ...


0

I would check ~ZSW/.xsession-errors first, and then check /var/log/lightdm/lightdm.log for any errors. If I had to guess, I would say it was a permissions issue, and that the lightdm user can't see the files it needs to be able to start properly.


0

You removed your only key in the LUKS header, not the encryption. The passphrase unlocks a master decryption key stored in the header, which in turn decrypts your partition. Cryptsetup asks you for that passphrase, but finds no matching encrypted key in the header since you removed the only keyslot that stores it. There's no way you will ever decrypt that ...


0

Maybe you must go to bios option, and configure advance boot option, change boot mode from CSM boot to EUFI boot option, save setting and restart.


0

Hmm I had some issues with secure boot being on. However, try removing the option to view boot manager from Windows. Windows cannot handle more than one boot record on UEFI, no matter what you do. You can change the boot order via MoBo BIOS by selecting the UEFI option under your boot system menu. you should see something like an onboard PXE IPv4 and ...


0

I have re-installed Ubuntu since all the important files were on a separate partition. I think this whole thing was somehow connected to me using NVIDIA binary driver - version 331.38 from nvidia-331 (proprietary,tested). When I opted for it, a very similar behavior occured on my fresh install, but after being stuck in the tty login, this time Ubuntu started ...


0

I've had this error message before. Toshiba's fail-safe is: Power off device. Hold 0 (zero). While holding 0, power on device. While holding 0 you can press F2 (or F12) to enter BIOS (or the Boot Menu).


-1

In my experience, it may be your antivirus program preventing the installer for opening the file. Try disabling it.


0

Your issue is not easy without information about your HDD partitions and what exactly happened while you were installing the new OS Linux Mint. There is a quick solution for your issue: Use your live USB to boot your computer and follow the following steps : open a new Terminal(Ctrl+Alt+T), then type the following commands (Do not forget to press Enter ...


0

If you can't find the SD Card as a boot option in your bios, it may be unlikely that you can boot to it. The bios has an option to search for and specify which drive to boot to. Most modern computers will include a USB slot (or pen drive) as a boot option. You might consider getting a pen drive. You can likely find one twice the size for around 10 ...


0

Use live Ubuntu and install gparted software and it will mount all the drives as well as microsd card and from there you can format your sd card and it will allocate as free space and then you will to boot another OS.


0

As far as I can tell, you have two options: You run a boot-repair via live media and it fixes everything. You uninstall Ubuntu, insert a Windows recovery disc, and use it to repair your booting problem.


3

Couldn't you simply run it in the background, inside a while loop: while true do [command] sleep [number of seconds] done So the construction would be: Add a line in /etc/rc.local to call your script (your ShellScript.sh) + "&" to make it exit Run the commands you want the ShellScript.sh to execute in a while loop (inside Shellscript.sh): ...


0

Use windows 8 CD or live USB. Boot into CD/USB and select 'REPAIR' windows. Select the repair with Command prompt(CMD). Type the below commands to get the windows boot loader to normal. Bootrec/fixmbr Bootrec/fixboot After it gives successful message restart.


0

Turned out to be graphic card driver problem. I removed the card from the computer uninstalled and then reinstalled the drivers and inserted the card again, reset unity and its back and fully functioning.


0

Sometimes the BIOS disk enumeration differs from grub's. If you get to a grub prompt, try looking at the hd1 disk and see if it is the one you expect (check avail partitions with the tab completion is one easy way). type set root=(hd1, TAB and the partitions will be listed. If you are getting the other disk, edit the hd1 s to hd0 s, try the boot with ...


0

it is simple and easy use "wubi.exe " which is easily available on Ubuntu website copy "wubi.exe" in C: Drive >> insert/ Plug Ubuntu DVD/Bootable Flesh Drive and Run "wubi.exe" it will ask user Name and Password to you give it and click on install so simple FYI use this Link: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WubiGuide


0

Look at this article to see how to Try Ubuntu. Make a backup of your Windows Installation and make sure you create a Windows USB stick (unless you have a Windows installation disk) alongwith your Ubuntu USB drive before going further. Secondly, yes you can install Ubuntu manually. Make sure that you do not modify the partition containing Windows. All of ...


0

Best is to reinstall GRUB in EFI mode (boot installation/repair media always using UEFI booting!) You can also try "rEFInd" - pretty good EFI boot manager. To install rEFInd in Windows: a) map EFI System partition using "mountvol" command to say z: b) copy downloaded rEFInd files to z:\refind, add boot entry for rEFInd c) reboot selecting rEFInd as ...


0

There should not be any restrictions for installing specific Operating Systems depending on any OS you have yet installed. Maybe - or even probably - you have to make some adjustments (e.g. adjusting the clock). But the system works.


0

You can choose 12.04 or 14.04 but not 13 because all versions of 13 (13.04 and 13.10) have reached EOL just like WindowsXP so they are no longer supported. 12.04 and 14.04 are LTS or long term support versions and will be supported for a few years. Picture from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Ubuntu_releases


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I was experiencing the same problem, here is what i did, first i opened ubuntu 14.04 in UCK, and locked the kernel version. Then i installed all the other updates and clicked "build". Using unetbootin i created bootable usb and i confirmed that it works properly. I customised this iso with my favourite applications. Earlier i tried to correct the errors ...


0

First of all do a backup of your existing files in a different disk altogether or at least in a different partition, Focus on what's in your home folder. Then create a liveDVD or liveUSB. Boot from the medium just created and choose the install Ubuntu option. If the installer offers the "Upgrade Ubuntu" option then choose that. If not, choose the ...


0

Thank you for your answers. Finally I find out the problem is caused by the motherboard. Z77 Extreme 4 has some asmedia SATA and ubuntu does not support Asmedia. So I have to move all the hard drive s and DVD room to Intel SATA then the problem is fixed.


1

If you run Startup Disk Creator, you'll notice that it does three (four) things: Format the drive Copy over the data from the ISO to the drive (Add an extra casper1 file for persistence, if selected. dd does not give you persistence.) Install a bootloader It is not a GUI for dd (there are GUIs for dd, but SDC is not one of those). You can think of it as ...


-2

unable to open '/dev/sdb' Assuming that your DVD-ROM is /dev/sdb your problem is probably hardware related. Did you try running a hardware diagnostic? Check to see if that's possible in your BIOS before boot. In the meantime, however, a possible alternate solution to your problem may be to use a USB device instead of a DVD.


0

Change the boot order in you BIOS settings. Make sure that the drive you installed Ubuntu on is on top of the list. If it works, you can move the drive further down until it's not working anymore. That way you can see what's causing the problem.


0

I was wondering the same thing. See my question at Which arguments are passed to init scripts during shutdown. The reason is that all scripts in rc0.d are first called with start and then again with stop. This way you can order the final shutdown scripts independently of any other kill scripts to be executed during shutdown.


0

Don't use unetbootin. I've seen many reports of similar problems when people try to use it. Instead, if you've got an existing Linux (or OS X) installation, use dd to copy the image to the USB drive, as in: sudo dd if=imagefile.iso of=/dev/sdc This example assumes that /dev/sdc is your USB flash drive; change that detail appropriately, along with the ...


0

Semi-easy (I think) Grab your Windows 7 Install Disc and repair the Windows install. It will automatically recreate the boot table. Grab your Ubuntu Install Disc and open a commandline. In that, type sudo grub-install /dev/sda. Boot into Ubuntu and open up a commandline. Run sudo update-grub


0

If I turn on the UEFI firmware (disabling BIOS), will my operating systems be damaged in any way or will it be beneficial? It won't harm them, but it won't benefit them either. Operating systems that were installed in BIOS mode will just continue to boot in legacy BIOS mode even under a UEFI firmware, and behave as they did before. They won't ...


0

Try using "nomodeset" in the boot loader -Hold Left Shift during power on to get into GRUB -Press 'e' to edit the boot command line -Locate the Linux line that has other commands like quiet and nosplash -Add "nomodeset" (w/out quotes) to the line (I usually place it after "quiet") -Press F10 to boot -Once logged in, install the proprietary driver With ...


0

I'll be upgrading my ASUS eee to 14.04 (32bit) next week. I had problems with past kernal images. On a working version or from the command line I use; Linux Image clean lsb_release -a; uname -a; dpkg -l | grep linux-image sudo apt-get --purge remove linux-image-3.11.0-12-generic sudo apt-get --purge autoremove sudo apt-get clean The 1st line gives you ...


0

Did you manage to find a solution ? I've tried all sorts of thing, but stuck on the same problem as well. And this is also a fresh install.


0

The question is what do you wish to do? You obviously have a windows partition on that machine that linux fails to mount. Can you boot into that windows from GRUB? Do you wish to keep that windows partition on the machine or not? You can edit /etc/fstab in such a manner that linux will stop trying to mount that windows partition From a terminal ...


0

A fix for this is to use SuperGRUB2Disk to look for Os's and list partitions etc. You can mount it onto a USB it using Unetbootin Hope this helps


1

The commands below are more generic then for kernel version 3.13.0-35 only. 1. Mount the efi partition and copy the kernel files there $ mount /dev/sda3 /boot/efi $ mkdir -pv /boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu/ $ cp -uv /boot/vmlinuz-* /boot/initrd.img-* /boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu/ '/boot/vmlinuz-3.13.0-35-generic' -> ...


0

It sounds like you've already tried variations on the "bless" command, but I can at least confirm that it is possible to fix this on a setup just like yours. I too have a MacBook 4,1 and I just installed Xubuntu 14.04.1 (32-bit) on it a couple of days ago in a single-boot configuration. Right after install, I was having the 30-second white-gray screen ...


0

Try the following : Boot into Ubuntu using the Ubuntu CD and select Try Ubuntu without installing Once Ubuntu starts, open a terminal (ctrl+alt+t) and run these commands to install (and run) boot-repair : sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo sed 's/trusty/saucy/g' -i /etc/apt/sources.list.d/yannubuntu-boot-repair-trusty.list sudo ...


0

So when I (Shift + Reboot) over Windows it shows the menu for "Use a Device" from there I can choose the Ubuntu partition and after the reboot it loads grub2. So I start reading other questions/answers and I find a very long answer with different scenarios, I already tried the most except one, the BIOS... So I entered to my BIOS and in the boot section I ...


-1

I encountered a similar problem today. I unpluged sata cable and reconnected my hard drive to motherboard and it worked !



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