New answers tagged

1

People will be able to help you in a much better way if you can clarify the question . As a reader, I'm not sure what you want to do. Do you want to completely remove the Ubuntu and reinstall windows or keep both and dual boot ? A screenshot of your BIOS will also help you get better replies calling ubuntu a virus won't . Here is the list of things you can ...


-1

Go to your BIOS settings and go to the Boot tab and enable launch CSM Then go to the Security tab and disable Secure Boot control Tell me if it works


0

One option I found to activate previous boot logging is enabling persistent storage for journald, part of systemd. It will not bring back the previous boot log that I am missing, but all the others from now on will be stored, so problem solved for the future. To enable persistent storage: Change lines #Storage=auto to Storage=persistent in ...


0

Since I cannot add my findings as a comment, I'll add it as an answer. My setup: ASRock Z97 Extreme6 and Ubuntu 15.10 What I found out so far: It seems related to Z97 & similar chipsets: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1437492 Solutions mentioned there are: Power off, pull the plug & wait a bit, then power on again -> works ...


2

I found the problem. The laptop CPU (Celeron M360 @1.4GHz with a 400MHz bus speed) does not support PAE, some sort of memory management in the CPU. The only solution is to install a version of Ubuntu older than 12.04 or another distro.


0

you might want to use EasyBCD to put Ubuntu in the bootloader. that would be helpful.


0

When you are installing Ubuntu either from a bootable usb or a bootable dvd, you need to go into the bios and set the boot order so that your computer will attempt to boot from the Ubuntu installation dvd/usb first. If you did this already and you are still unable to boot into the Ubuntu installation, then the bootable device was made incorrectly. If you ...


0

Did you burn the iso file as an image? If you wrote it to the CD as a file, then when you insert the CD while in Windows you will see the ubuntu-stuff.iso as a file on the CD. If that is the case, it was not burned as an image. If it was burned as an image, then it may be your computer is not trying to boot off the CD. If you hold down the shift key ...


-1

ok...I'm a noob to linux so I'll describe what happened and what I did to fix it the best I can. I upgraded from ubuntu 14.04 to 15.10 and after it was finished all I got was a blank screen. I could get the bootloader where I choose either windows or ubuntu to boot up but only windows 7 would boot up. All I could get other than that was a grub prompt by ...


0

To expand on oldfred's comment, it does look like you've got EFI-mode installs of both Ubuntu and Windows; however, the Boot Repair message you quote implies that it was running in BIOS mode. Mixing boot modes (BIOS/CSM/legacy vs. EFI/UEFI) is seldom a good idea. In your case, it's best to enter your firmware setup utility and disable the Compatibility ...


0

Yes, the steps in the answer can be done from a terminal. The first thing you need to do is determine what partition you installed Ubuntu on. This can be done by using sudo fdisk -l It will probably be /dev/sda1 but look at the descriptions to the right when it lists the devices. Next, you need to unmount the device. This is done with sudo umount ...


-1

When you install Windows after installing ubuntu its assume that it's the only operating system that is in charge so try this : you just should boot an ubuntu in live mode and try this link to fix your GRUB issue try this link : https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair It's a brief description about how how boot-repair looks work


0

I carried out a fresh install of 16.04 on my ASUS GL552VW. The only additional GRUB parameters I entered (for installation and normal boot) were: nouveau.modeset=0 To stop Nouveau from taking over. Once I'd installed the nVidia 361.42 drivers, through the Additional Drivers tab in Software Updater, I had to disable Secure Boot. (Secure boot stops ...


0

So first of all i fixed my own problem ( a lenovo ideapad y580 ) by formatting the disk ( for information see the hdd information image in the question) and then doing a full erase with a seatools for dos bootable cd. Then i set the sata controller in the bios from "ahci" to "compatible" and reinstalled ubuntu 14.04 lts from the live cd. Now it mostly boots ...


0

probably corrupt way of making bootable usb. anyways. that is booting and installing Ubuntu. good, but not WUBI. wubi nowadays is not supported by Ubuntu Makers. so community made better & newer version! use this https://github.com/hakuna-m/wubiuefi/wiki go to the table and click on the thing for wubirelease for 14.04 magic!!


0

I solved it this way: Issue: When installing from USB the USB becomes SDA. The disks become SDB, SDC and so on. After removing the USB and rebooting the disks become SDA, SDB and so on and the system will not boot. Solution: Temporary add an optical reader connected to SATA (internal one). An external reader connected via USB will, most likely, create the ...


1

Use journalctl -bX where x is the boot you refer to, so -b0 is your actual boot and -b1 the boot before. Cant tell you how far exactly you can go but those two for sure.


2

Use journalctl Since journald contains all the logs, you can use the journalctl command with suitable filters. In the case of boot.log, which used to contain messages from the init system, you could do: journalctl -b0 SYSLOG_PID=1 -b0 shows messages from the current boot, -b1 from the previous boot, and so on. Without the -b option, journalctl will show ...


0

To add the boot.log back into the picture open a terminal (ctrl+alt+t) and do: sudo rm /var/log/boot.log sudo nano /etc/rsyslog.d/50-default.conf Ad the following lines at the end: # Logging for boot enabled local7.* /var/log/boot After saving and closing restart rsyslogd: sudo /etc/init.d/rsyslog restart Now test if the boot gets created logger -p ...


0

If your USB was made bootable and this is still occurring, check your BIOS settings to make sure the USB is set as a bootable device.


0

I would try using a bootable cd instead of the usb. Often times the bootable usb won't get made correctly (usually due to incorrect settings by the software you used to make the bootable usb) and because of that you will not be able to boot from it. This would make a lot of sense because 16.04 is still new. So if you can, try using a bootable cd. Then, try ...


0

Let's worry about question #1 first before dealing with question #2.. please check this site and do some research to see if all your hardware is compatible, can't really expect anyone to answer that one for you.. but heres some direction.. https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Lubuntu a few google searches will tell you how compatible your hardware is, once its all ...


0

Kubuntu is the version of Ubuntu that runs the K Desktop Environment, a fully-featured desktop OS, and is one of the "chunkier" flavors of Ubuntu. Once installed, it tends to run a bit faster than when booted off of a "Live" image, but it will still be slow on your (very limited) hardware. If you need an up-to-date (but lightweight) graphical environment, I ...


0

Ahh, but I'm not trying to lift those weights! I don't need to! I get that I have a very weak computer by modern standards. These are multiple PC104 cards in a card frame. The primary function here is to send less than 20 byte commands out over an RS232 port. The second function is a few more functions that fit in a single Ethernet packet out the over the ...


1

The speed of boot depends on two things: hardware and software. The more the software does (GUI, animations, background tasks, user management, shell execution, etc) the slower your computer. Kubuntu does a lot more than DOS. If DOS is working for you and does everything you need. If you need new features, Lubuntu may boot faster than Kubuntu. It's lighter ...


0

Most blank screen on boot issues for me historically have been due to an issue with the nvidia driver or another proprietary driver. Some programs can interact in odd ways that cause the error i.e. wine. If you have nvidia-current installed you may try removing it to isolate the error. Can you get to the Ubuntu login screen or does it go blank before?


0

Try to boot into the live cd (click try Ubuntu without installing) but pass the kernel this parameter: pci=noaer to disable PCIE Advanced Error Reporting. If you can get booted then you can try to find out which PCIE device is causing the errors. It is hard to tell from the video you posted what is actually going on in detail. You may also consider ...


2

The software you are mentioning isn't safer than the one built into Ubuntu. No need to purchase anything special. The software you are talking about uses "256-bit AES encryption" according to their website. You can have an encryption using the same algorithm using the "cryptsetup" on Ubuntu with a regular thumb drive, see for example: ...


0

Got it. I made the mistake of assuming all the background was part of the problem, when the problem was just that grub2 couldn't find the system: Kernel panic - not syncing: VFS: Unable to mount root fs... I imagine the cause is that I forgot to run "sudo update-grub2" after running "sudo update-initramfs." The solution turned out to be to boot to a ...


0

you just need install Boot-Repair for that put ubuntu CD and reboot the system and go to live mode and install sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair and then launch app you see this windows just click on recommended repair thats it for more you can see this ...


5

In Ubuntu 16.04 the boot.log file is still located in the /var/log folder as you can see here. The boot logfile is from today (2016-04-29). Maybe something went wrong when you installed Ubuntu 16.04 or have upgraded the operating system from Ubuntu 15.10 to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Alternatively you can examine the general boot behavior from the comprehensive ...


0

Second, now I am using Windows, do I need to have a disk partition? Yes. The Ubuntu installer supports creating partitions, but using it to shrink your Windows partition might be dangerous. I would recommend you use the Windows Disk Management Utility that's part of Windows (see here). You can then use the installer to create your new partition. ...


0

Ubuntu is completely free of charge. If you want to keep Windows and run Ubuntu, you will need at least one spare partition (or a new separate disk), and will need to install what is called a Dual-Boot system. On the installer you would need to choose the option to 'Install Ubuntu alongside Windows'. This is not always totally straightforward, especially on ...


0

Ubuntu Operating system is free You will need to partition your hard drive in order to use Ubuntu and Windows on the same computer. Please see this video for instructions. You can. If you're referring to the same computer, a grub loader will be installed allowing you to choose which operating system you want at start up. You cannot run Windows applications ...


2

First of all, is Ubuntu free of charge? Yes Second, now I am using Windows, do I need to have a disk partition? In general yes. Each installed operating system needs at least its own partition. Keep in mind: for testing Ubuntu or any other operating system it might make sense to check out a Virtual Machine like Virtualbox, VMware or similar. ...


0

Its very simple and works for me Insert Ubuntu cd and select try Ubuntu, connect to Internet. Open terminal ( Ctrl+Alt+T ), Login as root: sudo -i Find out your linux disk : fdisk -l Mount it: mount /dev/sdaX /mnt Recover: grub-install --root-directory=/mnt /dev/sda


0

Its very simple , this worked for me insert Ubuntu cd and select try Ubuntu, connect to Internet open terminal ( Ctrl+Alt+T ), login as root: sudo -i find out your linux disk : fdisk -l mount it: mount /dev/sdaX /mnt Recover: grub-install --root-directory=/mnt /dev/sda


0

You will need a Windows 10 cd/usb and boot to that. You will click on the repair link then troubleshoot.. then advanced options finally start up repair and it should have one entry with your windows listed choose that .. this will get you back into Windows then you can follow the other information in How to remove Ubuntu and put Windows back on? to remove ...


0

Hi you can find the information in below link hope will helpful to you How to remove Ubuntu and put Windows back on?


1

Ok .. Decided to give it Grub Customizer a try on a VM box so I didn't screw anything up. I was able to change the default kernel without any issues. Here is how I did it. In the General settings tab I clicked the pulldown for predefined. It listed all the kernels available. I chose the 3.19.0-58-generic and clicked save ... I rebooted into that kernel. ...


3

If you have EFI, then there will be an EFI System Partition (ESP) on the disk. This partition has to be mounted on /boot/efi, so that GRUB can use it. The partition: is formatted FAT32, is usually small (100MB < size < 500MB) will have the boot flag enabled contains an EFI folder could be labelled EFI by the OEM, but no guarantees I don't have one ...


0

It will work from usb if you add the acpi=off option to the boot command, both before and after the -- delimiter. To get the command line in legacy mode: press the "down" key when the keyboard icon comes up, select English. Make sure "Try Ubuntu Before Installing" is highighted then press F6. Don't select anything in the menu that comes up, press esc. The ...


0

Maybe you don't have the drivers for the dedicated graphic card and Ubuntu use the integrated, that may be embedded into the CPU, so it gets hot and the fan try to cool it down. I'm not sure of this but for me, it makes all sense.


0

I have this same problem which is why I dont't natively use Ubuntu. You need to manually setup fan control. The answer to this question should help you out: How to control fan speed?


-1

Same problem. I held the shift key down during boot and got to a menu where I chose "advanced options," then selected "upstart." At least I can do my office work now. Unknown how to make systemd, the new type of booting up, function.


0

I just tried, and was able to boot the Ubuntu desktop 16.04 AMD64 image, written to a USB flash drive, with Secure Boot active on an HP EliteDesk computer. Thus, I can say with some certainty that this image is properly signed for Secure Boot. Several possible causes of your problem spring to mind, some of which you could correct but others you could not: ...


1

You can try to find out what is taking the most time with systemd systemd-analyze blame


1

Im not familiar with that program but if I want my computer to boot to a different kernel I just manually edit the grub file located at: /etc/default/grub Look for GRUB_DEFAULT=0 (or whatever your default is set too) Change that line to the kernel you want loaded ... looking at your list there it looks like 0 would be the standard 4.4.8 and 3 would be ...


0

Not sure what version of windows you are using but you could try putting in the disc and try the repair .. it should overwrite the grub and reinstall the windows boot loader. If you are using Windows 10 you click on the repair link then troubleshoot.. then advanced options finally start up repair and it should have one entry with your windows listed choose ...


0

It turns out this problem is associated with an installation of a 64bit Ubuntu using a USB created by unetbootin.. Creating a disk using Linux Live USB creator and installing from it fixed the problem. I still wonder what was wrong with the init, if someone has any insight regarding this error...



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