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0

Can you use a USB drive? If that's the case, I suggest you to try UNetbootin. It works in Linux, OS X and Windows operating systems and creates bootable USB drives for a lot of Linux distributions, including Ubuntu.


0

The problem doesn't seem to occur in Trusty. So it seems to be fixed.


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Newer grub packages now provide to add files with own modifications at /etc/default/grub.d/ . In my case I was able to modify grub with my packaging by: thopiekar@t91:~$ cat /etc/default/grub.d/emgd.cfg GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="$GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT vmalloc=256MB selinux=0 vga=current" Thank you all anyway :)


0

Apparently the problem I'm having has to do with the number of partitions. When I go to Disk Management, there are 4 partitions - OEM partition, Recovery (primary), System (primary) and Win 7 (primary). I thought that the OEM one would not count towards the 4 primary partitions limit. But apparently it does. I could not delete any of these partitions ...


0

I had a similar issue, I found out I had unintentionally downloaded the OS to the USB. I was somehow able to use the OS while the USB was plugged in, but I don't remember how. Anyway, my simple solution was to just install from a CD.


0

Why do you need grub4dos to boot your machine? I would use Super Grub2 Disk that can do the same thing much easier.


0

It could be graphics problem, or problem with Unity. When your machine gets to that purple screen, try to press Ctrl+Alt+F2 and report if a terminal appears.


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try to do the following: - press this key combination simultaneously Ctrl+Alt+F2 - a regular command line screen will appear , type in your username and password as configured during install process - when the prompt turn to something like user@machine:~$ type this sudo pkill X beware that X is uppercase - then type sudo startx if this didn't work ...


-1

You can try Unetbootin for usb's. They generally work! Or, you can check here to do CD/DVD's: http://howtoubuntu.org/how-to-burn-an-iso-to-a-cd-or-dvd-in-ubuntu Hope this helps!


0

Like Agustin, I found that my issue was with the OS Prober. Doing one step better than his solution, I found this gist that will let you have your OSes but still hide the menu. You just need to download those two files, put them into /etc/grub.d, and give them the same permissions as the other templates in that directory. If you ever want to access your ...


0

So: The problem were: Grub bugs when the HD is the only slave IDE drive. You have to make your way to make it master. After that you have to re-install grub, witch i did tough installing boot repair in a live CD https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair Problem solved


0

I had a small problem that can be of help to you: HDMI, there is some problem with HDMI that if its not correctly configured after installation it will stay black all the time,my advice is to switch to VGA and see if the problem continues.


0

I am a relative newbie but have just rebuilt my old laptop with Ubuntu 14.04. If you have an internal DVD build a boot DVD on a friends machine. Boot from that and you will be able to check out your hardware is all ok or not! If no DVD then you may be able to build a bootable USB dongle but I have never tried. PS does your machine only have a solid state ...


0

here are some methods that will help you to recover system if kernel is remove by mistake http://askubuntu.com/a/28100/294611 http://askubuntu.com/a/46696/294611 http://askubuntu.com/a/100953/294611 all three answers above are different ways to do the same thing, try atleast one(since all are same). First read all the answers then try the method you ...


0

The problem turned out to be a hardware problem. I followed this manual to adjust the blacklist.conf file: http://www.thomas-krenn.com/en/wiki/Resolve_mei:_Init_hw_failure_or_mei:_initialization_failed Now the PC boots fine everytime.


0

When you install Ubuntu, the GRUB bootloader will replace the existing Windows bootloader, but it will not replace the HP Compaq notebook's splash screen that appears during boot before the Windows logo appears on the screen. The splash screen is a function of the motherboard that provides a visual cue for accessing the BIOS. Because the splash screen is ...


0

No. It won't replace the screen that say F12 for more boot options.it is because that screen is displayed by an independent software called Firmware BIOS. First displaying F12 option it will show you Grub where you can select Ubuntu and it's advanced options


0

That is od..I assume you are on Windows 8, try to boot to BIOS and disable System Protection. I have a feeling I experienced something similar when switching from Win8 to Ubuntu. Post back please, I'm wondering if my assumption was correct ;) Best regards!


3

The answer to your problem is to disable Fast Boot on Windows 8. To disable it - All Control Panel items -> Power Options -> System Settings Click on the 'Change settings that are currently unavailable' link to make the Shutdown options available and Untick the Turn on fast startup option. The reason for this is explained below with content from this ...


0

Try to constantly hit the ESC button on startup. After the BIOS screen has been shown and tries to boot the OS you should get boot options. One of these boot options on my laptop is "General" which means USB. That way you should successfully boot your laptop from USB and you'd be able to install Ubuntu on it. Success! Fred Handoko


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Strangely enough, last time I had this error was in the OSX Chameleon bootloader when I had installed it incorrectly. I'm inclined to think it's a kernel error or some other software related issue that a grub repair should fix.


0

you can use boot repair burn it as image on cd and leave it . it will repair every thing. http://sourceforge.net/projects/boot-repair-cd/ after that u can boot ubuntu again.


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Simply renaming both bootx64.efi in the EFI/Boot folder and bootmgfw.efi in EFI/Microsoft/Boot so that the firmware could not find either of it's default options caused it to use grubx64.efi which is the refind bootloader on this machine.


0

In Ubuntu, open a Terminal and enter sudo nano /etc/default/grub. Now you should see a line which says GRUB_TIMEOUT=0, meaning it'll wait 0s to boot the default OS. Set this to another value, e.g. 10 and save with Ctrl+O, exit with Ctrl+X. Now apply the changes with sudo update-grub.


0

Open and edit sudo gedit /etc/default/grub. You will see the following contents: GRUB_DEFAULT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true GRUB_TIMEOUT=10 You can change the GRUB_DEFAULT from 0 to any number, corresponding to the entry in the GRUB bootup menu (first entry is 0, second is 1, etc.) Set the value of the GRUB_TIMEOUT as 10 seconds ...


0

Use Ubuntu Boot Repair: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair Use unetbootin (http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/) to create bootable usb disc with the boot-repair iso file. Boot into usb and click 'automatic repair'


3

You need to apply the ISO to your DVD, not burn the ISO as a data file. Most burning suites will have an option like create dvd from disc image, that is what you'll need to choose, then browse for the ISO, insert a blank DVD, and click burn. You will then be able to boot the DVD, and install Ubuntu.


0

The log says: Syslinux MBR (4.04 and higher) is installed in the MBR of /dev/sdb. I think you've installed grub to the secondary hard drive. You should install in /dev/sda


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Did you install windows after linux? Linux is capable of setting up a grub which can boot all your operating systems if windows is already installed, but if windows is installed on top of linux it will reformat everything.


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Use Boot Repair Disk Open Terminal sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo sed 's/trusty/saucy/g' -i /etc/apt/sources.list.d/yannubuntu-boot-repair-trusty.list sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair Start boot repair disk and select stand recommended repair. This will fix everything!


1

I ran into the same issue with my system that has similar specs. I was able to get my system to boot by booting into recovery mode with the graphics fail safe settings enabled. Instructions for booting with low graphic settings Boot PC leaving SHIFT pressed to make the GRUB Menu show. Select Recovery Mode which will continue booting correctly until the ...


0

You can loop mount isofiles directly with GRUB2 by installing it to the MBR of the USB drive. You can also create UEFI bootable USB drives this way or combine both methods. Most of the other solutions are MBR/legacy PC specific and don't work reliably on UEFI machines. I recommend reading the documentation on the project site and related manpages (1, 2).


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You've got an EFI system. Did you follow https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI from the official Ubuntu help pages when you installed your system?


1

Things I've noticed from the boot chart: The bottleneck seems to be disk utilisation. You may have a slow hard disk. ureadahead is taking a long time to run while waiting for I/O. This indicates hard disk speed is a factor.


0

Also you can try to boot from a USB stick using this http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/ Sometimes it requires to download a couple of times the ISO to burn it without any faults.


0

Burn the image to disk, then when you boot to DVD drive, just simply follow the instructions to wipe the hard drive and install Ubuntu.


0

Some systems shipping with Windows 8 have trouble booting Ubuntu the way it is currently implemented for UEFI machines. You could try booting the live USB again and follow my instructions from this Q&A: UEFI machine doesn't boot Ubuntu through NVRAM bootcatalog. How to fix? Regarding the customization, if you haven't successfully booted Ubuntu from ...


-1

First enter your bios and change the bootup sequence to something like this: 1. Harddisk 2. CD-rom 3. USB 4. etc.. Then during boot press F12 to enter the one-time Boot menue! Otherwise your USB-stick will be named SDA that should be your (Primary) harddisk. Try that.


0

When I go into the Windows (flag + C) "change computer settings" "update / restore" "restore" "Advanced Start" "Restart" "Use a Device" "EFI USB Device" so it will come up after some time "System does't have any USB boot option. Please select other boot options" Sounds like there is an issue with the media you created. Could you please have a look at ...


0

Enable Secure Boot mode Hit Enter on "Select an UEFI file as trusted for executing" Browse to EFI/BOOT on your USB stick and select the corresponding file (you might have too put a 32-bit EFI file on there if your BIOS doesn't support 64-bit UEFI) Reboot


0

3 possible problems: Memory HD controller (or driver) HD itself. 2 possible solutions: As grub is still working, do the MemTest86+ Take the HD out of the computer, (that way you bypass the HD controller + driver) put it in an enclosure and hook it up to someone elses Linux PC and run fsck without mounting the drive! If you need exact commands, report ...


0

I just manually copied /boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu/grubx64.efi to /boot/efi/EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi and it worked perfectly with the Secure Boot off.


0

First please remake a bootable usb stick with unetbootin or imagewrite and try using another iso (ie the 32 bit version). If that fails you can try using http://www.plop.at/en/bootmanagers.html as a boot manager (make a usb or a cd with it) to boot a usb from it? Also if the keyboard does not work inside the manager try: search you bios/cmos configuration ...


0

I'm not certain, but it seems likely your cd/dvd (optical) drive isn't working. I recommend you borrow an external USB model from a friend, or even buy one. They only cost about $16 these days. I just looked this one up on amazon at that price which I purchased last year. It works fine. They can be very handy in service work, and if your internal ...


0

HOW TO DELETE PARTITION/FORMAT USB: sudo su fdisk -l to list and find drive, in this case /dev/sdb probably delete partition, then n to create new partition which i gave number 1 now format the usb: note that the last number is 1 from partition 1 mkfs.vfat -F 32 /dev/sdb1 here is the article: Open a new Terminal window. In most Linux systems there is a ...


0

Its kinda tricky, but I'm sure its possible. You should try to install GRUB4DOS Then you'll need a try with this commands or better add a boot entry to menu.lst file placed in a root directory of your hard drive, something like: title Boot My Ubuntu ISO file NOW! find --set-root /ubuntu-14.04-desktop-i386.iso map /ubuntu-14.04-desktop-i386.iso (0xff) map ...


0

Create a file /etc/modprobe.d/local-b43.conf containing the line options b43 allhwsupport=1 Then, run the following commands sudo rmmod b43 sudo modprobe b43 I think you are using a Broadcom (BCMxxxx) wireless card. The message is telling you to pass an option to the b43 kernel module to activate support for your wireless driver.


0

I'm slightly confused with what the actual problem is, and next time try and keep this forum for Ubuntu related Q/A only but I'll see what I can do. :) If the Windows partition is still in tact and it is just corrupt Windows files, you can download a copy of Ubuntu and burn it to a DVD/USB. From there, you can boot off it off the Live DVD/USB mode rather ...


0

I finally did it. The magical key that was necessary to boot from a usb stick was the right arrow key. I don't know why, but only by pressing that key the usb stick finally booted. Somehow my partition table was changed to uefi mode. My laptop tried booting in uefi mode but I don't have that so that's why it restarted over and over. I changed my partition ...


2

Here's my suggestion: isoinfo -d -i foobar.iso (get the Volume Size and Block Size) dd if=foobar.iso bs=2048 count=344064 of=/dev/sda (or whatever the usb path is) The bs and count is probably optional, but it's better to be safe. If you do a search, you'll find similar posts and solutions. Here's another example solution. How to burn a .iso to a ...



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