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GRUB 2 binaries include hard-coded references to their configuration files. I haven't really been keeping track of all the gory details, but as I understand it, there are two EFI GRUB 2 binaries for Ubuntu on AMD64/x86-64 systems: grub2-efi-amd64 -- This is the version of GRUB 2 that's used on computers that do not use Secure Boot. As I understand it, the ...


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Linux-tools and cloud-tools are not needed in most cases. You either install unneeded deb packages or install not all of them. If you need cloud-tools, then install linux-tools too. You can install just image and headers debs in most cases. But these errors do not really matter. If there were no other errors and uname -r shows the correct kernel version, ...


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Don't panic! you were installing an application which it might was trying to update your grub and you just canceled it, that's it! by using this: sudo dd bs=512 count=1 if=/dev/sda 2>/dev/null | strings you can see the first 512 bytes of the device, result would be something like this: ZRr= `|f \|f1 GRUB Geom Hard Disk Read Error you can see the ...


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To remove EFI entries from UEFI efibootmgr is used. You can list entries by sudo efibootmgr And remove entries by sudo efibootmgr -Bb <entry_number> Efibootmgr manual


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I think the 10Gb is for compiling you can clean it just by : 1. you should open the directory where you compile the source of kernel: example: cd /usr/src/linux after that use his command to clean all files genarated in the compiling process: make clean or in the case that you compile the kernel with make-kpkg you should clean it by: make-kpkg clean ...


-1

I tried all the possible solutions mentioned in comment area and other answers. Unfortunately none of them work. Solution that worked for me was re-install.


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You can download the iso here http://releases.ubuntu.com/12.04/ (the second link). In win7 in order to burn thw iso file: Insert a recordable CD, DVD, or Blu‑ray Disc into your disc burner. Open Computer by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, and then clicking Computer. In Windows Explorer, find the disc image file, and then ...


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This link is a list of Old Ubuntu releases: Old Ubuntu Releases


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To clean your Grub entry you have to decide which menuentry to remove, First let's edit the custom file script in the /etc/grub.d dir contain same content of your grub.cfg. gedit /boot/grub/grub.cfg Copy all contents and go to the file /etc/grub.d/40_custom sudo gedit /etc/grub.d/40_custom Append the copied content to the lines founded in the ...


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Thanks, I couldn't figure out the EasyBCD thing, I think it was creating a grub boot for the SSD where Windows is installed. Instead when BIOS is booting, I select the SSD where Linux is installed and it loads, likewise I do the same for Windows.


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Simple: There is none ;-) Dual-Booting just means that you will on bootup (after powerbutton is prssed and BIOS showed POST messages) be NOT greeted by thw Operating System as you have two installed. Instead you will be given the option to chose which one to start (Actually you can even dual-boot without that chosing-screen but let's ignore that for a ...


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Problem solved! Because I moved the swap partition, it had changed UUID. The mismatch in fstab caused the delay, it seems. Found the answer here: Very slow boot with Ubuntu 15.04


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Have you tryed enter tty pres ctrl + alt +f6, and type this in the tty: sudo apt-get install LXDE and then type this in startx and then push start button left corner and the preferencs and the upper gfx settings adm and set all to default, and reboot and it might work fine this way.


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I hade same problem. I REMOVED THE GRUB. Just download widows 8 or 10 from another pc. Burn the iso into the USB with Rufus. Boot from USB click troubleshooting, command prompt type: Bootrec /fixmbr. Windows will start normally without grub(Ubuntu) . You can reinstall Ubuntu again.


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This is done by booting into text mode: make a backup by running the command below: sudo cp -n /etc/default/grub /etc/default/grub.orig If for some reason you want to revert to original settings, just run command below in terminal: sudo mv /etc/default/grub.orig /etc/default/grub && sudo update-grub To get started, press Ctrl+Alt+T to open ...


0

It seems like a filesystem error.You follow below steps it will help you sure: 1)Boot your machine with ubuntu live cd and select try ubuntu 2)Install Gparted application in it via internet 3)After installation open Gparted tool 4)Select your hard drive in Gparted tool and select first partition and right click and choose "check" option and then ok >> apply ...


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I don't think you'll find such tool, eventhough you can convert the .vmwarevm to .iso this doesn't mean this iso will be used as live cd or installation cd. I really don't know why you want to do that?! Instead you have the option to create a Live CD of your running system in Ubuntu, you have many number of tools that give you the ability to create live CD ...


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This worked in my case: sudo dd if=ubuntu-14.04.2-desktop-i386.iso of=/dev/sdb


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One possible cause may be incorrect partition alignment. Proper partition alignment is essential for optimal performance and longevity. This is due to the block nature of every I/O operation on the hardware level as well as file system level. The key to alignment is partitioning to (at least) the given block size, which depends on the used ...


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As the_Seppi stated, using the the bootrec.exe /fixboot and /fixmbr should work. Sometimes the boot flag can be removed from the partition to boot from. Try creating a live USB of GParted and look for the following: You will notice that the boot flag is on my 2GiB boot partition. If you do have to add the boot flag back, reboot back into recovery mode for ...


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Considering that you are running Windows 10 and the last version of Wubi said that it does not support anything higher than 7, I would say that it could be dangerous to install Ubuntu this way. But hey, as long as you back everything up on your Windows partition and are willing to reinstall it all from scratch, I'd say give it a try! Sometimes the best way ...


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The bios_grub partition is needed for enabling Legacy BIOS booting in GPT/UEFI setups. If you're booting with UEFI, which I, for the sake of simplicity, assume you do, you won't need it at all. You can use the existent SWAP partition for all installed Linux systems, as they can't be booted simultaneously. If you don't want a shared /home, the only thing ...


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I recommend you either install 14.04 LTS (Long term support) or 15.04. It is quite simple to install over the previous installation, just select "Erase disk and install Ubuntu" in the graphical install.


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All you need to do is download 64 bit Ubuntu 14.10 - choose the ubuntu-14.10-desktop-i386.iso file. Burn it onto an empty disk. Choose the option to install the distro over the present one and it'll do exactly that for you. That's all there is to it.


-1

I own a Toshiba Satellite L15W-B1302 currently running Ubuntu 15.04, using Gnome. I had a lot of issues installing Ubuntu on my laptop until I found that I needed to uncheck secure boot in BIOS. Before I did this, the only time it would boot was from the liveUSB I was using to install. At first I tried to dual boot and figured this might be the issue, then I ...


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So, below is what I did: I used Live Ubuntu and fired up gparted and did two partitions: sda1 ext4 Ubuntu (with boot flag) sda2 fat32 Red Hat Next, I used the RHEL Boot CD, and it first asked, “What type of devices will your installation involve? I choose the first one, “Basic Storage Device”. It then asked “Which type of installation would ...


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First, if you intend to dual-boot with an already-installed Windows system, go back into your firmware and disable the BIOS/CSM/legacy option that you enabled. Such a configuration creates the opportunity for problems related to the boot mode. If you intend to single-boot Ubuntu, then the boot mode isn't so important. If you can't get the Ubuntu installer to ...


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1- Run ctrl + alt + f2 2- Login with root or an admin. 3- sudo apt-get install lightdm 4- sudo apt-get update 5- sudo service lightdm start 6- sudo reboot


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First of all you need to boot from Ubuntu LiveCD to be able to move Ubuntu partitions. You see that now they are locked with "key" sign. After that you will be able to move all partitions. But do not mount them in Nautilus, otherwise they will be locked again. But you can unmount partitions using right-click in Gparted. But you may have trouble with ...


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Have you tried using the dd command? It's a low level disk command, which means it can be very dangerous if you type incorrectly, so proceed with caution! You will need an Ubuntu live CD or USB to boot from, or an Ubuntu installation on another disk, and you need to know the device name for your SSD, eg /dev/sda. It's really important that you get the ...


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You can use Clonezilla. It's a great tool if you want all systems have a same copy of OS and softwares. As your requirement look like you want all alike systems. You can clone any hard disk partition or full hard disk using this utility. You will have a great choice of USB install, network install, samba server, etc. to install your cloned image to other ...


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You have many tools that are available for Ubuntu 12.04(some of them are not used anymore for newer versions. but still works for ubuntu 12.04). relinux remastersys Ubuntu Builder System Imager And much more. I personally advise you to use Relinux. Download this version from launchpad and not the last version to use the following tutorial on it Here ...


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I don't understand why you used EasyBCD, as it's really not necessary in this case. It appears to be that you have been booted to a Grub shell. Take a look at this for how you should boot to your Linux HDD. Once you do that, run (in a terminal): sudo update-grub and it should automatically add entries to your Grub configuration.


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In principle (without actually seeing your partition layout) you should be able to simply extend the Ubuntu partition using the unallocated space. This process ought to be perfectly safe. However, in real life, nothing is guaranteed. Why not use disk imaging software (e.g. Macrium Reflect Free Edition for Windows, Clonezilla for Linux) to make a backup of ...


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There appears to be other people having this issue as well. A bug report was also made on this. It appears to be a bug with version 3.16. A temporary fix would be to use LightDM instead, so (in a VT, eg Ctrl+Alt+F1: sudo apt-get install lightdm sudo dpkg-reconfigure lightdm Press enter to get past the "Configuring lightdm" screen, and then navigate to ...


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If you have issues with video adapter after fresh install, you need to boot with "nomodeset" boot parameter and after that install a proper video driver. In some cases video adapters are not well supported by kernel drivers. How to boot with "nomodeset" you can see HERE.


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The best solution is to deactivate (uncomment) the classic swap line in fstab(not the mapper). if you then reboot and type sudo swapon --summary you should get a swap partition on /dev/dm-X (usually 0). If yes, be happy cryptswap is working well.


-1

This doesn't seem like an issue with reformatting the PC. You're saying the PC booted up after re-installing Windows, so you managed to properly install the OS. If it doesn't boot after installing drivers it could either be because a driver is corrupt or you didn't let the PC shutdown properly to complete the installation.(Or many other various reasons) ...


1

Answered by Terrance in comments of original poster. When installing Ubuntu along side of Windows or vice versa a bootloader, mainly Grub is installed. If after running updates you can no longer see your other operating systems try the following: You will want to run the following command: sudo update-grub This command will basically update the grub ...


0

You can remove all partitions if you like. But you will lose the recpvery feature that allows to restore everything to factory defaults. /dev/sda1 is EFI boot. It is needed for UEFI. /dev/sda3 must be Ubuntu OEM distribution image. I do not know what /dev/sda2 is for, but it may be also needed for factory restore. Regarding swap partition that you call ...


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ESP-System, DIAGS is for OEM(reserved) (dell of course), and OS is your primary partition. http://en.community.dell.com/support-forums/software-os/f/4677/t/19494111 Check out this forum of official google... Will be helpful for sure...


-1

I skipped the whole gdisk thing as mentioned in the solution. This alone worked for me ./install.sh -–usedefault /dev/<EFI-disk-of-external-storage-where-ubuntu-is-installed>


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I did the update yesterday on 14.04, and 15.04, and it went OK. What I think it does, it removes an older version, and installs a newer one. Both systems have been rebooted, and they both work fine.


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Note: I am not a Linux expert and I would appreciate if someone more knowledgeable could weigh in and confirm this is a safe temporary solution. Also, here is the source -- all credit goes to the guys that figured this out. You could try this There is one more thing that seems to work. Apparently you can manually edit your GRUB file like ...


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I would load Bios A03 or A04. Then I would install Ubuntu 15.04. This is the setup I have. I currently have the bios set to UEFI and Secure Boot. Those options work. I have no audio issues, but did have to use special firmware to get bluetooth working. Instructions Here.


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Imho it's a feature, I always use it since it's faster (I don't have to move my fingers from the arrow keys to return). Though it's strange that it isn't mentioned in the manual, they only write about return...


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No there are no additional module supposed to be added to initramfs. Try another keyboard and probably another connection type or an adapter that emulates a plain keyboard even if you connect a special keyboard with additional functionality or multiple devices (like a pointing device). I have had several keyboards and adapters (Bluetooth, PS/2, USB, KVM ...


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Just add them at the end of the file like that # List of modules that you want to include in your initramfs. # They will be loaded at boot time in the order below. # # Syntax: module_name [args ...] # # You must run update-initramfs(8) to effect this change. # # Examples: # # raid1 # sd_mod usbcore uhci_hcd ehci_hcd usbhid But I not think it is related ...


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I have reinstalled the Ubuntu and issue has been resolved. Seems like there was some issue for first time installation.


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If you don't mind to reinstall, I propose to reinstall instead of dealing with Gparted and all those partitions. Boot into Ubuntu Installation media. This can be either CD or USB stick. Start the installation. Proceed to Step 4 and choose "Something else": You will see your disk as /dev/sda Click "New Partition Table..." You will see that you have free ...



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