New answers tagged

1

1 method to do this would be to boot from a live dvd, go to command line and do a sudo -i fsck /dev/sdb1 According to geekstuff you should be able to do it from initramfs directly. If ... # fsck -a /dev/sdb1 # echo $? shows an error code 4 you can also do ... # fsck -y /dev/sdb1 If it works an exit will restart the boot process.


1

Your Dell Optiplex does not have compatible hardware for installing Ubuntu 14.04, so you are getting strange looking screens when the computer is booting. Your computer's hardware is so old that you would be better off installing the most lightweight Ubuntu edition that you can get, which is Lubuntu 14.04. Lubuntu 14.04 is the Ubuntu edition that is most ...


0

Try Universal USB Installer. It is specifically used to make bootable USB drives for all Linux distributions. There is a drop down list containing all the Linux distros and several relevant programs. Just choose the one you need and provide the ISO and voila! http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/


0

My pain killer is: mkusb Tested on Ubuntu 15.04 to burn 14.04.


0

If you use rEFInd to have a dual boot (Mac OS X, Ubuntu), you can choose to restart Ubuntu, rather than shut down it. Then, in the rEFInd screen (where you choose which OS to launch), you can choose to simply shut down the computer. It's a workaround, but it works for me...


0

You will be better off in the future if primary OS is backed up prior to the installation of another. First, preferably, we have to discover a path that let us boot you into Windows. Assuming that Lubuntu filesystem has not overwritten any bit of Windows (highly probable) and GRUB is installed with Lubuntu on default you can let os-prober do the job. To ...


0

Change the bootable USB drive's default boot options. Enable the following options by pressing F6 (to access Other Options) at the purple screen at the beginning of the Ubuntu installer. acpi=off noapic nolapic edd=on nodmraid nomodeset


1

You can go ahead and start installing Ubuntu 13.04 rather than downgrading as mentioned in this thread. It will be less efforts to install 13.04 and more cleaner approach. Moreover you already have the disk partitions on which you need to install Ubuntu. I would check with the release notes of that software(OpenFOAM) -in general the software/tools that i am ...


0

The solution was to simply give the install-from-USB-key more time--a lot of time. When I left for Mardi Gras the funky display was present. When I returned several hours later, the laptop was running from the USB key with an Ubuntu desktop displayed, including a link icon titled "Install Ubuntu". Thanks for the help!


0

The message from Boot-repair-disk that helped me, especially the last sentence: If your computer reboots directly into Windows, try to change the boot order in your BIOS. If your BIOS does not allow to change the boot order, change the default boot entry of the Windows bootloader. For example you can boot into Windows, then type the following command in an ...


1

Kernel panics in Ubuntu's official kernels should almost always be reported to the kernel bug tracker on Launchpad, where they may be escalated to upstream bug trackers if necessary – unless of course you find a similar existing report. I believe this holds true in your case.


0

Check whether you have some conflicting xserver-xorg-video-intel-lts-* packages installed. dpkg -l xserver-xorg-video-inte* | grep '^ii' I would apt- get purge all installed xserver-xorg-video-intel packages, and then try sudo apt-get install --reinstall ubuntu-desktop That should reinstall the newest version of the missing (purged) ...


0

With USB, try Unetbootin. sudo apt-get install unetbootin With DVD, follow this. Check again you iso (may corrupted, etc).


0

Do Ctrl+Alt+F7 to get into XWindows Terminal. This does happened to me for an old desktop. I installed Ubuntu once again and it got fixed as I tried various stuff but nothing worked out.


0

When I look at the specs of that touchcomputer, you probably don't have enough RAM to run a recent version of ubuntu. I would go with lubuntu. You will find the lubuntu install iso here.


0

I modified the script that causes the popup and it works great. Enter into the terminal. type: sudo gedit /etc/X11/Xsession.d/98vboxadd-xclient now your editor will open up with the script. look for the following script lines. if test -f /proc/modules && ! grep -q vboxguest /proc/modules 2>/dev/null; then # Do not start if the kernel module ...


1

Open a terminal sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair For more information, refer this link


3

Reinstall Ubuntu GRUB boot loader. Boot from the Ubuntu installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing. On desktop open a terminal and execute : sudo mount /dev/sda2 /mnt sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot/efi for i in /dev /dev/pts /proc /sys /run; do sudo mount -B $i /mnt$i; done sudo chroot /mnt grub-install /dev/sda update-grub Note : sda ...


0

Already fixed. Fixed by restoring grub boot menu and update-grub. Now the login screen works


2

First of all : You have to install Ubuntu in the same mode as Windows is installed. When you have installed Windows in EFI mode, then do this with Ubuntu as well. Second : When there is no boot menu to be seen, disable GRUB hidden timeout. Open a terminal and execute: sudo apt-get install gksu gksudo gedit /etc/default/grub Place a # in ...


2

Your /etc/profile is a mess. Even after the removal of the stray iamgreat at the beginning, sh -n still complained about a syntax error. After re-indentation and sanitization of white-space, the error was gone. Here's the result: # /etc/profile: system-wide .profile file for the Bourne shell (sh(1)) # and Bourne compatible shells (bash(1), ksh(1), ash(1), ...


2

iamgreat# /etc/profile: system-wide .profile file for the Bourne shell (sh(1)) You shouldn't have that iamgreat there. Remove it. You can use this command to do so: sudo sed -i '1s/^iamgreat//' /etc/profile Or use an editor.


0

If you look at your pastebin contents there are 3 red flags: What is sdb1? __________________________________________________________________________ It is vfat and contains the following Boot files: /boot/grub/grub.cfg /syslinux.cfg /EFI/BOOT/grubx64.efi /ldlinux.sys =================== UEFI/Legacy mode: This live-session ...


0

Grab a copy of the Ubuntu bootable iso, then burn it on to a disc. Check and see if the UEFI is on by restarting your computer and heading to the bios settings. Depending on your computer entering the bios settings can vary on the function keys (mine is F10). You have 2 options on installing: Install Ubuntu in UEFI mode to run alongside Windows in UEFI. ...


0

OK, for now I have something that works, if someone comes up with a better solution (and explains why it is a better solution) I will accept that answer. So I use eog (Eye of gnome), and to launch it use this command: eog -f -w -g ~/Pictures/loader.png 1>/dev/null 2>&1& So this loads the the image loader.png from the Pictures directory in ...


2

I am not knowledgeable enough to answer weather GRUB is required or not, but if your goal is to hide GRUB completely , I have a better solution than the accepted answer. In order to achieve the fastest possible boot, instead of having GRUB wait for a timeout, it is possible for GRUB to not print the menu, unless the Shift key is held down during GRUB's ...


0

How many windows partitions do you have? Many OEM (retail bought) machines will limit the number of partitions a drive can have. The only time I've experienced this it's been limited to 4 partitions, but your mileage may vary.


0

If you have a USB flash drive laying around, you could always use it to install Ubuntu that way. Please note that this will start a fresh installation, which may overwrite your files, depending on how your partitions are set up. Download the ISO for your architecture (32-bit or 64-bit). Fire up the terminal on your Ubuntu computer, insert your flash drive, ...


1

You can only upgrade from LTS to LTS, or to the next 6-monthly release. While you may attempt to do something else, it is NOT supported. To upgrade from 14.04 LTS, then either wait for 16.04 LTS (April 2016) or try a new install of 15.10 on a separate partition/drive (or spare platform). Do not attempt to upgrade from 14.04 LTS directly to 15.10.


0

I had one of these too. I would go with lubuntu on these machines. Problem is, that the Pentium M CPU in the nc8000 doesn't have the PAE feature, required with newer versions of Ubuntu. I would wait for 16.04 and do a system upgrade. This is the best (only) way to go. A new installation will be more complicated because of the (mentioned) missing PAE feature ...


0

List the successfully installed kernels (excluding booted kernel) by command: dpkg-query -W -f='${Status} ${Package}\n' | awk '/^install ok installed linux-image-[0-9]+/{print $4}' | grep -Fv $(uname -r) Purge the oldest one (here linux-image-4.2.0-23-generic) by sudo dpkg --purge linux-image-4.2.0-23-generic to free some space in /boot. If the ...


0

Try this sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair For more details, refer this link Please make sure that both Windows and Ubuntu are installed in EFI mode. Also disable secure boot in BIOS.


0

Since you can still use your mouse why not try reinstalling/installing input device drivers? sudo apt-get install --reinstall xserver-xorg-input-all or sudo apt-get install xserver-xorg-input-all


0

I realize that this is old but I landed as the result of a search. Perhaps this will help someone else: My solution to this problem (though I'm sure my repair logs may be different) was to burn my .iso to CD or USB with software that was not from Pendrive. I gave LiLi USB installer a shot and it worked. The moral of this story is that if you're stuck ...


0

OK this is silly but I found the solution the error had to do with an /etc/fstab entry for an USB drive: /dev/disk/by-label/SeqData1 /mnt/SeqData1 nosuid,nodev,nobootwait,nofail,noauto,x-gvfs-show 0 0 I had to comment this one out and systemd booted fine. Why this entry for a USB drive was there in the first place I'm not sure. I tried first using nofail ...


0

This seems to be a bug. Maybe you can boot from the Livecd, and try to reinstall GRUB. Use live cd and choose to install Ubuntu. Don't Format partitions already created. Chose mount point for each partition, and then select continue. The grub installer will be reinstalled correctly. Or Try to Commit: _GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_ and ...


-2

Here's my default ~/.profile file. If you can boot from your installation medium you can copy it to your home folder: Link: # ~/.profile: executed by the command interpreter for login shells. # This file is not read by bash(1), if ~/.bash_profile or ~/.bash_login # exists. # see /usr/share/doc/bash/examples/startup-files for examples. # the files ...


-1

It is very much possible(and normal) to have GRUB(and various options for GRUB) even if you are using only Ubuntu. Those options gives you some flexibility to try out various options in the only O/S(Ubuntu) that you have.


0

Run fdisk -l on terminal to check the windows partition. If you found it, then type update-grub Then reboot And you will able be able to choose your selected OS


1

Fixed! After a lot trials I managed it to work. I reinstalled xserver and nouveau. Though I had also updated Unity to 8 before thinking that it might have corrupted. :P So if anyone is having same issues can do this ;)


0

Too late to answer, just to write a solution to this problem: This link contains mostly the actions to be performed to install ubuntu in pipo x8. https://plus.google.com/+IanMORRISON/posts/UNWdwRMqy3j A brief description on what we did to install ubuntu 14.04 in X8: The UEFI is 32 bits so yo should install 32 bits OS versions Download ubuntu 32 bits, ...


0

The same thing happened to me, and I was also puzzled why one flash drive worked and the other one, a SanDisk Cruzer Blade USB flash drive, didn't. I solved the problem by reformatting the SanDisk USB flash drive with the FAT32 filesystem format that it had when it was new. I used GParted from the Ubuntu Software Center to reformat the flash drive.


0

I run Ubuntu 14.04 with a number of Virtualbox VMs. None of the answers in this forum worked. But this solution which I found on a Linuxlite worked: https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/other/vboxclient-the-virtualbox-kernel-service-is-not-running/msg19295/#msg19295 You need to edit: /etc/X11/Xsession.d/98vboxadd-xclient (with any text editor) Find the line: ...


8

All the other answers start good, advising you that GRUB is usually there whether you see it or not, you probably shouldn't start taking random potshots at it, and how to restore your system to the 'hidden GRUB' you (presumably) previously enjoyed. However, they end up going wrong - in making blanket statements that GRUB is always required, when this is ...


26

You cannot uninstall GRUB. As your installation stands, GRUB is necessary to boot Ubuntu (that's why it's called the bootloader). Every OS has a bootloader, and every OS needs that bootloader to boot (lots of booting :P). EDIT: As people in the comments have pointed out, there are alternatives to using GRUB. However, there is no reason to switch to one, ...


0

Do not try to remove grub, it is used as the bootloader for Ubuntu, just like the Windows mbr, which you just do not see. You could try to install the program grub-customizer, which lets you define different settings for grub in a simple GUI. You could set the timeout to 0 and tell it to always boot the first entry, so you will directly boot Ubuntu without ...


-1

Try this, a little tedious but worked for me: If the system boots without showing you GRUB, when it stalls press "ALT+F1" (or fn-ALT-F1) to enter console mode. Enter your credentials and when the prompt appear enter : sudo nano /etc/default/grub Then find the line "GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT=“quiet splash" and enter after "splash": ...


0

How to create a Windows boot medium is a topic best addressed on a Windows forum, not here. That said, I'd use FAT, not NTFS, and I'd try using Unetbootin for the job, or copy files manually from the UDF side of the .iso image file. (Most Linux tools will mount the ISO-9660 side, which in the case of a Windows disc, contains a text file with a message to the ...


1

A MCE (Machine Check Error) is a type of computer hardware error that occurs when a computer's central processing unit detects a hardware problem. This usually indicates you might have a hardware issue. Usually when I've encountered an MCE I have a bad stick of memory but I can't be certain this is your problem. Please run a memory test.


0

I have laptop with UEFI technology, and for installing dual boot is pain. Try to identify your laptop first, and if it have UEFI, you can learn a little about UEFI here.



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