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0

Check your cables. That worked for me .tx


-1

You could try disabling secure boot in the BIOS config.


1

On my ASUS UEFI PC it would not recognize a bootable USB unless I: Powered off the PC Inserted the USB Powered on the PC Entered the BIOS Set the USB as boot priority 1 Allowed the boot to continue I had to set the boot order while the USB was inserted, in the same restart session. Doing it in advance did not work. PS your English is fine.


1

I am not entirely sure but try this: Try and go into BIOS when the PC starts (press either del/enter) and see if you can disable UEFI. If you can, reboot and see if you can automatically boot. Also if you have a button that says you can pick another media to boot into, press that and your USB should be there. Hope it helps!


0

Your problem is caused by Btrfs quirks. Because it supports subvolumes, it's often necessary to specify unusual options to get rEFInd to scan the right subdirectory and to get the kernel to recognize the right location as its root. To get rEFInd to scan the kernels, you must add the following line to refind.conf: also_scan_dirs +,@/boot This assumes that ...


0

Installing Ubuntu is pretty easy if you know what you are doing.First use a USB.After that turn off Secure Boot as that makes the ISO unbootable.Then burn the Ubuntu ISO to the USB using a program like Rufus(Don't use UNETBOOTIN it's broken).Then restart your computer and access the BIOS.In there select your USB device.After that you should see the Ubuntu ...


1

As the D630 is an older model I don't believe UEFI has anything to do with it. Double check system requirements here I would avoid unetbootin as in my experience success is rare. I've had excellent results using dd to duplicate the iso to a USB flash drive. The process to do so can be found in here. Basically you just connect the flash drive you wish to ...


0

Basically there are two stages to this. decrypting mounting the Logical volumes Assuming your drive is on sda5 (which is the Ubuntu default AFAIK but might be different) sudo cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda5 luks You are then promted for your password. Than do the LVM stuff sudo pvscan && sudo vgscan && sudo vgchange -a y Use lsblk ...


0

I just had to run this in windows: bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\ubuntu\grubx64.efi Grub appears fine on boot and I can boot into Ubuntu and Win10 fine.


0

Figured it out. Booted the computer from an Ubuntu live usb. Installed and ran Boot-Repair.


1

How to create a bootable USB stick on OS X These are the instructions for how to create a bootable USB stick on OS X from the official ubuntu.com website. This procedure requires that you create an .img file from the .iso file you download. It will also change the filesystem that is on the USB stick to make it bootable, so backup all data before ...


0

If you can rebuild U-Boot, you can specify the boot arguments you want in the U-Boot source code via the CONFIG_EXTRA_ENV_SETTINGS definition. Find where CONFIG_EXTRA_ENV_SETTINGS is defined for your build (e.g. include/configs/yourboard.h) and modify the bootargs line as needed. I think your board's header file might be mx6qarm2.h (based on my checkout of ...


0

Your missing partition is here or between start of extended partition at 1547... & first partition shown at 1915...: /dev/sda4 1547945982 1953521663 202787841 f W95 Ext'd (LBA) /dev/sda5 1915731968 1953521663 18894848 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT You can use testdisk, but it uses CHS. You have to choose all existing partitions and the ...


0

This is occurring as in BIOS network boot option is enabled and in boot priorities network boot is 1st or before to the option USB or primary HDD. You simply need to disable network boot option in BIOS setup of your Dell INSPIRON 3421.


-1

Ubuntu installer either runs in UEFI mode or in BIOS mode. If you want both of your hard disks to be detected, partition tables of both should be same. Then boot either in UEFI mode or in BIOS mode (according to your partition table).


0

My computer came with Windows 8 pre-installed so I shrunk the Windows partition to make room for Ubuntu. That it how it works for the last year. After the second reboot in Windows 10 upgrade the computer did not boot any more. The grub only displayed a grub rescue command prompt. I found out later that the problem occurred because windows somehow changed the ...


0

You can not create more that 4 primary partitions in MBR. I suggest temporarily removing /sda3 swap partition. Move left side of /sda4 right. Remove /sda3. Create an extended partition in unallocated space. Create two partitions inside the extended. Format one as swap, the other as ext2 for /boot. Update /etc/fstab with new UUIDs and mount points for swap ...


0

You can restore the Windows bootloader with a Windows 8/8.1 DVD. These instructions are inspired by Manindra Mehra's answer, but I expanded it with full working details (verified with a Windows 8.1 DVD). Put the DVD in your optical drive and boot from it. Press a key when it displays Press any key to start from CD or DVD. Select your language etc. and ...


0

The USB/CD from which the installation is made is still in the computer so it boots from there. Remove it.


0

To use boot-repair you need to set in BIOS: Enable UEFI (in my BIOS it is:) Legacy support DISABLE Disable Secure Boot Probably you have Secure Boot enabled, so you get "incorrectly signed file" error.


3

There are some peculiarities about your installation: Your computer has two Windows Recovery Environment partitions, /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda5. My guess is one is from your previous Windows installation and the other is for the new installation, but I can't be positive of that. I doubt if this duplication is causing you any problems per se; I mention it ...


0

I use a usb stick to test Ubuntu Core on a Notebook (Lenovo i5). To make the USB stick: $ unxz ubuntu-15.04-snappy-amd64-generic.img.xz $ sudo dd if=ubuntu-15.04-snappy-amd64-generic.img of=/dev/sdb bs=4M (change /dev/sdb with the right device)


0

You can start from a USB device pressing the "c" key at boot time. Startup key combinations for Mac


2

From the output of your boot-repair command, it looks like you have an UEFI system… However, Ubuntu is installed in non-UEFI mode, and Windows is installed in UEFI mode so only one of the two is going to work at a time without changing the boot parameters… The best you can do is: re-install Windows 10 in non-UEFI mode or reinstall Ubuntu in UEFI mode ...


1

You need to change your boot priority so grub takes president over the Windows bootloader. In your UEFI go to Boot and look for something similar to Boot Option Priorities and set Boot Option #1 to ubuntu (P#: drive name). This should set grub as your default boot device. It is also worth noting that devices such as ubuntu (size) and Windows Boot Manager (P# ...


0

You could try this: alther the grub and enter this in the terminal: sudo -I gedit /boot/grub.cfg and then type this in where its run the windows: fi uuid=ntfs set root=c:/ echo 'starting mokmanager' nfts mokmanager.efi ehco 'starting windows' ntfs c:/windows/win.exe and it might work fine this way.


2

Installing windows (or upgrading it) alongside linux can be problematic. Try this: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair I used it to fix a problem after I installed the Windows 10 tech preview, and it worked. Basically, what it does is reinstall grub to work with all currently installed operating systems. Make sure to tell it to install grub to ...


1

Boot-Repair allows to easily do the EFI renaming via the "Rename Windows EFI files" option, but that option is not enabled by default because it's a dirty hack and it is not reliable in all situations. Instead, it is safer to change the UEFI boot order, when possible, or have bcd call grub, which is what Boot-Repair suggests (see the 4 last lines of your ...


0

If you have installed the server version then this is expected. Although if you have not installed the server version then also this can happen. Your OS is unable to continue up to the six init levels required for normal startup. It is seemingly stuck at the first init run level which happens when something is broken.I suggest that instead of trying to ...


1

Nothing will show up as you type your password, this is an intentional security feature! Make sure you type the password correctly, remember that Ubuntu is case-sensitive!


0

I never found a solution to this, I have ATI/AMD dual graphics, and have the same issues, xserver breaks after installing proprietary drivers from repositories, as well as from the ATI/AMD website.I even attempted updating to kernel 4.1, but to no avail. My only solution has been to downgrade to Ubuntu 14.04.


0

Can't believe: exactly the old dirty hack with manual renaming of EFI-files works. I wonder why Boot Repair didn't manage this.


1

you could try this: boot from a ubuntu installation live usb and then run boot-repair again and use this custom repair and it might work fine this way.


0

I use (http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/) - been using it for years to burn iso's to usb. Using ISO Master you can extract it and modify what you want then turn it back to iso.


0

I read something about drives not being detected. They said you need to switch your sata cable on your motherboard to a different spot. I know that you don't have a sata cable.So maybe try to move your hard drive in a different spot. Like if you plugged the hard drive in the front move it to the back. Switch it around.Try to have the hardrive in the back ...


2

It is possible that bits of code may get dragged around from kernel to kernel - during the unpacking/install - It is also possible to go back to an older kernel. At the grub boot menu choose the Kernel you want to boot to - Once you have chosen the Kernel you want to keep and you have booted into it uname -r will tell you what kernel you are currently ...


0

If you have a standard spinning harddrive, E4rat can improve the loading of your system. Link to how to install it- http://www.howtogeek.com/69753/how-to-cut-your-linux-pcs-boot-time-in-half-with-e4rat/?PageSpeed=noscript Also, if you are not using btrfs, this can delay your bootup by several seconds. You can safely uninstall btrfs-tools. sudo apt-get ...


0

If you don't want Ubuntu anymore, go ahead and delete it. No harm done. However if you do, obviously deleting it will be bad. So It's all preference. But to answer the question directly, no, no harm to Windows or the computer.


0

Try this: Boot the computer from Ubuntu. Open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-pc grub-pc-bin grub-common grub2-common sudo grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg sudo grub-install --recheck /dev/sda sudo gparted Delete the partition using GParted, close it and continue running: sudo update-grub sudo ...


0

I dont really have a lot of knowledge with NUC. But maybe this will work. Take the usb hard drive and unplug it. Leave the usb stick in. Turn on the NAC and then wait like 1 second then plug back in the hard drive. It sounds crazy but it might work. If you can plug it in the second it boots it could work. If your NAC displays something like the Intel logo ...


0

I finally made it: THe problem was that dmraid (the former mdadm) wos installed which is legacy, I uninstalled that via apt-get. Then created the raid with mdadm -C /dev/md/imsm /dev/sda /dev/sdb /dev/sdc /dev/sdj -n 4 -e imsm mdadm -C /dev/md/vol0 /dev/md/imsm –n 3 –l 10 And now the output looks like this (AWESOME :)


1

Try running it in protected mode and repair with: apt-get update --fix-missing


0

Happens to me frequently...start in protected mode -if you can, using boot options (with network enabled) then open synaptic package manager. Look in "History" if you can't remember what package(s) were installed; then mark them for "uninstall" and hit "apply". After..it seems to help if u use the "fix broken packages" in synaptic also. Reload repositories ...


-2

Go into your motherboard settings and configure your USBs It is a simple as that. If that doesn't work, You have a loose cable, and you will have to solder it.


1

Run sudo fdisk -l to find swap partition (i.e. /dev/sda6) Grab UUID in /etc/crypttab or sudo blkid for /dev/sda6 (replace device with your swap) Run sudo mkswap -U UUID /dev/sda6 (replace UUID and device with your swap) Append ,offset=1024 to the end of cryptswap1 line in /etc/crypttab Add "/dev/mapper/cryptswap1 none swap sw 0 0" to /etc/fstab Run sudo ...


0

You can delete the partition using GParted and run sudo update-grub. But first of all create an Ubuntu distro bootable drive and back up your data - anything can happen. If sudo update-grub does not work when you run it from the installed Ubuntu then boot from the bootable drive you created and run the command. That works when the latter fails.


1

Kernel 3.13.0-59 seems to be buggy. There a number of reports, that installation of this kernel causes various problems. Probably some backport was not very good. I suggest switching to kernel 3.19 by running sudo apt-get install linux-generic-lts-vivid


1

Booting Windows 7 in EFI mode on a Mac is tricky at best. (Note UEFI is EFI 2.x, but Macs' EFIs are all 1.x versions, so Macs technically don't have UEFIs.) There's a very long thread on MacRumors about this subject: http://forums.macrumors.com/threads/win7-x64-booting-natively-via-efi-no-bios-emulation.696523/ To boil this thread down, some people have ...


0

I recommend you to use this tool to create a bootable USB. Make sure to select GPT partition scheme for UEFI comuters on second field.


0

As Zilvador says, this could be a Secure Boot issue; however, Ubuntu should support Secure Boot, so I suspect that one of two other things is happening: Improperly-created USB drive -- Assuming no changes to a stock computer, you'll need a USB drive with an EFI boot loader installed on it (including Ubuntu's Secure Boot tool, which is called Shim). Some ...



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