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1

I have had this, but only in 16.04 (not 14.04). I fixed it by booting with systemd by going into Advanced Options for Ubuntu in the GRUB menu and selecting my-kernel-version (systemd). Then once I booted I made systemd the default boot: sudo apt-get install systemd-sysv


0

Ok this fixed everything : Grub rescue problem after deleting Ubuntu partition! I did burn the ubuntu iso into an usb and did everything on it.


0

we should fix this problem by editing boot menu; and I suggest "EasyBCD" for it. first of all (open Easybcd). click on add new entry and then go to "NeoGrub" and click on Install now go to linux/BSD tab. change type to : grub2 (you can change the name as well) and select automatically locate and load from the "Drive" tab, and add this entry. right now ...


0

Change the timeout value in the refind.conf configuration file. With a value of -1 rEFInd boots directly, with a value of 0, it waits indefinitely. A positive value set the waiting time in seconds. From the rEFInd documentation: Thus, the rEFInd configuration file might be /boot/efi/EFI/refind/refind.conf, /boot/EFI/BOOT/refind.conf, /Volumes/ESP/EFI/...


0

I have solved the problem. For those who have a ASROCK motherboard with one or more AMD 390 connected and the system will not boot try to set the primary graphic adapter to ONBOARD in bios. After that my system boot headless without any problems and recognize the AMD 390.


0

The answer by Sneetsher is valid, but, just as an alternative, I used a different solution. If you want to have separate entries in GRUB in /etc/grub.d/ for generic and lowlatency kernels, you can just make a copy of the file 09_lowlatency. If you want the new entry to be the first one, name it something like 08_generic, but you can choose the ordering as ...


0

The same problem was solved by changing SATA port.


1

In case of problems with logging in: it could be that purging deleted a needed file in /home/$USER/ or it changed permissions on a needed file. If the problems occur before login it is more than likely related to the video card driver. 1st thing to do is to go to a TTY (control alt f1). You can use apt-get to re-install ubuntu with: sudo apt-get install ...


0

There will be a gear or icon either near the password field or in the status bar on the login screen. If it's an icon, it will have the Ubuntu logo in it (if Unity is your default DE). Click it to choose another DE before logging in.


0

News: I was able to run from the live-pendrive and install by using the nomodeset param. I learned how here: Trying to install Ubuntu 14.04, monitor says mode unsupported/out of range Bsically, pressing the "e" key in the grub menu and adding that string after the words "quiet splash".


0

I've found the answer. If it could come in handy to someone - the thing was to create EFI partition on the drive where the Windows was installed. It looks like after installing dual boot Ubuntu it moved that partition to the partition where GRUB and Ubuntu were installed and I had to bring it back home. It can pretty easily be done with diskpart utility, ...


1

Install a program called 'syslinux' by sudo apt-get install syslinux. Then create/obtain an ISO9660 file (e.g. filename.iso). In a terminal window type: isohybrid filename.iso. Now the iso file is hybrid, you can use it as CD and USB image file. The hybridization process will change the checksum of the file. Make sure to check it against the new checksum. ...


1

First check if Windows is still there (not erased by mistake). Boot into a Live Ubuntu and open GParted. Check partition map and look for ntfs partitions labeled msftdata, Windows, etc. If Windows is still there, insert the Win install disk and reboot into it (remove the Live Ubuntu medium while restarting the PC). Let the Wins install process begin and ...


0

What seems to have happened is that GRUB (Ubuntu's default bootloader) has nuked the default Windows bootloader. I haven't used Windows in quite some time, but the solution is most likely to repair the bootloader using your installation CD. There is some information on this blog post here - http://blog.d0zingcat.xyz/2015/09/28/Windows/How%20to%20repair%...


0

Try this. Turn the power on and press F2. You may have to hold it down. When you get to the BIOS screen you'll be looking for boot devices. If your USB is plugged in, it should be on the list. Select the USB, save changes and reboot. If your USB is an ISO image and the BIOS fix worked then it will boot to ubuntu installation.


0

I’m not 100% certain about this but have you checked the BIOS to see if it will even try to boot from the existing SSD? I had a similar problem and had to change the boot order in the BIOS to convince the machine to start there and not even try the other boot options.


1

Resolved by deleting the config folder and then rebooting.


2

I didn't properly burn iso to dvd. SOLVED


0

30 secs sounds good if you don't have SSD (mine is 48sec) . Try disabling some applications from the Startup Applications program. Also take a look at these services: Disable bluetooth.service if you don't use bluetooth by executing systemctl disable bluetooth and you will gain about 1 sec. The cmdavd.service and cmdmgd.service must be from the comodo ...


0

Reinstall ubuntu-desktop again. Enter some tty (with ctrl+alt+F1) after boot or go to Advanced Options for Ubuntu->Recovery mode->root from the grub menu at boot (press and hold alt or space or esc or shift during boot if you don't see the grub menu) and run these commands: sudo apt-get autoremove --purge ubuntu-desktop sudo apt-get install -f #in order to ...


0

Try installing Ubnuntu 16.04. If you encounter same problem then on boot menu select try without install and press e and add nouveau.modeset=0 after quiet splash --- this works for me. Then after loading Ubuntu install it.


0

Easiest way is dd from terminal sudo dd if=location of Windows image of=/dev/sd# Replace # with your usb drive letter, do not enter the partition number, then press enter. MAKE SURE to unmount the usb prior to running dd. When it runs it will look like nothings happening, when it completes it will output how much data was written. Reboot and boot from the ...


2

When you install MS Windows 10, it overwrites the Grub contents in MBR to its own. All your Windows and Linux OS files are intact and good. All you need to do here is to repair you GRUB files. I used boot-repair and it worked very well for me. If you want to fresh install everything, Install Windows 10 first and then install Ubuntu. It is possible from ...


0

You may want to try following the readme at: https://github.com/erichs/bootnukem git clone https://github.com/erichs/bootnukem.git cd bootnukem sudo ./install.sh Then ./bootnukem --dry-run


0

You can use Unetbootin and press F12 when the brand of your laptop appears on the screen when it boots. choose the usb storage device option.


0

There is definitely a problem with the driver of the GTX 1070 on Ubuntu16.04. I install my GTX 1070 recently and it works perfect on win10. Then I setup a new Ubuntu16.04 as a second OS. At first, nothing went wrong during the setup process. But when the setup process finished, my desktop reboot into Ubuntu, the only thing I could see is the wallpaper ...


1

This is almost certainly an unneeded file as the naming convention for the map files in /boot is as follows: andrew@athens:~$ ls /boot | grep -E *map* System.map-4.4.0-15-generic System.map-4.4.0-22-generic Test this on your own system, this is on Xenial Xerus 16.04. The file can be safely left in place but if you are at all worried simply back the file ...


0

Resolved The install script for that program had added a mount for cgroup to the fstab that prevented systemd from being able to mount it later. Removed mount statement and I am back up and going :)


0

open the tty conf in the /etc/init/ directory comment out those lines in the ttyX.conf files: respawn exec /sbin/getty -8 38400 ttyX Example to disable tty1: sudo -H gedit /etc/init/tty1.conf Then edit by inserting # in front of the commands #respawn #exec /sbin/getty -8 38400 tty1 Save and Reboot


1

Regarding Android x86 6.0 The "EEEPC" assignment is only for ASUS EEEPCs, only use it if you have one, otherwise use android_x86, do not use generic_x86, you will get stuck at the boot animation and have to restart by using CTRL+F1 to access the terminal and issue reboot as the GUI will not get loaded. I know this because I spent several hours following bad, ...


-1

If I had to guess, I'd say that you have a memory problem. I'm also guessing that you have a UEFI machine, and it doesn't show the memory test on the GRUB screen shown at boot time. Since you have 16G RAM, I suspect that you have 4 sticks of 4G RAM in your memory slots, and are configured as interleaved memory. First I'd try to reseat the existing memory ...


1

Bring your system up-to-date, reinstall the unity-settings-daemon and reboot your system: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get --reinstall install unity-settings-daemon sudo reboot This could already solve the issue...


0

1.Boot the system with the ubuntu LiveCD. 2.open the Terminal and type sudo fdisk -l it will list number of partition look which Device contain partition of the type 'Linux' 3.Copy the Device name containing the partition For example after typing sudo fdisk -l It may list some device list like /dev/sda1/, /dev/sda2/,...


0

On ubuntu 16.04 ( I struggled with ubuntu while didn't want to install xubuntu) just set nouveau.modeset=0. Courtesy to this answer. set this parameter before quiet splash --- like nouveau.modeset=0 quiet splash ---


0

You can't "merge" partitions in Gparted. You can create, delete, or resize them. There was no need to format swap partition to ext4. You need to unmount your sda6 partition, delete sda5 and sda7, then expand the sda6. Consider leaving space for a swap partition and do not forget to add the new UUID of it to /etc/fstab. Note: After you move the start of ...


0

When trying to resize internal disk linux partition ALWAYS use a LiveCD/USB, because all internal partitions must be unmounted (not blocked by the installed Ubuntu). You are doing that, which is very good. In GParted, right-click on the swap partition and choose swapoff. You can't resize or move it if it's not off (unused). Then move it out of the way, ...


0

Please,please backup your data if you choose to do this, i don't hold any liability for your data damage. You will need. -A Live USB/CD-drive to boot up with. Lets begin! Use Ubuntu on Try Ubuntu without Installing option. Gparted should be present, if not use sudo apt-get install gparted Hunt down your partition. Yeah I'm not a ubuntu expert, so it ...


0

Depends entirely upon your bios and exactly what level of automation you desire. Suppose.... you have 2 HDD. You can install win on 1 HDD and ubuntu on 1 HDD. When booting, some bios will enable a function key that allows you to select which HDD is the boot HDD for your session. To test this, burn the ubuntu iso to a DVD or a usb stick, and try to boot from ...


0

Yes you can choose the disk you want the installer to put Grub (bootloader). You just need to know how to set the partitioning yourself manually. When choosing how to install Ubuntu where the first option is to "Erase entire disk and install Ubuntu", the last option is "Something else" Choose that and you will be presented a GUI to handle partitioning. ...


1

It sounds like GRUB is installed on USB B - so your system will only boot, even into Windows, when USB B is connected. When USB B is disconnected the boot loader can't find GRUB and fails. You can run boot repair and make sure that GRUB is installed on your internal hard disk - e.g. sda https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair


0

Try unplugging and repluggin your hard drive. Alternatively, boot from the install media with the drive plugged in. If it's there, re-install Ubuntu.


1

In Ubuntu, use the command sudo efibootmgr -v to see the UEFI boot order, and the command sudo efibootmgr -o XXXX,YYYY,... where the XXXX etc. are the numnbers on the boot items. Put Ubuntu's shimx64.efi bootloader first, or grubx64.efi if you are not using secure boot. On some machines you might need to set the UEFI Settings/BIOS supervisor ...


0

Which Ubuntu release are we talking about? The Ubuntu 16.04 install media dropped persistence, but an older 14.04 release still has it. If you just made another partition with a FAT filesystem on the install media, labeled it "casper-rw", and edited the grub boot command to add the wrord "persistent" to the linux kernel line, it might work though (never ...


1

In your original answer, you wrote: When you install Windows, Windows assumes it is the only operating system (OS) on the machine, or at least it does not account for Linux. So it replaces GRUB with its own boot loader. This isn't true under EFI. Well, Windows is still pretty rude, and could be said to assume it's the only OS, but it does not replace ...


3

This warning appears if kernel function trace_module_has_bad_taint() returns true; namely any of the following taint flags have been set: TAINT_FORCED_MODULE (module loading has been forced) TAINT_CPU_OUT_OF_SPEC (CPU is behaving in a way that may cause tracing issues?) TAINT_FORCED_RMMOD (module has been forced removed) TAINT_MACHINE_CHECK (Machine Check ...


0

try sudo shutdown OR sudo reboot if you want to restart, in a terminal. if you cannot access terminal for some reason, then press Ctrl+Alt+F1 then login using your user name and password, then use sudo shutdown again. if you want to return back to your desktop screen press Ctrl+Alt+F7


0

I just use Alt+F2 to get to a login prompt on a VT, log in and then run startx (I have Xfce installed on a 701 with 16.04 vanilla Ubuntu however, via the mini iso just on the 4GB SSD).


0

http://www.howtogeek.com/114884/how-to-repair-grub2-when-ubuntu-wont-boot/ This website will walk you through the steps I used to fix this exact problem with the bootloader.


0

Try this: Insert Ubuntu Live-Dvd/Usb. Ensure the bios boot order is set to read the media first and start the computer Select Ubuntu Live / Try mode. Click on purple Ubuntu search button - enter gnome-terminal and click on its icon In a terminal run: exec sudo -i mount /dev/sda4 /mnt mkdir /mnt/boot/efi mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot/efi for i in /dev /dev/...


0

If your problems are solved, look at the following link for additional ideas of what to try: Installing Ubuntu on a Pre-Installed Windows with UEFI



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