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You've already got two working USB keys. You probably don't need to make another. Unless you're having an Ubuntu themed party, I suppose. That's not an error related to the creation of the USB Boot Drive. That's an error you get after the dd operation completes successfully. OS X can't read the contents of a properly created Ubuntu boot drive. You now need ...


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I might guess that there is no bootflag, but I don't think that is the case here. Try FAT32, it's readable by almost everycomputer, at least x86 and ppc, maybe not the latter.


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Does the Windows Boot Manager option in the firmware still boot Windows? There are some bkp-prefixed files, that shouldn't exist in EFI/Microsoft, leading me to believe this is another case of boot-repair bringing more confusion to UEFI setups than necessary. Backup the whole data on the partition, copy the bkp files back to where they should be (just ...


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Might be bug #1091464. (Grub cannot boot Windows 8 with secure boot on) Try turning off secure boot and see if it works.


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I failed it dont work if i make a skript in Grub costumizer and save it it dont shows on the boot menu if i open the grub costumizer again the skript is deleted. this is my code : set root='(hd0,3)' `search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 28D9FDF951298246 linux android-x86/kernel root=UUID=28D9FDF951298246 quiet androidboot.hardware=generic_x86 ...


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Short answer : Yes if they have boot from USB Longer answer : Only if they meet the required specs for Ubuntu (and any modifications you made), also I tried this once and had various bugs on different hardware due to things like drivers, graphics could be a issue I don't know how a AMD GPU would react to finding the Nvidia driver. But for me at least it ...


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This is from XDA Developers For GRUB 1.97 - 1.99 & 2.00 + To make it easy, install GRUB Customizer Type these into terminal emulator : Code: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer Open GRUB customizer, make a new GRUB entry. Open 'Sources' tab, type these : Code: set ...


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I changed the video driver that the Ubuntu install picked The ports make me think it was related to PCI. PCI is the bus where the video card is. I changed the video driver and fixed the issue. In order to get to it I booted in recovery then picked continue to boot from the top recovery option. I could see only one of my dual monitors came up so another clue ...


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I had the same issue. There is no software solution that I can find. What I did end up doing was buying the Fit PC Headless HDMI dongle. It's about $15, and mimics an attached HDMI display. http://www.fit-pc.com/web/products/fit-headless/


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-----x /etc/default/grub - This file contains information formerly contained in the upper section of Grub Legacy's menu.lst and items contained on the end of the kernel line. The items in this file can be edited by a user with administrator (root) privileges. Quote: # If you change this file, run 'update-grub' afterwards to ...


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Both do not work. Works only this variant: title Install Ubuntu 14.04 amd64 find --set-root /iso/ubuntu-14.04-desktop-amd64.iso map --unmap=0:0xff map --unhook root (hd0,0) map /iso/ubuntu-14.04-desktop-amd64.iso (0xff) || map --mem /iso/ubuntu-14.04-desktop-amd64.iso (0xff) || map --mem --heads=0 --sectors-per-track=0 /iso/ubuntu-14.04-desktop-amd64.iso ...


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Some quick hints: To check the memory, boot from the install CD and select memtest (see here for details) To check the disks you can use Disks, the Gnome utility. More about all this in this article. Hope this helps...


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i used fsarchiver in SystemrescueCD(www.sysresccd.org). Steps to backup and restore: Boot with SystemrescueCD type fsarchiver probe in terminal to see the devices to save the Ubuntu 14.04(partition) in /dev/sdb1 as a .fsa file, type the below command in terminal $fsarchiver savefs -j2 -o /media/masha/Data/backup/backup/Ubuntu1404.fsa /dev/sdb1 NOTE: ...


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On Ubuntu you can use usb-creator-gtk. On Windows you can use http://www.linuxliveusb.com/.


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Just install Grub Customizer: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer && apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer Then there you can select which OS to boot at first.


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You would need to create an MBR on the drive, and then partition it in two pieces one being Fat32 or NTFS and the other being ext3/ext4. All that being said, YUMI would have to re-write all of the partition tables when it is writing the iso's. I think that this will get you going in the right direction: link When you install Ubuntu, it generally rewrites ...


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I do not think you can install Ubuntu to a NTFS flash drive. Using FAT should allow it to work. Using ext4 is recommended as it's linux native. The only downside is you can't access any files from the drive while in Windows. If you have a big enough flash drive, try creating a small FAT32 partition for storing data and then creating an ext4 partition for ...


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Try installing Ubuntu and moving home directory to your new system. If you need to move it and it's a proper installation (not live version) then use dd bs=4M if=/dev/partition_on_pendrive of=/dev/partition_on_disk Then chroot into partition you've created and install grub. Don't forget about swap.


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First, UEFI is 64 bit only for most of the usual situations. I don't know why you couldn't create a 64 bit live media with the 64 bit iso on a 32 bit machine -- it's just copying files around. Heck, use dd and files don't even enter the copy if really necessary. Second, UEFI on a gpt disk needs a bootable, FAT32 partition of 300M. NOT the grub-bios flag ...


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Solution was to do these commands from liveDVD, it allows me to do things on my sda1 from that liveDVD(as far I understand) sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mntsudo mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev sudo mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc sudo mount --bind /sys /mnt/sys sudo chroot /mnt update-initramfs -u update-grub reboot A friend of mine from ubuntu pl forum ...


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People may frown on this if they want, but I have found that using "/dev/sdX" works more reliably for me than UUID for my personal systems. In an enterprise environment, I would put more effort into making it work with the UUID instead of the "/dev/" address, but you should be safe using "/dev/sdaX" in /etc/fstab instead of UUID reference, at least to be ...


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Refresh your MAC address using Virtual Box machine settings and remove the kernel’s networking interface rules file so that it can be regenerated: sudo rm -f /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules sudo reboot It will work for your clone VM.


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It seems the boot order in your BIOS is "wrong", but it's not apparent because the boot loader skips unpartitioned media. My BIOS setup offers a separate configuration option for the boot order of individual hard drives, which is sometimes messed up, after I (dis-)connect (non-boot) drives.


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Burn Plop Boot Manager to CD. Boot your computer to the CD, and Plop Boot Manager will give you an option to boot up your USB. Here is the link for Plop Boot Manager: http://www.plop.at/en/bootmanagers.html


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Easiest way, set the Ubuntu Hard Drive as your first/primary drive. Then in terminal run sudo grub-update That should automatically recognize the other Windows partitions on the other drives and add them automatically. You can also change the primary boot partition in: /etc/default/grub


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Being able to boot to a USB from the GRUB menu strikes me as unusual. This would only happen if you ran sudo update-grub while the USB was mounted. In my experience most users only add operating systems to GRUB that are on internal hard drives, although I'm not sure if there are any actual advantages or disadvantages in doing so. Normally I just boot a USB ...


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According to NeoSmart Knowledgebase (creators of EasyBCD): Fix 0xc0000001 in Windows 8 Windows 8 users may fix this boot error without an installation disc by using the Windows Startup Settings (see Fix #1 below). Fix #1: Use Windows Startup Settings Restart your computer Press SHIFT + F8 when booting to open the Recovery screen ...


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The boot loader of Windows (ntloader) didn't detect Ubuntu and hence only showing Windows. You may just have to reinstall the GRUB loader of Ubuntu. see the following link: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RecoveringUbuntuAfterInstallingWindows


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Sounds like you're using a UEFI system. When you create usb installers they are typically for mbr bios only, it depends what program you use to make it. Install using a DVD and it should work fine.


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OK boot your live DVD and choose try Ubuntu, press the ubuntu button (top left) and open a terminal and enter these commands, one at a time. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo sed 's/trusty/saucy/g' -i /etc/apt/sources.list.d/yannubuntu-boot-repair-trusty.list sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && ...


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try using easy bcd to dual boot http://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/ find the instructions on this page https://neosmart.net/wiki/easybcd/dual-boot/linux/ubuntu/


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use a bootable usb with boot repair, or install boot repair using ubuntu live usb, https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair this link has the details alternatively if you have a windows disk try this http://www.tweakhound.com/2012/11/13/how-to-fix-the-windows-bootloader/ good luck


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try disabling fast startup in bios and then try, boot using the dvd, alternatively you could make a usb bootable using unetbootin I had the same problem, but unetbootin fixed it http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/ here is the link hope it works, good luck


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Assuming your computer supports boot from USB, you may have to enable it to do so in your BIOS settings. Access the BIOS settings by pressing the appropriate key at startup (varies from machine to machine, typically one of the function keys. google your machine to find out what it is), then go to the boot options and ensure boot from USB is enabled. If this ...


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By default, Ubuntu installs using a legacy BIOS type boot sequence, whereas Windows 8 is most likely booting via EFI. Try interrupting the bootup on your machine with the appropriate key (F10, F9, F12, F2, or whatever it is on your particular model of pc) and selecting the Windows boot loader there rather than letting GRUB take control. By the time GRUB ...


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Unfortunately, all software (including Live USB creators) contains bugs. I assume this is an issue with Pendrivelinux (which I experienced to be very buggy.) Give UNetBootin a chance. It is the best and safest Live USB creator I ever used, any I tried lots of them... (And don't be afraid of UNetBootin's boot menu, as some people reported to me...)


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upstart and systemd are init systems. By convention (and perhaps other constraints), the program is still called init, irrespective of whether systemd or upstart or something else is at play. Don't let the process name fool you. PID1 is not SysV init any longer. It hasn't been for quite some time on Ubuntu.


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I presume you meant that the power failure happened during upgrades, not during a new installation. Try the following. Go into recovery mode. mount --options remount,rw / mount --all sudo apt-get --fix-broken install sudo dpkg --configure --pending Reboot, log in and open a terminal. (If you can't log in, reboot to recovery mode with networking, ...


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I have UX32VD laptop and found same problem. This realy comming up when switched to Nvidia. Same freezes to me, so I do like ber4444 said Ctrl+Alt+F1 then Ctrl+Alt+F7 then Alt+Tab. Related bug seems to be fixed https://bugzilla.kernel.org/show_bug.cgi?id=74931 already by patch.


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See the manual for init on Unix systems. This is a post from the Wikipedia entry on init: In Unix-based computer operating systems, init (short for initialization) is the first process started during booting of the computer system. Init is a daemon process that continues running until the system is shut down. It is the direct or indirect ancestor of all ...


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Most likely your installation is botched. What you can try doing before reinstalling the operating system is physically removing the battery from your laptop while the laptop is plugged into the AC Adapter. Hypothetically, the OS should skip the check after determining that the battery isn't present. Additionally, if you want to try and restore the ...


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The login screen is called greeter in Ubuntu. While I can't think of exact fix, I can suggest a work-around. Basic idea is changing the greeter. Now, depending on which desktop manager program you are using , the configuration settings will be different. I assume you have lightdm manager, which is default that comes with Ubuntu. Here's procedure for ...


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After trying all POPULAR distros I was able to install and BOOT PCLINUXOS on my HP DV7. Thanks all members trying to help. Orhan TOPRAK


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One possibility you might want to consider is getting a USB Rubber Duckey to do the job. It is a flash drive-shaped device that impersonates a keyboard to deliver its payload of key presses, the way you might if you were typing to it without a screen. That way, she can just plug it in the same way she would with a regular flash drive.


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your upgrade is most likely ruined, and your files are most likely lost. But I would create a live-CD/USB and boot it. This is to see if your files are still there so you can make a backup. Click on try Ubuntu and then try to mount the hard drive/SSD and make a backup of your files. then I would make a clean install. You might be able to fix the broken ...


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As far as I know you cannot do this with ecryptfs, but it should be possible with LUKS. I don't know how it would work out in your scenario with a headless server and the given circumstances. I think it would result in the key being always plugged in. I'd suggest buying and configuring a UPS and OOB over the USB-key method. Mount LUKS encrypted hard ...


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After many unhappy hours trying to get the procedures in from kdmurray above to work, without success I eventually found a method that worked simply. First my Linux host (Mint 17) was set up at boot time to login automatically to my main account. Second I used the facilities in VirtualBox GUI (v4.3.12) to create a shortcut for each Virtual Machine on the ...


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If you set your bios to boot from it you probably can but it's probably easier to install ubuntu from a flash drive. To do this you'll need your iso that you are currently downloading and a program called UNetBootin and of course a flash drive of minimal 1 gb. Next up is making the usb bootable. This can be done by the following steps: 1) insert your usb. ...


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Have you tried the boot-repair-disk? When I couldn't run ubuntu, even after use of boot-repair, this image helped me. p.s. Mega - it's 1000 0000. Mebi it's 1024x1024. That's why you got MiB instead of MB.


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Try installing it again following the same method. This should sort everything out and give your installation a fair chance.



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