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If you take a look through /etc/init folder, the command responsible for bringing up TTY is getty. For each TTY there is a *.conf file in /etc/init , so if you want colorized prompt on every TTY, you will have to edit every single one of those files. Now, the file responsible for the contents of that appear on the screen before logging in is /etc/issue, ...


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You could have still startd the programs with their full path, for example /usr/bin/vim. Since most programs didn't work for you, you could have checked packages.ubuntu.com for their paths: http://packages.ubuntu.com/trusty/amd64/nano/filelist Alternatively you could have booted into recovery mode and opened a shell there I guess.


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If you have multiple installs using grub2, only one of them can be in MBR and controls booting. That usually is the last install. And you may have issues if you installed both originally to MBR of same drive. Grub remembers where it installed and a major update of grub will reinstall it. Or either or both installs may be updating grub. I like to document how ...


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Edit your /etc/default/grub sudo nano /etc/default/grub Find out this line - GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" Change it to - GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="text" Update Grub - sudo update-grub For systems that use systemd This is an additional step for systemd releases, eg: Ubuntu 15.04 You need to tell systemd to not load the graphical ...


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If you are running a system with systemd, check out this post: http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/126146/130303 If you are running an "older" ubuntu version (14.04), check here: http://superuser.com/a/248671


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Your wifi might be disable for several reasons. I suggest you look into the logs (journalctl -b -0 if you use a recent version of Ubuntu). This might be a problem with your network-manager configuration (assuming you use network-manager to access Internet, which is the default in Ubuntu), which can be found in the folder /var/lib/NetworkManager/. EDIT: ...


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If you have successfully dual booted Windows UEFI with Ubuntu 14.04 in the past, you can use exact same steps to dual boot Windows UEFI and Ubuntu 15.04. There is no difference here.


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You need the Universe repositories to install gksu. Therefore Open Software and Updates and use the first tab Ubuntu Software and select the line Community-maintained free and open-source software (universe) After that, install the package via: sudo apt-get install gksu Now start boot-repair again. Or the terminal way: Open the file ...


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The path to Ubuntu efi loader should be added to your motherboard UEFI. Boot from Ubuntu LiveUSB and run in terminal: sudo efibootmgr -c -l "\EFI\UBUNTU\SHIMX64.EFI" -L ubuntu Then reboot normally. You will get a boot option "ubuntu". If your EFI partition is not the default /dev/sda1, then the command will look this way: sudo efibootmgr -c -l ...



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