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New versions of Ubuntu have ureadahead enabled by default, which improves boot speed using the same broad method, but is more adaptable: it works for both HDD and SSD rather than just HDD, and it pretty much just works without any manual intervention, detecting when you make a change to the boot process, re-monitoring the boot process and re-compiling its ...


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After playing and searching around, I found that I could enter the GRUB menu by holding down F11, then pressing "e" on "install ubuntu" i then looked for where it said "quick splash --" and changed it to "nomodeset $vt_handoff" this allowed my system to boot it all up and after installing I played around with the /etc/default/grub file and changed around ...


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You should first ensure that the /etc/network/interfaces file contains at least the loopback interface configuration: auto lo iface lo inet loopback Next, if you have any auto stanzas and the interfaces might not be available at boot, you can replace auto with allow-hotplug to prevent upstart from waiting for them to be brought up (i.e. replace auto eth0 ...


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It's not an error, it just tells you that the partition /dev/sda1 has been remounted with the mount option errors=remount-ro. It's nothing you need to worry about. It may happen e.g. during a normal system startup if /dev/sda1 is your root partition. The mount option means that the system should mount the partition read-only if an error occurs to minimize ...


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Such device names are not persistent, udev makes no guarantees that they will be the same. The Arch Wiki says: Because udev loads all modules asynchronously, they are initialized in a different order. This can result in devices randomly switching names. A udev rule can be added to use static device names. You should use labels or UUIDs instead. ...


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This process will wipe OS X and any other data you have on the machine. Please make sure to backup your system before proceeding. You may wish to create a recovery disk so that you may restore OSX at a later date, if required. Create a live USB containing Ubuntu Refer to this page for detailed instructions. UNetbootin is recommended since it is cross ...


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If you still have access to the bash shell,try updating the grub to look for devices to mount sudo update-grub This may help in mounting the partition while booting.


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Well, it looks like it is indeed a hardware issue, as you both mentioned heating up and also the fact that both systems started misbehaving again yesterday. What were you doing exactly when it heated up? (physical conditions, like where the laptop was whenever that happened)


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Each time you upgrade the kernel, the older versions are kept, just in case something goes wrong with the new one, and these accumulate over time, that's why you eventually ran out of space. You can check out which versions are installed by running: dpkg -l linux-image-\* | grep ^ii. And then remove them using: sudo apt-get remove --purge .... Just remember ...


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The issue you are facing is due to a bug in older versions of the Linux kernel, < 3.15. The bug report can be found here. To solve the problem, enter the following commands - cd /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/kernel/drivers/bluetooth/ cp ath3k.ko ath3k.ko.orig cp btusb.ko btusb.ko.orig sed -e 's/\xf3\x0c\x05\x30/\xf3\x0c\x05\xe0/g' ...


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If you want to install it "over" your existing vanilla installation, you can do that through the software center. It's called ubuntu-gnome-desktop. You can also install this by opening a terminal and typing the following commands sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install ubuntu-gnome-desktop


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It should be possible to boot the external drive automatically only when the external drive is connected. Just install windows to the external drive and set the external drive or USB (if it connects via USB port) as the first bootloader device in the BIOS settings. When the drive is not connected, the next bootloader device (internal drive) will ...


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That's weird you don't see bios/grub menu's on the monitor. Do you have the laptop lid open? Also, it would help if we knew what laptop model it was. Usually you can boot to a live cd even in the state that it's in. Just plug in a monitor with the computer lid closed(but open just enough so you can turn it on) so you get video so you can a least know what ...


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Thanks for posting the boot chart. I'm no expert but I noticed these issues: Toward the start of the boot, there's a fsck followed by a mount operation that is taking a long time (over 20 seconds). A fair bit of later stuff seems to be waiting for this operation. Further on in the boot, there is what looks like gpu-manager running a "find" operation that ...


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All the files needed until you boot to desktop might be scattered or at-least away from start of the partition which happened while your system was getting upgraded, since new files are written to disk and after that old files are remove(of-course its done so that you can revert back if upgrade is not successful) this way new files are written away from ...


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The best idea will be to use a boot repair disk, just download iso and burn it into USB drive, and it will do all the hard stuff itself for you :) more details at https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair EDIT: if you need direct steps: Download http://sourceforge.net/p/boot-repair-cd/home/Home/ burn it into USB using Universal USB installer (google ...


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This link tells you how to boot Ubuntu in recovery mode (provided you're using the Grub bootloader): https://wiki.ubuntu.com/RecoveryMode If that doesn't work then you can always create a live CD/USB from another machine and boot up with that to recover your system. If you don't know how to do that I can post links to some useful resources.



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