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If you have EFI, then there will be an EFI System Partition (ESP) on the disk. This partition has to be mounted on /boot/efi, so that GRUB can use it. The partition: is formatted FAT32, is usually small (100MB < size < 500MB) will have the boot flag enabled contains an EFI folder could be labelled EFI by the OEM, but no guarantees I don't have one ...


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Had the same problem earlier today. Found out here (https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=195223) that could be a plymouth related problem, and after removing it (I'm really not into looping logins animations anyway...), I got into trouble with nvidia drivers. I just removed all nvidia related software and, voilà, I'm here typing this answer. sudo ...


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It seems like your harddisk is using MBR partition table and your are trying to boot computer using UEFI. Go to BIOS and change BOOT OPTION to Legacy, and try again.


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I don't want to duplicate a post for potential policy violation so I will link my answer for this problem. In short I have a Samsung laptop with Windows 10 already installed and I was trying to install linux with multiple instances; Ubuntu 12.04, 14.04, and 16.04. I used Boot-Repair and changed Boot Priority in my Setup BIOS which resulted in a functional, ...


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With cutting edge hardware, you need the newest versions of software, and sometimes even ppa's to get newer than in standard distributions. If using gparted, be sure to download the newest version: gparted should be at least version 0.24.0-1 to recognize NVMe devices http://gparted.sourceforge.net/index.php Since 16.04 is now released.But be sure to ...


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In Ubuntu 16.04 the boot.log file is still located in the /var/log folder as you can see here. The boot logfile is from today (2016-04-29). Maybe something went wrong when you installed Ubuntu 16.04 or have upgraded the operating system from Ubuntu 15.10 to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Alternatively you can examine the general boot behavior from the comprehensive ...


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It isn't recomend but you can resize current partition and create, make bootable another one using GParted. This flash drive may not work correctly on some systems.


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Im not familiar with that program but if I want my computer to boot to a different kernel I just manually edit the grub file located at: /etc/default/grub Look for GRUB_DEFAULT=0 (or whatever your default is set too) Change that line to the kernel you want loaded ... looking at your list there it looks like 0 would be the standard 4.4.8 and 3 would be ...


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Ok .. Decided to give it Grub Customizer a try on a VM box so I didn't screw anything up. I was able to change the default kernel without any issues. Here is how I did it. In the General settings tab I clicked the pulldown for predefined. It listed all the kernels available. I chose the 3.19.0-58-generic and clicked save ... I rebooted into that kernel. ...


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According to this : https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/llvm-toolchain-3.8/+bug/1564156 This bug will be fixed in 16.04.1 All credit goes to Joakim Koed (joakimkoed) who came with a good option. What you need to do is: boot with nomodeset (press E after grub is booted and add nomodeset after quiet splash and press F10 (if I remember correctly)) ...


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Applying the "Permanent fix using the defective bootable USB itself" from LeoRochael's answer for the same problem in 14.04LTS in the link below http://askubuntu.com/a/746412/534406 works (worked for me going from 14.04LTS to 16.04LTS). This has the advantage that future boots from the USB stick will go to the graphical interface.


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You can try to find out what is taking the most time with systemd systemd-analyze blame


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I tried Boot Repair Disc and worked like a charm.


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Run sudo apt-get install --reinstall kubuntu-desktop plasma-desktop plasma-desktop-data sddm xorg xserver-xorg-core xserver-xorg-video-intel && sudo dpkg-reconfigure sddm The 1st part will reinstall kubuntu's KDE plasma, the X11 display server, the sddm display manager, and the intel video driver; the next will allow you to set it as the default ...


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You will need a windows 7/8/10 disc or bootable usb. Boot from windows boot media. Select your language and press next. Then click on repair your computer option in bottom left. Now depending on which windows disc you have, you need to find the command promt option in repair your computer menu. It is usually under advanced options. Once you get yourself ...


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It is very difficult to type in a constantly switching console, but not impossible. I found out that the constant switching was caused by gdm3, so I stopped stopped it: sudo /etc/init.d/gdm3 stop I could probably have done it by ssh-ing to my desktop as well, which would probably have spared me the difficulty of having to type in a constantly switching ...


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It looks like something not set correctly in BIOS. So first go to the BIOS (look which Fxx key is the "BIOS-entry" key on your model of computer) and look around. There may be Allow USB boot option somewhere. If there is -> enable it. Than search for Boot order menu. You should set the "boot from USB" before "boot from HD". Make sure that you have the ...


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If the message is something like /dev/sda2: clean, 201776/60878736 files, 4991277/243040256 blocks You need to do ... nothing, thats perfectly fine, this message should normaly be invisible but somehow it snuck to visbility. It just tells you that there are no orphaned nodes and that your journal is clean.


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Systemd is responsible for booting process. You can improve it by disabling some services or trying to fix your configuration. To check how much time services take in your boot process you can run: systemd-analyze blame For graphical detailed view of your boot procedure you can generate a plot image: systemd-analyze plot > bootimage Now you can open ...


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As long as you ensure that non of the data on the encrypted partition is needed to enable a system boot you could just remove the reference to it from /etc/crypttab to stop it from being auto-mounted at boot. Alternatively you could leave the reference in place but add the noauto option. As for the swap the easiest solution here is just to have it be ...


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You can fix this in following way, it worked for me. FYI : I had upgraded from 14.04 to 16.04. Go in your safe mode by hitting SHIFT key or ESC. select networking , then drop to root prompt. Then run following commands. sudo apt-get remove plymouth sudo apt-get remove xserver-xorg-video-intel Now, reboot, When you reboot, still you may get black or ...


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First of all, is Ubuntu free of charge? Yes Second, now I am using Windows, do I need to have a disk partition? In general yes. Each installed operating system needs at least its own partition. Keep in mind: for testing Ubuntu or any other operating system it might make sense to check out a Virtual Machine like Virtualbox, VMware or similar. ...


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The software you are mentioning isn't safer than the one built into Ubuntu. No need to purchase anything special. The software you are talking about uses "256-bit AES encryption" according to their website. You can have an encryption using the same algorithm using the "cryptsetup" on Ubuntu with a regular thumb drive, see for example: ...



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