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This warning appears if kernel function trace_module_has_bad_taint() returns true; namely any of the following taint flags have been set: TAINT_FORCED_MODULE (module loading has been forced) TAINT_CPU_OUT_OF_SPEC (CPU is behaving in a way that may cause tracing issues?) TAINT_FORCED_RMMOD (module has been forced removed) TAINT_MACHINE_CHECK (Machine Check ...


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When you install MS Windows 10, it overwrites the Grub contents in MBR to its own. All your Windows and Linux OS files are intact and good. All you need to do here is to repair you GRUB files. I used boot-repair and it worked very well for me. If you want to fresh install everything, Install Windows 10 first and then install Ubuntu. It is possible from ...


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I didn't properly burn iso to dvd. SOLVED


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In your original answer, you wrote: When you install Windows, Windows assumes it is the only operating system (OS) on the machine, or at least it does not account for Linux. So it replaces GRUB with its own boot loader. This isn't true under EFI. Well, Windows is still pretty rude, and could be said to assume it's the only OS, but it does not replace ...


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Regarding Android x86 6.0 The "EEEPC" assignment is only for ASUS EEEPCs, only use it if you have one, otherwise use android_x86, do not use generic_x86, you will get stuck at the boot animation and have to restart by using CTRL+F1 to access the terminal and issue reboot as the GUI will not get loaded. I know this because I spent several hours following bad, ...


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I have had this, but only in 16.04 (not 14.04). I fixed it by booting with systemd by going into Advanced Options for Ubuntu in the GRUB menu and selecting my-kernel-version (systemd). Then once I booted I made systemd the default boot: sudo apt-get install systemd-sysv


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In case of problems with logging in: it could be that purging deleted a needed file in /home/$USER/ or it changed permissions on a needed file. If the problems occur before login it is more than likely related to the video card driver. 1st thing to do is to go to a TTY (control alt f1). You can use apt-get to re-install ubuntu with: sudo apt-get install ...


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Install a program called 'syslinux' by sudo apt-get install syslinux. Then create/obtain an ISO9660 file (e.g. filename.iso). In a terminal window type: isohybrid filename.iso. Now the iso file is hybrid, you can use it as CD and USB image file. The hybridization process will change the checksum of the file. Make sure to check it against the new checksum. ...


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First check if Windows is still there (not erased by mistake). Boot into a Live Ubuntu and open GParted. Check partition map and look for ntfs partitions labeled msftdata, Windows, etc. If Windows is still there, insert the Win install disk and reboot into it (remove the Live Ubuntu medium while restarting the PC). Let the Wins install process begin and ...


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Resolved by deleting the config folder and then rebooting.


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This is almost certainly an unneeded file as the naming convention for the map files in /boot is as follows: andrew@athens:~$ ls /boot | grep -E *map* System.map-4.4.0-15-generic System.map-4.4.0-22-generic Test this on your own system, this is on Xenial Xerus 16.04. The file can be safely left in place but if you are at all worried simply back the file ...


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Bring your system up-to-date, reinstall the unity-settings-daemon and reboot your system: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get --reinstall install unity-settings-daemon sudo reboot This could already solve the issue...


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It sounds like GRUB is installed on USB B - so your system will only boot, even into Windows, when USB B is connected. When USB B is disconnected the boot loader can't find GRUB and fails. You can run boot repair and make sure that GRUB is installed on your internal hard disk - e.g. sda https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair


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In Ubuntu, use the command sudo efibootmgr -v to see the UEFI boot order, and the command sudo efibootmgr -o XXXX,YYYY,... where the XXXX etc. are the numnbers on the boot items. Put Ubuntu's shimx64.efi bootloader first, or grubx64.efi if you are not using secure boot. On some machines you might need to set the UEFI Settings/BIOS supervisor ...



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