Hot answers tagged

17

You cannot uninstall GRUB. As your installation stands, GRUB is necessary to boot Ubuntu (that's why it's called the bootloader). Every OS has a bootloader, and every OS needs that bootloader to boot (lots of booting :P). EDIT: As people in the comments have pointed out, there are alternatives to using GRUB. However, there is no reason to switch to one, ...


6

All the other answers start good, advising you that GRUB is usually there whether you see it or not, you probably shouldn't start taking random potshots at it, and how to restore your system to the 'hidden GRUB' you (presumably) previously enjoyed. However, they end up going wrong - in making blanket statements that GRUB is always required, when this is ...


5

Boot into Windows, open command prompt as administrator and execute: powercfg /h off Open Windows Control Panel -> Power Settings and uncheck Fast startup. In case it is not visible, enable show hidden settings. Shutdown the machine completely - do NOT reboot. Now you should be able to boot from Ubuntu DVD.


4

Repair GRUB boot loader with a built-in tool. Boot from the Ubuntu installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing. On Live desktop open a terminal. Execute these commands : sudo mount /dev/sd** /mnt sudo grub-install --boot-directory=/mnt/boot /dev/sd* Note : sd* = disk | sd** = system partition Use GParted to identify the partition ...


3

Install the NVIDIA drivers this way ... I assume you have NVIDIA GEFORCE 400 graphics or newer : Remove the NVIDIA software you have tried to install. Highlight the Ubuntu menu entry and press the E key. Add nouveau.modeset=0 to the end of the linux line. Press the F10 key to boot into the Ubuntu system. When the login screen appears press Ctrl+Alt+F1. ...


2

You've got the lot: Logical volumes, overlapping partitions, unknown file systems, ... So: the best thing you can do right now is to stop using your hard disk! Then boot from an Ubuntu 15.10 Live DVD and: (increasing numbers means increasing difficulty and less of your data will be recovered) Restore your latest full system back-up. If you don't have a ...


2

The problem in your case is that, in the image shown above your 289.09GB HDD is of MBR (Master Boot record)partition style which only supports up to 4 primary partitions (i.e blue partitions) . If you want more than 4 partitions then you have to create an extended partition such that the total HDD has 3 primary and 1 extended partition. Then from that ...


2

Seems like the package python-gtk2 was missing. I installed it: sudo apt-get install python-gtk2 That explains the difference in Python's sys.path (/usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/gtk-2.0 was missing). But on the other machine where the entry was present, according to aptitude why, the package was only installed as dependency of ...


2

It looks like you've got a flaky EFI that's forgetting its settings. I recommend you look through the firmware's options to see if there's one to reset its options to the factory defaults. (Such an option usually exists.) If so, use it, then try either running Boot Repair again or re-install rEFInd (boot to Ubuntu in any way you can and run sudo ...


1

It depends on how you boot the installer. If you boot it in EFI/UEFI mode, it should go on the EFI System Partition (ESP). If you boot it in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode, it will probably go to the MBR of /dev/sda, but might conceivably go to the MBR of /dev/sdb. Either way, that's probably not what you want.... Backing up, in a dual-boot scenario, it's important ...


1

I had this issue, and my efi partition was full. I think this caused the issue because installation always stopped at that drive, and displayed the initramfs prompt as stated in this issue. I tried many of the fixes on this page and many other pages. It took days to figure out which fix would work. I finally created a USB boot drive on my WIN 10 machine ...


1

I had the same issue, and I deleted all known files, and directories, but still kept getting the pop up messages. I finally ran across this link : https://forums.virtualbox.org/viewtopic.php?t=7839 The info that worked were the first 2 lines of these Sudo Commands, the rest were all ready done manually by me. sudo find /etc -name "vboxadd" -exec rm {} \; ...


1

I found out eventually. Edit /boot/grub/grub.cfg Find ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober ### menuentry 'Windows 10 (loader) (on /dev/sdXX)' After chainloader +1 Write ntldr /bootmgr It did the trick and fixes the shit. Thanks all for your hints.


1

Ubuntu Desktop edition requires (I cite the 2 main elements): 700 MHz processor 512 MiB RAM Toshiba Satellite C650 fulfills these requirements largely. So yes, you can install Ubuntu on it. And since you run Windows 8.1, surely you can run Ubuntu too on it. For your second question, the simple answer is no, your pre-installed system won't be erased: ...


1

Not sure what computer brand you are using, but instead of hitting F12 for boot options try using F2 (or what ever option gets you into CMOS) and right arrow over to the "boot" tab. Here you can choose which drive to boot from (the Linux drive or the Windows Drive). Select the drive you want to boot from, hit F10 to save changes and reboot. Also try ...


1

Fixed! After a lot trials I managed it to work. I reinstalled xserver and nouveau. Though I had also updated Unity to 8 before thinking that it might have corrupted. :P So if anyone is having same issues can do this ;)


1

All Ubuntu kernels are signed to be used with secure boot starting with Ubuntu 12.04. So you can install Ubuntu 14.04 or 15.10 in secure boot mode with no problem.


1

To enable the grub menu to select the kernel, you have to comment the line in /etc/default/grub #GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 Then you have to run update-grub and reboot and the grub menu should appear.


1

Have you disabled secure boot in your BIOS? Also if your Windows 10 is EFI mode you need to install Ubuntu also in EFI mode. Any specific reasons why you are not going for LTS release - 14.04.3? Not clear from your question "overwriting Windows 10" - are you completely getting rid of Windows 10? In case you are done with all the stuff mentioned above and ...


1

A MCE (Machine Check Error) is a type of computer hardware error that occurs when a computer's central processing unit detects a hardware problem. This usually indicates you might have a hardware issue. Usually when I've encountered an MCE I have a bad stick of memory but I can't be certain this is your problem. Please run a memory test.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible