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2

It's probably a graphics card issue. Try this: Reboot in recovery mode. Go to System Settings > Software & Updates > Additional Drivers Select the driver that matches your graphic card.


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If you download and install the 64 bit version from here and install it from a USB, simply choose the option you are presented with to delete everything and replace with Ubuntu. The installer will take care of the partitioning for you.


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It is possible that bits of code may get dragged around from kernel to kernel - during the unpacking/install - It is also possible to go back to an older kernel. At the grub boot menu choose the Kernel you want to boot to - Once you have chosen the Kernel you want to keep and you have booted into it uname -r will tell you what kernel you are currently ...


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While as @solsTiCe's comment that installing Linux or specifically Ubuntu won't give your PC more resources is true, it will however make more efficient use of those resources. If you wish to continue using your PC without upgrading hardware - then that is entirely possible with Ubuntu. It will even arguably work faster than with Windows as your hardware ...


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From the output of your boot-repair command, it looks like you have an UEFI system… However, Ubuntu is installed in non-UEFI mode, and Windows is installed in UEFI mode so only one of the two is going to work at a time without changing the boot parameters… The best you can do is: re-install Windows 10 in non-UEFI mode or reinstall Ubuntu in UEFI mode ...


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There are some peculiarities about your installation: Your computer has two Windows Recovery Environment partitions, /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda5. My guess is one is from your previous Windows installation and the other is for the new installation, but I can't be positive of that. I doubt if this duplication is causing you any problems per se; I mention it ...


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You need to change your boot priority so grub takes president over the Windows bootloader. In your UEFI go to Boot and look for something similar to Boot Option Priorities and set Boot Option #1 to ubuntu (P#: drive name). This should set grub as your default boot device. It is also worth noting that devices such as ubuntu (size) and Windows Boot Manager (P# ...


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Follow the steps to mount lvm partitions: In live session, open a terminal Press Ctrl+Alt+T and run: sudo fdisk -l This lists out the partition table of the system and it looked something like this: Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1* 1 4864 39070048+ 83 Linux /dev/sda2 4865 6691 14675377+ 83 LVM2_member ... The next step was to ...


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This distribution of your disk is telling you that the root dir (/) is on a partition and the home directories (/home) are on other one, separated from the first. So if the root directory is full, won't use the home directories because they're different partitions. So, I recommend to clean up, for example, old installed packages. apt always stores the ...


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you could try this: boot from a ubuntu installation live usb and then run boot-repair again and use this custom repair and it might work fine this way.


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Boot-Repair allows to easily do the EFI renaming via the "Rename Windows EFI files" option, but that option is not enabled by default because it's a dirty hack and it is not reliable in all situations. Instead, it is safer to change the UEFI boot order, when possible, or have bcd call grub, which is what Boot-Repair suggests (see the 4 last lines of your ...


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Nothing will show up as you type your password, this is an intentional security feature! Make sure you type the password correctly, remember that Ubuntu is case-sensitive!


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Installing windows (or upgrading it) alongside linux can be problematic. Try this: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair I used it to fix a problem after I installed the Windows 10 tech preview, and it worked. Basically, what it does is reinstall grub to work with all currently installed operating systems. Make sure to tell it to install grub to ...


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You have LVM volumes inside the LUKS container. You should let the sytem know about them. Run sudo vgscan sudo vgchange -a y and then mount /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-root /mnt/whateveryoulike


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I too had the same problem and it had to do with BIOS settings. The good news is that you do not need to worry about data loss. You can take a disk image with clonezilla: http://clonezilla.org/ go into your BIOS and delete any unused boot managers, check your disk for errors and then see if the bug happens again. If it does, clone your disk and sanitize ...


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Booting Windows 7 in EFI mode on a Mac is tricky at best. (Note UEFI is EFI 2.x, but Macs' EFIs are all 1.x versions, so Macs technically don't have UEFIs.) There's a very long thread on MacRumors about this subject: http://forums.macrumors.com/threads/win7-x64-booting-natively-via-efi-no-bios-emulation.696523/ To boil this thread down, some people have ...


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Kernel 3.13.0-59 seems to be buggy. There a number of reports, that installation of this kernel causes various problems. Probably some backport was not very good. I suggest switching to kernel 3.19 by running sudo apt-get install linux-generic-lts-vivid


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Yes if your having trouble usually doing , sudo sh ~/Downloads/crouton -n trusty -u and/or u can powerwash your Chromebook and reinstall again


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In order to boot from a CD or USB, it is usually necessary to change the boot device priority in your BIOS. To do so, reboot the computer and, as soon as it turns on again but before the OS starts loading, hit del or F2 or whichever key your machine uses. Unfortunately, different motherboard manufacturers have different keys to enter the BIOS setup. There ...


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By reading my own question I got a new search term were I found my answer. I'm still posting this so people in my situation don't give up on their drives. You can download GParted iso file from Sourceforge (230MB) and use Rufus to "burn" it to you're USB. Follow directions here. Boot from the USB and resize the partitions with right file system.


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Run sudo fdisk -l to find swap partition (i.e. /dev/sda6) Grab UUID in /etc/crypttab or sudo blkid for /dev/sda6 (replace device with your swap) Run sudo mkswap -U UUID /dev/sda6 (replace UUID and device with your swap) Append ,offset=1024 to the end of cryptswap1 line in /etc/crypttab Add "/dev/mapper/cryptswap1 none swap sw 0 0" to /etc/fstab Run sudo ...



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