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Boot up onto the drive you used to install Ubuntu, next open the terminal, type: Sudo apt-get remove --purge Gnome Then remove the usb restart, and see if it works!


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You can download an ISO file from Ubuntu's web site, which you copy to a CD/DVD making a bootable OS and program. It will rewrite GRUB so you are able to boot from the hard disk.


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I managed to fix it by following the instructions at http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/20864-mbr-restore-windows-7-master-boot-record.html So basically, if you have this problem, download PowerISO, format a USB drive, click Create Bootable USB drive, select the Windows Recovery Disc (you can download it online), boot from USB, click command prompt, and ...


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You can start on a live ubuntu (usb disk or cd) and launch sudo update-grub and reboot (without the live inserted) If it don't work, you can force a reinstall with purge like this: sudo apt-get install --reinstall grub-pc grub-common


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To anyone else who finds this - I eventually found a solution via this post on the ubuntu forums. From the live cd: Use the efibootmgr to set ubuntu to boot like windows. sudo efibootmgr -c -L "Windows Boot Manager" -l "\EFI\ubuntu\shimx64.efi" From live installer mount the efi partition on hard drive, lines with # are comments only: #Mount efi ...


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Ok I finally found a solution: Since the /home, /usr/share and the rest are on differnt partitions needed to mount everything correctly: sudo mount /dev/sdb2 /mnt sudo mount /dev/sda4 /mnt/usr/share sudo mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/home for i in /dev /dev/pts /proc /sys /run ; do sudo mount -B $i /mnt$i ; done sudo mount -o bind /etc/resolv.conf ...


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First you should check if booting the system as MBR/BIOS instead UEFI is really what you intended. The following is a quote from Is it still possible to install Ubuntu to an external harddrive with UEFI? which is about several ways of setting up bootloaders and necessary partitions. Refer to the original answer if some of the instructions are unclear (it ...


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Download it again via bittorrent. It's a better way. For many years, I always download Linux distros using bittorrent and always check the checksums. I can't remember any mismatch.


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NOT an acceptable solution, but just a workaround for those in a similar situation, needing to get the server started at least temporarily: grub> set root=(hd0,1) linux /vmlinuz root=/dev/xvda1 ro initrd /initrd.img boot NOTE: after booting, update-grub seems to run fine, but a reboot lands into the same helplessly stuck grub> prompt... Same ...


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Upgrading from 13.04 to 13.10 isn't supported natively, due to the way that unsupported releases are strung together. Ideally, you should do-release-upgrade from the current version to the latest version, as each step will (in theory) do upgrade steps needed. The other alternative is to do a fresh install using a currently supported release, and restore ...


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I did some reading and found that this issue was more common than I thought. Even though it may not be optimal, I just ended up switching my comp to boot in CMS (or legacy/bios/whatever) and reinstalled the disc in that mode. It works fine now. Thank you two for your help.


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galgalesh's instructions worked for me. A couple of points to add. In gparted I selected each of the drives /dev/mapper /dev/sda and /dev/sdb (not sdc as this is the live usb I believe) and then did step 3 create partition table. Once I had done this i tried to reinstall but it failed. However I rebooted and tried the reinstall and it worked OK. I was ...


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If you just want a clean install, I would recommend booting from a live cd and removing all partitions, effectively wiping your entire hard drive. Then try the Installation again. Remember that ppa's for Ubuntu do not necessarily work with Mint. I don't know if boot-repair is supported on Mint. How to delete partitions using gparted Start gparted from a ...



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