Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Insert the Ubuntu disc, or connect the Ubuntu liveUSB. Setup the BIOS to make it boot on the Ubuntu disc Reboot the PC When asked, choose Try Ubuntu Connect internet Open a terminal, and type (or copy-paste) the following command: sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair && sudo apt-get update Press Enter, then type the following ...


3

I have Xubuntu 13.10 running on my Vaio Pro. I ran boot-repair from the LiveCD and managed to get the grub menu, though Xubuntu wouldn't boot. After some research, I discovered this page: http://www.nicksplace.com.au/2013/07/04/fedora-19-on-vaio-pro-13-ssd-issues/ Its no secret that the Vaio Pro comes with a very nice SSD. The 128GB version is a ...


3

ntfs-3g has an option to deal with this kind of situation: remove_hiberfile (see man page). The man page goes on to warn about the consequences of using that option. Please note, means that the saved Windows session will be completely lost. Use this option under your own responsibility. If those are acceptable for you, you can try to mount your ...


2

use easy.bcd in windows.download easy bcd from Internet run it on your windows now from the side bar select add new entry then go to Linux in upper tabs select grub 2 write name Ubuntu and select add it's done. now whenever you boot from next time you will see two options name windows8 and ubuntu select that one in which you want to go


2

To undo & to rename files to their original names, you just need to tick the "Restore EFI backups" option of Boot-Repair. I also suggest a full backup of your efi partition. It looks like boot repair ran its "buggy" UEFI rename function. I am not sure it is always required, but it is for those UEFI that internally hard code UEFI to only boot the ...


2

I believe you can email rt@ubuntu.com and ask them to remove the post, but don't expect a quick removal. rt@ is the alias for their internal ticket handler (Request Tracker).1 1Source: Answer to the question Can I get an @ubuntu.com email address for the Ubuntu-related event I'm organising? by Oli


2

SONY VAIO’s UEFI firmware seems to kick only “EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi” however you put other efi files into EFI partition(ex: by using BootRepair). Other efi binaries are never called. You need to replace the binary “EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi” with refind boot manager. Please see also: http://www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/27418512


2

Fixed it, using boot-repair, I added the kernel option rootdelay=90. Now the linux-kernel-3.5.0-34-generic-image. But after much research and testing, I have decided to go with the linux-generic image boots properly. which is kernel version 3.2.0-48. It's the only one that boots up correctly without having to add any kernel options. Also using this kernel ...


2

Installing Grub manually is fairly simple, and once you get it, there shouldn't be anything keeping you from dual-booting successfully. First, boot the computer up off of your standard Ubuntu installation disk. You should be using the same version (e.g. 13.04) and the same architechture (e.g. amd64, 64-Bit) as your currently installed Ubuntu. If you need ...


2

I had this same problem with my HP Pavilion g6 when trying to dual boot Ubuntu 12.04.3 LTS and Windows 8. That is, even after "successfully" running Boot-Repair, I still had the notebook booting directly into Windows 8. If I pressed F9 before the HP symbol showed up, I was able to get into a Boot Menu (HP's menu? I don't know...) and from there, to select ...


2

Ordinarily, running Boot Repair backs up Microsoft's original boot loader file (bootmgfw.efi) as bootmgfw.efi.bkp and replaces the original bootmgfw.efi file with a copy of GRUB (or shim), and the Boot Repair output you posted would show this; however, I don't see such a backup file. Thus, I recommend you do one of three things: Run Boot Repair again, but ...


2

Trying to summarize what you did, what you issue is, and what you intend to achieve: this is a Wubi installation on Windows booting from /sda4 NTFS Partition /sda4 contain HP-Tools, partition /sda3 contain Windows recovery NTFS Partition /sda1 was overwritten in the attempt to add a swap partition NTFS Partition /sda2 may contain Windows system files ...


2

If your are using an older version of the ubuntu live cd, you might need to change the package source. (I had this problem with the Natty (11.04) live cd.) Start Synaptic, and in the menu go to Settings -> Repositories. Go to the "Other Software" tab, and select the line http://ppa.launchpad.net/yannubuntu/boot-repair/u... main and then click on the Edit ...


2

Thanks a lot sergey! :) Managed to work it out. Seems like I have already mounted it yesterday by blindly following a similar situation on a certain forum. Just wasn't sure on what to place after "/dev". Again, thanks a lot for your help. :D To those who might encounter the same issue (and a complete newbie like me), here are the steps to take: Use a live ...


2

The problem Grub, Ubuntu's bootloader, was installed on the flash drive, and not on your internal hard drive, as it should have been. Solution Boot with the flash drive plugged in. Remove it once Ubuntu is booted up. Run the following commands from a Terminal: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y ...


1

Fix Windows via a Windows disk: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RestoreUbuntu/XP/Vista/7Bootloader , until you get direct access to Windows. then use Boot-Repair to recover the GRUB menu


1

Running the boot-repair tool does more than fix grub. It looks like it busted your windows boot config. If you run the "startup repair" program that is on your windows 7 install disk, that should fix your Windows boot, but will probably again overwrite grub. To fix this, try following the following steps: Boot from the live CD. Open up a terminal and find ...


1

I had the same problem and I fixed it by standing on the Windows 7 loader drive and press E to edit. My insmod was set to ldm and the set root was set to /ldm/(lotofhexnumbers)/volume1. So I edit these two lines and press Ctrl+X this will boot but will not save this is just for testing. insmod part_msdos set root='(hd0,msdos1)' If it works for you, ...


1

You could always download and use Resc-a-tux. This is a live cd with a primary goal: Restoring grub/installing grub. It's a nice program which I used after windows just removed my grub without asking, and it worked like a charm. Rescatux features: Fixes GRUB and GRUB2 Regenerates Debian/Ubuntu grub menues Check and fix filesystems ...


1

Boot-Repair is a great easy to use tool that also has a live disc so you can boot from it and repair boot related issues, it can be found at the link below. Boot-Repair Live Disc Resources Boot-Repair - Ubuntu docs


1

Check your /boot/efi directory tree. Assuming your ESP is mounted there, you should have a file called /boot/efi/EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi. (Note that the case can vary after /boot/efi, since that's a FAT filesystem, which is case-insensitive.) If that file is missing, try widening the search on /boot/efi; typing find /boot/efi -iname "*.efi". This ...


1

Use a Windows Recovery disk this way: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RestoreUbuntu/XP/Vista/7Bootloader , until you get direct access to Windows. Then run Boot-Repair to recover the GRUB menu.


1

Try it with Super GRUB 2 disk. You can download it from here Then install it in a usb using Unetbootin Now you could restart your system and make sure it is set in the boot option menu.


1

From your booted Ubuntu install, run sudo grub-install /dev/sda. While it's possible that you also have a buggy BIOS and need a separate /boot partition that is not what is causing the problem here (if that were the problem, you would still get a grub rescue shell rather than just a blinking cursor) and therefore I would recommend not creating a separate ...


1

On my machine /bin/sh is a symlink to dash. All you need is to restore the symlink. While booted from the LiveCD, mount the root partition somewhere (say, /media/disk), then cd /media/disk/bin sudo rm ./sh sudo ln -s dash ./sh Something like that. Update: Regarding "mount the root partition somewhere" - if you booted from a LiveCD and have a full GUI, ...


1

If you 'just formatted' your PC, then several different things may have occurred: If you formatted just the Windows partition, then Ubuntu will be unaffected. If you re-formatted the whole drive, it may be very difficult to restore the old partitions (to as they were). If you used a Windows-based tool to re-format the drive, you would likely need a ...


1

You are affected by this bug: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/grub2/+bug/1091477 Solution: via Gparted, create another EFI partition (FAT32, 200MB, located inside the first 100GB of the disk) move the 'boot' flag on it make Ubuntu use this new ESP (eg via Boot-Repair --> Recommended Repair).


1

So! I gave up on the whole thing and after buying a new external drive and backup the data, went to install Windows again fresh (still need to dual boot). Windows STILL couldn't pick up the drive. That's when I got suspicious. I went into gparted Deleted the mount that I'd attempted to create in Windows RE sized the drive back to what it was before. ...


1

I'm getting 2 Windows boot options: "on dev/sda1" and "on dev/sda2". What does this mean? Don't worry, what you observe is normal and common. These 2 Windows entries in the GRUB menu both boot Windows the same way. I can tell you how to remove/hide one entry if you indicate the URL provided by Boot-Repair. What implications does this have for my ...


1

Ok, got back into my system and it is running. To help others, here is the simple fix: All I had to do is boot into an older kernel! :) (here is an explanation on how to do it http://askubuntu.com/questions/97731...keeps-crashing ) Note though, that I had to go back to a kernel as low as 2.6.x. I won't reinstall for now - there are too many issues ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible