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TL;DR. Try all your USB ports including all USB ports on your docking station if you have one. I just experienced the same thing with a new installation of Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS and a following dist-upgrade now running the following: Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS (lsb_release -a) 3.16.0-33-generic (uname -r) grub-install (GRUB) 2.02~beta2-9ubuntu1 (grub-install ...


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So if I understand, now on your disk drive you got the windows partition but can't boot into it. Boot into ubuntu live CD and download boot-repair https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair It have fixed that problem for me once.


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Check your BIOS, maybe it is set like that (Timer) or Wake-On-LAN or something of that sort. Just reset BIOS Settings and Done!


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Second Edit: Here is the Microsoft Technet article that explains the problem. About the two figures: The F2 key reports what size motherboard BIOS sees for the physically installed memory in the computer; The second number that you see (in "Detail" and the result of lshw) is the actual size of RAM that the loaded operating system (OS) can use for running ...


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If you can't really access the BIOS in any way, you can (always for IDE drives and almost always for SATA drives) force the boot priority by rearranging the drives connections to the motherboard: This will only work if both your hard disk drive and your CD/DVD-ROM drive use an IDE or SATA interface. Unplug the power cord from the power supply unit Open ...


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Short answer: Use BIOS boot menu. If not available, then remove the hard drive and clean it in some other computer. Detailed answer: Most, if not all, BIOSes has something like boot menu. Such menu allows to arbitrarily choose boot device regardless of boot device order that is set in BIOS. To access the boot menu just tap the proper button during the ...


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If you have Windows 8.1 installation disk, you can try this: Insert Windows 8.1 disk and restart computer. Let the disk open the installation window where you have to select language to install, time and keyboard. After selected the language, press Next. Press Repair your computer. Press Troubleshoot -> Advanced Options -> Command Prompt. The console will ...


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Warning Choosing the wrong solution below will render your system inoperable If you're running Windows XP: `bootsect /nt52 SYS` If you're running Windows Vista, 7 or 8.0 or 8.1 in BIOS mode: `bootsect /nt60 SYS` If you're running Windows 7 or 8.0 / 8.1 in UEFI mode: Boot any LiveDVD with gparted (Ubuntu LiveDVD will be fine) Set the boot flag to ...


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Yes it maybe harmful in both cases whether booting windows with Ubuntu hibernated or booting ubuntu with windows hibernated. Ubuntu is not able to mount windows partitions when windows is hibernated, if you force mounting windows partitions ,it may cause harm. check these links for more info. ...


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Warning this is for a system running Windows 8.1 in BIOS mode, this is NOT for a system running on UEFI From windows, run the bootrec cmds: bootrec /RebuildBcd bootrec /fixMbr bootrec /fixboot bootsect /nt60 SYS as mentioned in http://www.thewindowsclub.com/repair-master-boot-record-mbr-windows


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When you install an OS in EFI mode, it alters the NVRAM settings on the computer to point to the new OS's boot loader. Normally this works fine. My suspicion is that in your case, this change has affected the way the computer reacts to keypresses during startup or has otherwise affected startup options. If I'm right, this is a firmware bug. Some possible ...


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This problem might be caused by the fact that one has acpi=off option in your grub. To fix it: change the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT variable value from quiet splash acpi=off to quiet splash reboot=bios in your /etc/default/grub file then please do sudo update-grub Now you will be able to enter bios However to make Ubuntu bootable again after you've ...


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No, you cannot. BIOS (Basic Input Output System) is only active while the computer boots up. After that the Operating System takes over. BIOS is on a seperate chip and you cannot change it from within the OS.


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You wrote: It looks like the bootmanager should "boot to the BIOS settings" or something like that, but... HOW? If you're saying that GRUB has a menu entry with that label, try using it. Many EFI boot managers (I think including GRUB) now offer such an option. The option doesn't work on all EFIs, though, so it's conceivable that GRUB has such an option ...


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If you are using systemd the command that will rectify your problem is timedatectl set-local-rtc 1 This will set the accessing/storing of time in local time If you are using upstart, edit /etc/default/rc5 by adding/changing this line: UTC=no


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Run boot-repair on a live cd/usb: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair If you have not installed ubuntu yet, ubuntu will install eveything that is needed for dual boot when you do that.


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For Older Dell Machines I have an old Dell desktop (Dimension E520 circa 2006) running Ubuntu. To update the BIOS I downloaded the required .exe from Dell. Then I tried to run it using the following: Using a USB drive with FreeDos. The machine wouldn't boot into FreeDos and it gave a Device not ready error. SystemRescueCD - same problem as 1) above. Used ...



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