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F2 key method Turn the computer on. If you see an invitation to press the F2 key to enter Setup, do so. The Setup (BIOS) screen will appear. If this method does not work, repeat it, but hold F2. F12 key method Turn the computer on. If you see an invitation to press the F12 key, do so. Boot options will appear along with the ability to enter Setup. Using ...


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Ubuntu 15.04 and later uses systemd as the default init system and includes the timedatectl program. Running timedatectl will output: Local time: Tue 2016-02-02 09:47:54 MST Universal time: Tue 2016-02-02 16:47:54 UTC RTC time: Tue 2016-02-02 16:47:54 Time zone: America/Denver (MST, -0700) Network time on: yes NTP synchronized: no ...


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sudo hwclock --debug Gives you the unmodified time before spitting out the interpreted (local or UTC) answer.


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So it turns out that I wasn't using Unetbootin which meant I wasn't making proper USB bootable drives for use by a UEFI BIOS. If you run into this issue, use Unetbootin to get the most stable live version (14.04 right meow) and plop it on a thumb drive. When you boot up the machine make sure it is in UEFI, No secure boot mode. Then in setup (F2) go to ...


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So this is a short guide, since I just got it working :) Intel rapid start makes the laptop go into deep sleep after X(defined in bios) mins/hours. It will save you some battery life, if you leave your laptop in sleep for a long time. Read about it here: https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/what-is-intel-rapid-start-technology Make sure your laptop ...


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Some of the other answers here are helpful, but I think you need to back up and read up on the differences between BIOS and EFI. These are two different types of firmware, BIOS being the old type (dominant before 2011) and EFI being the newer variety (shipping on most computers introduced since mid-2011, and some before then). EFI is not BIOS. You presumably ...


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I am assuming here that with GBR you actually meant GPT. Did you created a UEFI compatible Windows USB stick? Like using tools e.g. Rufus which gives an option to make UEFI with GPT partition compatible USB drive. My guess is you created a simple MBR bootable PD which then complained that it can't install windows on GPT partitions. Both Windows and Ubuntu ...


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Your approach is misguided. If you have to install and use Windows 7 on a Windows 10 machine in legacy boot, then do it and live with its limitations. One of them is that you can't add "BIOS menu entries" for individual operating systems, you only get this functionality with UEFI booting. Reinstalling GRUB in MBR already has a perfectly answered question: ...


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Boot your newly installed Ubuntu. Run GParted. Write down on paper or into a text file, the numbers of the partitions Windows 7 and Ubuntu, respectively, are residing on. The directery /etc/grub.d/ contains the script files for the boot process. You have to make new script files for the Windows 7 and the old Ubuntu, respectively. Make new script files in ...



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