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Read man od. od will let you specify any format you like. For instance, if your file is 4byte integers, you'd use od --format=dI. It depends on what type of variables the "up to 12 parameters" are, and how much space (how many bytes) they take up in the file, and the "endian-ness" of the data (is a 4 byte integer stored as 4321 or 1234 in the file?). If ...


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I assume you have accidentaly deleted the /usr/bin/file binary. You could actually reinstall file using sudo apt-get install --reinstall file though this would download the entire package rather than the binary itself, this is the cleanest easiest way to get back the binary.


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$ dpkg -S /usr/bin/file file: /usr/bin/file So the package which provides the /usr/bin/file executable file is file.Install file by running, sudo apt-get install file


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The best way to do this is to use the type shell builtin as @FlorianDiesch suggested. The which command can also do it but, among various other problems, it does not deal gracefully with aliases or shell functions. The shell builtin type (which is available on bash,sh,dash,fish,zsh, ksh and probably others), does not have these problems: $ type file file ...


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It's located in /usr/bin/file. The command below will locate things for you. You can replace file with whatever. which file Checking for specific stuff in /usr/bin will show you it's there... cd /usr/bin; ls -l | grep "file"


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In most shells, including bash, you can use the type command to find the location of a command: $ type file file is /usr/bin/file


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You can use which command to locate a command: which file See man which for more info.



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