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Just as a complement to @souravc answer... For the "User level Change", instead of editing the ~/.bashrc file you can simply create the directory $HOME/bin/ and place your scripts in there. The directory will be automatically added to the PATH (at least since Ubuntu 12.04) which means that you'll be able to run all the scripts/executables inside that ...


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Try this: echo $TERM This is more authoritative, but could be messed up by your programs. However on mine, it says xterm and on ttys it says linux, which I think stands for Linux Console.


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The file was getting sourced, but execution was stopped when it reached this case statement, which will only continue if it is being sourced in a shell in interactive mode. case $- in *i*) ;; *) return;; esac The variable $- represents the flags with which the current shell was initialized. If it doesn't see i (the flag for interactive mode), ...


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Use gedit ~/.bashrc, it will allow you to modify ~/.bashrc using gedit.


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Programs started from the Ubuntu launcher do not read .bashrc. As an alternative to setting the paths in PyCharm, you can simply start PyCharm from a Bash shell to give it access to the environment variables you set in .bashrc.


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Actually this is a great question for Unix & Linux because it is not only related to Ubuntu. There is a really nice answer on SuperUser which describes the Difference between .bashrc, .bash_profile and .profile. The accepted answer explains this pretty well. Here are some relevant parts from that answer: Bash is a Bourne-like shell. It reads ...


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Not really sure why it would produce that specific message but you certainly don't want that command in your .bashrc. It is a very bad idea, for various reasons: .bashrc is read each time you open a terminal. Do you really want a second terminal to launch each time you open one? Why would you want to mount all drives each time you open a terminal or start ...


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If you delete a user's .bashrc and they put work into it, they will get really mad at you!!! Just back it up / move it aside by using mv ~user/.bashrc ~user/.bashrc.orig The "what will happen" has been addressed in other questions, the user will still be able to log in, using the system default profile, assuming you're in Ubuntu that's covered here: Restore ...


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If you delete a user's ~/.bashrc nothing special happens. Bash will still start and use the system-wide /etc/bash.bashrc. Just like any user root may or may not have a ~/.bashrc, and if it exists you can delete if you have write permission on /root/.


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You cant remove root user .bashrc file unless you are root user. In case if .bashrc file deleted for your account then you can restore it with cp /etc/skel/.bashrc ~/.bashrc But this is not your old .bashrc file. It's a new .bashrc file with default configuration. Update: Curiosity and over Curiosity There is no problem as menioned in above answer ...


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To understand the eval snippet eval "$(SHELL=/bin/sh lesspipe)", we need to break it down: At first let's check what SHELL=/bin/sh lesspipe returns: $ SHELL=/bin/sh lesspipe export LESSOPEN="| /usr/bin/lesspipe %s"; export LESSCLOSE="/usr/bin/lesspipe %s %s"; As you can see it returns two commands containing variable declarations preceded by export to ...



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