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1

Paraview is available in the repositories of all currently supported Ubuntu versions, so regardless of which one you are running, you can install it by opening a terminal and typing sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install paraview Then you can launch from a terminal by typing paraview or by pressing alt+F2 and typing paraview or by searching ...


0

Use the cp terminal program running as root to copy the executable file of your C program to /usr/local/bin which is the place to put user-created systemwide executable files intended for use on a local system. The path of the executable file that you copied to /usr/local/bin will be something like /usr/local/bin/my-program. Make my-program executable from ...


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The problem in your approach is that you use exec. $ help exec exec: exec [-cl] [-a name] [command [arguments ...]] [redirection ...] Replace the shell with the given command. Execute COMMAND, replacing this shell with the specified program. ARGUMENTS become the arguments to COMMAND. If COMMAND is not specified, any redirections take ...


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You can always switch to default provide via gnome-terminal --window-with-profile=Default command ( unless you deleted that profile , of course ).


2

This is not a full-fledged answer. I would post a comment but this is too wordy to fit. In a comment, you mentioned you put echos into your .bashrc to figure out where the problem was. If I understand correctly, you had something like this: echo 1 if [ -f ~/.bash_aliases ]; then . ~/.bash_aliases fi echo 2 And for the output, you got 1 $: command ...


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Adding to the answer of Mitch (the accepted answer above), check your /usr/lib/jvm/ directory. Usually, java is installed there itself. You might have oracle java installed or you might have a latest version of java installed. Just checkout the directories at /usr/lib/jvm/ and add the one your java is in. For me, it was: /usr/lib/jvm/java-8-oracle So, ...


2

You do not have /usr/bin in your path. To run sudo you have to type the whole path for sudo /usr/bin/sudo nano .bashrc If /bin is also not in your path you will specify the full path for nano like this /usr/bin/sudo /bin/nano .bashrc And finally you might also need to provide the path for .bashrc /usr/bin/sudo /bin/nano ~/.bashrc or /usr/bin/sudo /...



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