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For me, this is logical: the $PATH is searched from the beginning to the end and the first matching executable will be run. See the following Q&A's on the same topic: Order of files to be executed in linux and how to change it How to correctly add a path to PATH? How does unix search for executable files? So, first found, first used!


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SIGTERM sends a signal to the command and will tell the command to stop itself. If there is a need to clean-up files due to the kill the command can do that. SIGKILL sends a signal to the init system. The command itself does not get even told it is going to get killed. So you can use both; but SIGTERM should be preferred (it is more graceful). Will ...


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You don't even have to use SIGTERM. tail listens for SIGINT and SIGQUIT too. I'm not sure if there's any difference between signals (it's all specific to tail) but any of these would be better than SIGKILL. It's quite easy to test too: $ tail -f /dev/null > /dev/null & [1] 26599 $ kill -SIGINT $! [1]+ Interrupt tail -f /dev/null > ...


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best I could find on my own (and I'm a newbie) was just running 'apt-get check' for a clue as to how things turned out following an install. Also running 'script' prior to running an 'apt-get install' will capture all the output from the command to file so that you don't have to worry about it scrolling away.


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Most commands that output data on stdout, (which includes grep and sed,) buffer their output when it's not going to a terminal. That is, they wait for a large chunk of output to gather (like 4KiB) before flushing the chunk to the file or pipe. This is generally more efficient. Some commands allow you to override this, like GNU grep which has a ...



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