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3

No, you cannot do this with gedit. This was a declined feature request. It can apparently be done with a plugin, but such a plugin is not published - not that I can find, anyway,


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Sure but they're different approaches to roughly the same thing. Clonezilla (et al) involves taking a complete bootloader-through-application image. It's big and there's no de-duplication (if you have 50 instances of a similar stack). You also store a load of stuff that is easily replaceable. Docker installs on stock Ubuntu (installable from a CD). Each ...


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When using the Clonezilla disk-to-disk option, you will first be prompted for a source drive, then the target drive. The target drive will be overwritten and all information on it will be lost. This is in contrast to the other option, disk-to-image, where you are first asked to select a target device which the image will be saved at. Then, at the end, you ...


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I had a very similar error, but I wasn't using pv or anything else in a pipe between tar and the tape device. The blocking factor bit is the key, though. I'd read that for best results, you should use a larger block size than the default, so i had used blocking factor 512 on the tar command line: tar -b 512 -cf /dev/tape files Unfortunately, tar ...


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You can use Clonezilla Live: Two types of Clonezilla are available, Clonezilla live and Clonezilla SE (server edition). Clonezilla live is suitable for single machine backup and restore OR Systemback Tool The Systemback tool allows you to create restore points, backups, and live images of a running system. Currently, it only works for Ubuntu ...


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Duplicati An open source, gratis backup application running on Linux, with gui that "securely stores encrypted, incremental, compressed backups on cloud storage services and remote file servers. It works with Amazon S3, Windows Live SkyDrive, Google Drive (Google Docs), Rackspace Cloud Files or WebDAV, SSH, FTP (and many more)". Version 1.0 is considered ...


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The reason the script runs when being executed from the shell but not as a cronjob is usually the different env it finds there. So change your cronjob to save the env in e.g. /tmp/env by using env | sort> /tmp/env and when /tmp/env arrives diff it with your current env. env | sort | diff - /tmp/env HTH


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The error you're having is often due to a lack of permissions on one end or the other, as you're doing a sudo rsync on the sending end, that discounts this option, so it must be on the receiving end. Currently, you're sunning a sudo rsync on the sending end, but running a non-sudo version on the receiver, even though you are doing it with a sudo user. To ...


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If you're using the stock backup app then you can set its destination location most backup apps let you set the location actually


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Change the perl entry to path/to/perl. Often times, commands such as perl and python are actually environment based things and are found in your PATH. As cron lacks that PATH, it's best to use absolute paths in crontab.


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Here is one solution that seems to work and is (relatively) straightforward and (largely) GUI-based: Install GRSYNC from the Ubuntu apps directory (or through apt-get install). Install "Scheduled Tasks" / Gnome-Schedule using CLI / terminal: sudo apt-get install gnome-schedule Mount your NAS / external hard drive so that Linux recognizes it as if it was ...


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From your description, you might want to take a good look at BTSync. This is a p2p syncing application but it uses only self-hosted storage. On Linux, it relies on a config file and web interface but should still be easier to get going than unison. Advantages over unison: easy setup strong support for all OSes Mobile clients (access your files like a ...


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Mount the drive from the live-usb session, do chroot /mnt (assuming the drive is mounted at /mnt), followed by the first three lines from this answer (as if the drive were bootable). Depending on the exact directory structure on that drive, you may need to replace ~/ with some directory that you know exists.


2

This is a XY Problem. You don't actually need to back up the whole system, as if you're not happy with the new kernel you can always boot your machine to the older one via GRUB. You won't even need to uninstall the new kernel! But if you really want to backup your system there are programs like DéjàDup to do so. You can find it in Ubuntu through the Dash, ...


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I was able to clone to a smaller drive by the following steps: Before doing this I prepared the destination disk by creating a replica of the source partition table on the destination disk as described by Malte Skoruppa here. (essentially you make the same size partitions on the destination drive before cloning). I used Gparted for this. The method of ...


2

Just dd the section of the disk that goes from the start of the disk to the end of the last partition. In your case the last partition is /dev/sdb3, so: Find /dev/sdb3's end using sudo fdisk -l /dev/sdb (End column); dd the section of the drive that goes from the start of the disk to the end of /dev/sdb3 (let's assume that the end of /dev/sdb3 is on byte ...



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