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You're missing some dependencies. Please install them with sudo apt-get install python3-dbus python3-dbus.mainloop.qt Using sudo backintime causes some troubles because of wrong $HOME. Please use either sudo -i backintime for command-line or gksudo backintime-gnome for the old Gnome GUI or pkexec backintime-qt4 for the new Qt4 GUI instead. Disclaimer: ...


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I would combine parts 1 and 2. MySql allows you to take encrypted backups as detailed here: mysqlbackup --backup-image=/backups/image.enc --encrypt --key-file=/meb/key --backup-dir=/var/tmp/backup backup-to-image The next bit would be to push the image up to a cloud service. This comes down to personal preference. If you like Dropbox, it has a ...


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This single command should do the job, so it can simply be entered into your crontab: find /opt/abc/* -maxdepth 0 -mtime +2 ! -name '*.tar.gz' -exec tar czf {}.tar.gz {} \; -exec rm -rf {} \; I haven't tested it that thoroughly, but I am sure it won't accidentally delete stuff. It will, however, delete archives, if they have the same name as a directory ...


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find /path/to/directory -mtime +2 -exec ls "{}" \; Is a useful snippet to list files over 2 days old, though it only counts full days, and there's an element of rounding that happens there, so using minutes with the -mmin option may work better. I've also seen people relpace the -exec with print0 and pipe the output to xargs, handles unusual filenames ...


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You can use xargs -n 1 to only pipe a single file argument into the compress command. Be careful about spaces.


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The default steam libary is in ~/.local/share/Steam. I'm not sure if it's possible to change but if you changed it you would know where it is.


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BackInTime version < 1.1.0 You have to deactivate Auto Host / User / Profile ID and change the value for Host to match your old systems hostname. After that all snapshots should be shown in the main window. BackInTime version >= 1.1.0 On first start BackInTime will ask if you would like to restore your old config. Maybe connect your external drive and ...


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As Mirto already pointed out this was a bug in versions <= 1.0.26 To fix this manually you can run sudo sed -e 's/\(self.list_files_view_model.removeColumns( 3, 2 )\)/#\1/g' -i /usr/share/backintime/kde4/app.py Disclaimer: I'm member of BIT-Dev Team


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Change the ownership of CUSTOMERS parent folder to root and remove write permissions for other users. This way no one can rename the folder by accident anymore. sudo chown root:root /path/to/parent sudo chmod 755 /path/to/parent


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Since the unfortunate withdrawal of the Remastersys developer, the web site http://www.remastersys.com now seems to have disappeared permanently, so it's not obvious how to get and use this excellent application. Below is what I did to get a copy of Remastersys 3.0.4 running on Ubuntu 14.04. Note that the application development ended before U 14.04 so it ...


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Create some scripts sudo nano /usr/local/bin/rsync_html #!/bin/bash /usr/bin/rsync -av --delete /var/www/html /media/stan/Seagate\ Expansion\ Drive/backups/ sudo nano /usr/local/bin/rsync_documents #!/bin/bash /usr/bin/rsync -av --delete /home/stan/documents /media/stan/Seagate\ Expansion\ Drive/backups/ sudo nano /usr/local/bin/rsync_backups ...


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Absolutely you can. In addition to other solution, I'll add steps to do that quoted from DejaDup wiki. Open Déjà Dup. Choose “Applications → Accessories → Déjà Dup Backup Tool”. Click on the big “Restore” button. A dialog will appear asking where your backup files are stored (your “Backup location”). Choose it from the dropdown or choose “Other…”. On this ...


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Yes and yes. Deja Dup is a file-based backup utility, which is actually a front-end to Duplicity, and can restore those files to any drive or operating system independent of things like filesystem type or partition size. You can use it to back up only certain folders, or to back up all the files and directories in a filesystem. What it won't back up is ...


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You can back up your personal files to an external disk with normal file-copying commands (cp in a Terminal or drag-and-drop with whatever file manager you like). That's normally adequate, unless you do heavy customization of system-wide settings (in /etc). In a worst-case scenario, you'd re-install Ubuntu and then copy your personal files back. Clonezilla ...


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I am not really sure what you mean by "just bootup a portable linux drive". If what you want is: hard-copy your sda2 into a usb and then eventually boot from it, it is probably possible. What you can surely do is: dd your sda2 to a key (be careful with the dd command and see here) If you want to restore: dd it back to an appropriate sized partition Boot ...


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After running some test and actually using it, here's the command for rsync that I am happy with: rsync -aAXv –exclude={“/dev/*”,”/proc/*”,”/sys/*”,”/tmp/*”,”/run/*”,”/mnt/*”,”/media/*”,”/lost+found”, “/boot/*”} /media/sda1/* /media/sdb1/ –delete -u --dry-run If I am satisfied, I remove --dry-run to make the changes.


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I fixed this error by simply making a metadata file in .cache/deja-dup i.e., from the home directory issue the terminal command touch .cache/deja-dup/metadata dejadup-preferences is still throwing CRITICAL errors but probably unrelated to this


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If you have installed the package from source file you need to manually remove all the files inserted into the system by the package. For future reference i would suggest you to install packages from official repositories. If for some reason you need to install from source always use checkinstall instead of make install. make install simply copies file ...


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First date has a format of YYYYMMDD, which is how I name my backups. Second example is week number (%U) with leading zero like you asked. Oops, gotta escape those backquotes. #!/bin/bash # Do 'man strftime' for more date format options. mydate=`date +"%Y%m%d"` basedir=/home/username/backups zipfile=$basedir/backup-$mydate.zip echo File name is $zipfile # ...


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Have you tried snapper? sudo apt-get snapper manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/trusty/man8/snapper.8.html I haven't tried it but it looks promising


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Try this script: #!/bin/sh Case (find) in name="true" name="(name.zip)" find . -name '*.txt' -ctime +7 'name=("name of the file")' -exec zip "archive-$("date+%Y-%U").zip" {} \; endl and it might work fine this way.


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This should be enough for your case: find . -name '*.txt' -ctime +7 | zip archive-$(date +%Y%U).zip -@ example: find . -name '*.txt' -ctime +7 | zip archive-$(date +%Y%U).zip -@ output: adding: a.txt (stored 0%) adding: b.txt (stored 0%) Now to make sure of naming: ls output is: archive-201525.zip a.txt b.txt c


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Every Hour? Little paranoid much? :P But yes. This provides a good resource if you want to backup files to external locations via the network or to external drives. If you meant backups of the entire disk I think hourly is probably a little much but you could probably do something similar with cron. To improve the answer for posterity in case the link goes ...


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Your second profile is missing a name. I'm not sure how this could happen because I double checked in BIT source and it should refuse to create a new profiles without name. Anyways, please run echo "profile2.name=Second Profile" | tee -a ~/.config/backintime/config to fix this. Edit BackInTime version 1.1.6 (planned to release next week) will avoid this by ...


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You're vague about this "app" you want to test, so there could be several options. One I can think of is for you to use a virtual machine to do your tests. Create a VM for 12.04 and another for 14.04. Install Ubuntu on those. Once finished, create a "snapshot" of each VM. Install your app and do your tests. When you need to "roll back" to the initial state, ...


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As among others answers to this question explain cloning in general and CloneZilla (as one of the easiest/best tools) specifically can do exactly what you want.


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Backuping your root Get the root partition device, using mount : $ mount [...] /dev/sdXY on / type ext4 (rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro,data=ordered) [...] Mount it on another directory (replace /dev/sdXY using your partition): $ sudo mkdir -p /mnt/root $ sudo mount /dev/sdXY /mnt/root Copy it to another partition, without file permission changes (in ...


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To keep list of packages installed in the old system, you can do : apt --installed list or dpkg --list and redirect it into some file in home filesystem. Then if you want to back-up some subdirectories in / directory, you can use tar with appropriate parameters. I recommend to back-up /etc. Also some logs in /var/log might be useful for future ...


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Go find where all of the extra files got restored to and delete them. The fact that you have no space points to you simply restoring the files in the wrong location and so you have duplicates everywhere. For instance, if you backed up the whole system, but restored it to your home directory, then you have a copy of /bin, /usr, etc in ~/.


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FonePaw iOS Transfer is an excellent iTunes alternative which can backup music, videos, playlists, photos, movies, TV shows, Podcasts, iTunes U, Voice memos, Audiobooks and more to PC with one click. You can use it to backup iPhone without iTunes. • Click "To Folder" to backup iPhone to computer within seconds. • Transfer music from iPhone to PC or iTunes; ...


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It is possible to do that. HOWEVER: If the drive is actually failing, then you will eventually lose everything you put on it. If it's just the boot sector that is bad, then it should work fine. Use 'Disks' inside Ubuntu to format it with an EXT4 filesystem (or something else if you like) and it will show up just like a thumb drive. You can also use this ...


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To disable it run the command: sudo gsettings set org.gnome.gedit.preferences.editor create-backup-copy false Now to clean your home from these files(files ending with ~) run this simple command: find ~ -name "*~" -delete


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You can use this --exclude parameter to ignore files and folders. For hidden files and folders (filename or folder name starts with a .) use the parameter below: --exclude "**/.*" This means, match all files and folders which starts with a . in all folders recursively. The glob ** will recursively match all files and directories * will match any number ...


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deja-dup uses is a GUI that uses duplicity as the back-end and hence there are only limited command-line options. You can run man deja-dup and see the various options available. For example to start a backup run: deja-dup --backup or to restore a file file: deja-dup --restore file (Note that these commands just invoke the GUI from terminal) To ...


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Remastersys is a tool which is able to create a LiveCD/Installation Media of your current system. It is not maintained anymore, but it still works for 14.04 sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mutse-young/remastersys sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install remastersys-gtk


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I have found a good rSync line for the most part using various posts from around the net to come up with a good copy format. This is what I have ended up using: sudo rsync -av --exclude=/dev/* --exclude=/lost+found/* --exclude=/mnt/* --exclude=/home/ --exclude=/media/* --exclude=/bakroot/ --exclude=/proc/* --exclude=/sys/* --exclude=/tmp/* ...


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Another ready-made sync tool is Seafile. It is a one server multiple clients solution like dropbox. In the latest version there is an option to share encrypted folders in a way that the server won't know the key. See Seafile security features Hint: Seafile calls a shared folder a "Library", for better understanding of the documentation.



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