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actually, yes it is possible. do your normal rsyncscript.sh you will need to generate keys using the command ssh-keygen in your home directory, go to .ssh/id_rsa.pub and copy that into the other servers /authorized_keys file


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The two format are not compatible. If you want to re-use your exclude list from rsync you have to: use --exclude-globbing-filest on duplicity prefix each line of your rsync's exclude list file with **. You can achieve the latter with sed: sed -e 's/^/**\//' rsync_backup_exclude_file >> duplicity_backup_exclude_file


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The best option, if you can, is to set up key-based SSH authentication on the remote server, and use a key with no passphrase on the client. This will allow the SSH connection, which rsync uses when you use that [user@]server:path notation, to happen without prompting for a password. Ubuntu documentation for doing this is at: ...


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This worked for me when connecting remotely to a machine and logging in/out. Will test in a few hours at home with a full reboot, will edit with my findings I also found this which seems to do exactly the same. I have never thought about this feature before and glad you brought it up! EDIT I run Gnome 3 and wasn't able to find the setting as mentioned in ...


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Do you want to do some countdown, while screen is active? If so, you could change your if and for with while loop, like this: while (screen -list backup|grep -q backup); do # delay sleep 1 # display another dot echo -n . done This displays a dot every second until your screen session terminates. As for countdown, how would you even know ...


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Check the AptOnCD tool. It can backup and restore all of your installed packages.


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You can recover these files using testdisk: Run testdisk Select No Log Select the disk where Ubuntu is installed Select the partition table (usually Intel or GPT) Select Analyse Select Quick Search Highlight the root partition (usually Linux) Press p key Navigate to /var/cache/apt/archives Highlight the first entry (the entry that has . as name) Press c ...


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the command looks good to me. have you had it synced completely once at the beginning? if so, compare the size of the folders to check the size differences with du -sh /media/Sea01 du -sh /media/n54l/804E-B550/BU


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Ended up resetting all deja dup settings with: dconf reset -f "/org/gnome/deja-dup/"


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Attach the HDD to a Windows machine (or boot Windows) and run: chkdsk X: /f where X is the drive letter under Windows.


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Well, I did some research to find out that my conception was wrong; and I do have an answer. The Linux/Ubuntu /dev/ folder contains a list of device IO interfaces, not so much files. Here's a link to where I discovered this. So, instead of reading a file, and dumping it to a file, I was reading an output stream, and dumping it to a file. Of course, output ...


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Remember that you can easily remove your hard disk from one machine to another without any problem.


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@boywithaxe - Regarding your comments to Mitch's answer you can indeed just copy the relevant partitions by doing dd if=/dev/sdb3 of=/dev/sda3. That is actually the easiest part. The most tricky part is that you will also have to mount the newly copied partition, as well as a couple of other partitions and install grub (grub-install /dev/sda) (and add a swap ...


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Yes, you can utilize Filezilla for backing up your files. For further detail procedures, you may refer to Install WordPress on Ubuntu. There are several backup WordPress plugins available over the Internet, you can find the most suitable one for conducting this procedure.


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Just kill that leftover grub-mount process. This happened to me as well, and there was no apparent negative side-effect to the killing, because the relevant update-grub process had already abandoned it - you can easily verify that by seeing how it the leftover grub-mount process no longer has a parent.


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In issues like this one of the most helpful tools if you have access to a Windows PC is chkdsk. I think it should be used as chkdsk /f [drive_letter] to solve any problems related to MFT. NTFS drives do stuff like this very often. Or else you can use ntfsfix from an Ubuntu PC. Make sure you have installed ntfs-3g first. Then run : sudo ntfsfix ...


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What is the type of the file system you are backing files to? I guess since you are backing up on a ubuntu it is ext4. Different filesystems may have differing overhead while allocating space for files. In data storage, the smallest amount of disk space that can be allocated to hold a file is called a cluster. Most files are not the same size as the ...


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They are in ~/.darkplaces so if you back up your home folder you are good.


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Have you tried this command? sudo echo $(sudo grep $USER /etc/shadow | cut -f 2 -d ':') >/home/[yourUserNameFolder]/encrypted-pass This will copy your password to the file encrypted-pass in your home directiory, or any other that you specify. UPDATE - this will actually get the hashed password and there is no way to decrypt that sorry


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If you have the space, just tar up your test directory. If you need to revert things, delete the test files, and extract your archive to get back to what you started with. tar preserves ownership and permissions by default.


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Yes, using the stat command (See man stat, man find, man xargs), but why would it be needed? In normal Linux life, wholesale permission changes/restores are rarely needed. sudo find / \(-type f -o -type d \) -print0 | \ xargs -0 stat <stat parameters>


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After creating aliases you should run source ~/.bashrc in terminal to make the changes. Also it is mxp ALL=(root) NOPASSWD: ADMCMDS There is space between (root) and NOPASSWD & between : and ADMCMDS


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As long as you ensure you install the bootloaded (grub) on the hard disk you're installing Ubuntu on, there is absolutely no problem!) I've even installed Ubuntu on an external hard drive on my own machine and then moved that to the internal hard drive of another machine multiple times and it just works (unlike Windows)


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The dd backup was the right thing to do. First fired up GPartEd to create a partition on the external disk that was larger than the partition containing the Ubuntu installation that needed backing up. Then opened the console and ran sudo dd if=/dev/sdaX of=/dev/sdbX bs=512 conv=noerror,sync. Next I reinstalled Windows7 and shrunk the Windows partition. Then ...


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For versions up to 15.04, Aptik is a nice GUI method of backing up to a remote drive and restoring everything with a few clicks of the mouse. It's available in the PPAs.


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One simple solution is to use duplicity (on which Déjà-dup sits) and produce a list of files in the backup: duplicity list-current-files --no-encryption --time <timestring> target > list.txt where "timestring" is given, according to man duplicity, as: The acceptible time strings are intervals (like "3D64s"), w3-datetime strings, like ...


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Set up a script (like a BAT file in Windows) that issues an rsync command. The rsync command will synchronize disk 2 with disk 1 (and not the other way around). Make this script executable (with the chmod command) and test it. Open your cron file (crontab -e) and schedule your rsync script to run at every hour. You could put the rsync command in the cron ...


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Well first i would install a fresh version of windows 7. Then in Ubuntu installation you should make new partition for the Ubuntu in the /dev/sda10 and configure it I'm kinda new to Ubuntu bot hope this helps you out a bit :)


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The answer to your first question is yes, but then replacing your previous hdd with the newly installed hdd may cause severe problems. As an example consider that you installed Ubuntu in new HDD when connected externally and grub was installed in old HDD, when you remove old HDD and replace it with new HDD, it won't boot any OS because grub is missing. If ...


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Your system does not contain any restore partitions: /dev/sda1 2,048 206,847 204,800 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS /dev/sda2 * 206,848 409,806,847 409,600,000 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS /dev/sda3 409,808,894 976,771,071 566,962,178 5 Extended /dev/sda5 409,808,896 968,638,463 558,829,568 83 Linux ...


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It looks like grub-mount is trying to edit a read only file system and has hung. It should be safe to send a signal with kill to ask it to give up (send 15, and if needed after a few seconds 2, and if needed after a few seconds 1, if it's still running use -9 and report it to the maintainer) (if the pid number changes start with 15 again ) It's likely to ...


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It seems a known bug in Deja-dup: https://bugs.launchpad.net/deja-dup/+bug/1217959


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The error was overcome with the suggestion to "quote" the path so: dd if=/dev/sda | gzip - c > "/media/mark/Seagate Expansion Drive/ssd.img.gz" is currently building an archive (finally).


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You most certainly have to manually create an LVM snapshot if you want one ( using lvcreate -s ). They also are only suitable for short lived use; you can't keep creating one every day and retaining them for the long haul as a means of recovering old data, which is also not at all the same thing as a backup. If you want a backup, then you need to use a ...


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Making a copy of a drive (or whatever) is easy from terminal, less so from GUI. You can use cat or dd interchangeably for simple cases, I'll use cat here for brevity. You need to open a terminal as root (or use sudo -i) cat /dev/sda will stream your drive contents 'as is' to a pipe. > will direct that data stream to a second process or file; so if you ...



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