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You can send the backup file to the other Ubuntu using rsync or scp then you can delete the backup on your system or not Use this link for learning rsync RSync useful options: -r --> Recursive -b --> Backup -u --> Update (--inplace, --append) -d ...


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If you're shipping identical systems and don't want to run the install multiple times, go ahead and run the OEM install, finish configuring it the way you want in preparation for the initial user boot, then image the drive. For subsequent machines, instead of running the OEM install again, just write the image to the drive. To do the image ...


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I found a simple solution using systemd. With WantedBy systemd provides an easy way to run things if some other service is started. I just put the service in \lib\systemd\system\crypt-backup.service. It is activated by systemctl enable crypt-backup.service [Unit] Description=Run the backup script when /media/stephan/Documents gets mounted [Service] ...


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To get a copy of the command you "would" have used, go all the way through the process and then at the end, hit go to command prompt, then cd into /tmp and there should be a file called ocs-FILENAMEYOUCHOSE. Nano it and copy its contents. That is the command. But you will have to change file name inside command or it will overwrite/fail trying to copy same ...


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If you are using Deja-Dup you click on Storage location in the left column, then click on the down arrow in the top box. Scroll down and select "Local Folder". Then, back on the main screen, click on Choose Folder and find where your network share is mounted. I found it a little confusing at first to look for my network share in Local Folders too....


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Try gnome-disk-image-mounter: $ gnome-disk-image-mounter sda.img No sudo required. It will be mounted at /media/your_user_name/partition_name, just like USB drives.


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Try to add your external Hdd to fstab so that it's automounted while booting Get the UUID Run the command: sudo blkid Then open /etc/fsatb: sudo gedit /etc/fstab Now add the line to the bottom of /etc/fsatb: UUID=UUID /mounting-point ext4 defaults 0 2 Replace UUID with result of your UUID of /dev/sdX Replace /mounting-point with path to ...


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Changing permissions in fstab in order to allow writing for this partition, or just change permissions for backup folder


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Remove chrome remote desktop mine was using 3Gb of RAM, after login CPU would be zero and IOwoit would shoot too 90% and freeze every time.


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After making the snapshot, any files that are in the middle of being written will still be half written in the snapshot, and the new writes to go the original volume. This can cause corruption of the file, just like a crash or loss of power. If you are running applications that can't cope with a sudden power loss, then shut them down ( maybe boot into ...


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It depends: if you have console access (that is: can you access the BIOS and boot the server remotely from different partitions) then yes, you can use CloneZilla by installing it on a small FAT partition of your disk and booting it from there once the install is finished. If you only have access to Ubuntu itself after it was booted, then no, CloneZilla is ...


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A conflict between the source filenames and the destination filesystem can cause your cannot create regular file error. If you are copying to a USB thumb drive, you are probably using the vfat or fat32 filesystem, which is subject to the usual Windows naming restrictions. To observe this, try creating a file named :, which is a Windows reserved character. ...


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Déjà Dup is a file back-up program that is quite easy to use and does what 95% of users need 99% of the time. However, it is not the most intelligent back-up solution around. As you re-installed your system and you have a different host name and user name, Déjà Dup cannot find the files the new user is looking for… Therefore, you have to restore all files ...


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I ended the process found in the system monitor and the buttons immediately 'ungreyed'. They way I got into the problem was canceling a backup to postpone figuring out a password for it. I had shut down the machine several times since then but it was still stuck there I guess.


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Clonezilla is great, but if you ever need to restore to a smaller partition it becomes a pain. I prefer to use fsarchiver, which quickly creates very compressed backups that can be deployed anywhere you need them. There's a neat PDF with a recommended backup model found here: https://github.com/issmirnov/dotfiles/blob/master/bin/fsarchiver/backup-ver2.pdf ...


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Always use hardware RAID if you can afford it as a software RAID might give OS compatibility problems... (Dual-boot with Windows, Using a boot CD to repair your system, ...) Use RAID5: write speed is a bit slower then the disks all by themselves, but read speed is superior. As to which controller: buy the most expensive one your budget allows you to buy ...


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You can backup your entire hard drive in many different ways, including cp, clonezilla, rsync, tar ... As I admire functionality of clonezilla, I sometimes prefer rsync because it allows you immediate access to your files on backup storage, in your case external hard drive. It will have exactly same directory structure and you may just browse folders, files ...


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Install Clonezilla from Ubuntu Software Center or run sudo apt-get install clonezilla Then run sudo clonezilla It will have a CLI menu to copy full disk or partitions to an external drive.


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If I reinstall my desktop system, I backup /etc /var, I'am to lazy to exclude some sub-folders /opt /home is on a separate partition and has always a backup every day. After the reinstall I restore the parts from my backup, which I really need. With this strategy, all my configurations, local mails and crontab configurations are save and I have to ...


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My backup sets currently contain /var (except /var/run, /var/cache, /var/tmp) /srv /etc /root /home /usr (/usr/local only, nothing else) Note this is for a server, so backing up things like /etc saves all my configuration for my services, I have web servers in /srv (though if you have them in /var/www, they would still be in this backup set), I have ...


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Just a reminder if you're using DejaDup (or anything else really), also exclude any cloud storage folders (likely in your home), such as Dropbox. If you're paying for s3 storage this could be a bad mistake.


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If your PC runs all the time you can try (as root) crontab -e to start the cron editor. Cron is a service that executes a script at a configured time or after a time intervall has ended. Now add a line similar to # m h dom mon dow command 0 1 * * 0 /root/mybackupscript.sh 2> /dev/null Then create the /root/mybackupscript.sh: ...


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You can use Cronopete. Cronopete is a backup utility for Linux, modeled after Apple's Time Machine. It aims to simplify the creation of periodic backups.Launchpad. To install, just press Ctrl+Alt+T on your keyboard to open Terminal. When it opens, run the command(s) below: sudo apt-add-repository ppa:rastersoft-gmail/cronopetedev sudo apt-get update ...


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What you need is LVM. This is a disk abstraction layer unlike the partitions you've been using until now and actually replaces them. LVM has built-in snapshots which allows you to freeze an existing Logical Volume in time, at any moment, even while the system is running. You can continue to use the original volume normally, but the snapshot volume appears ...


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No, this will not work… The built-in back-up does a data backup, not a system back-up… The easiest way to do what you ask is to: Download the CloneZilla LiveCD and burn it. Edit your fstab and get rid of all the UIDs and change them back to /dev/XdY (where X and Y are the original drive locations, probably s and a respectively. Put the SSD in an ...


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You will need to put an EOF at the end of your script. ftp -in <<EOF open $ftp_site user $username $passwd bin put /home/manideep/hetzner$filenameob put /home/manideep/hetznerftp/pgdump.backup close bye EOF


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Yes you can copy a full Ubuntu OS (with Programs, customizations and all ) from your Desktop or Laptop Hard drive to an external USB Flash Drive or external Hard drive. I just did it for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS to an external Hard drive (but equally applicable to USB Flash drive as well) Required software / hardware: 1 Destination External Hard Drive / Destination ...


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What I did was: split up the system between / and home. That way I can just clone my system using partclone from CloneZilla in 20 minutes flat over USB 2.0 and use backintime do do incremental backups of /home. The next thing I'm going to try is timeshift which looks like it has everything you need... (But: I haven't even tried that one for back-ups, let ...


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You should start by reading BackupYourSystem wiki. Incremental backup (to an FTP server, perhaps) using Duplicity should be an ideal way for you I guess. Duplicity backs up directories by producing encrypted tar-format volumes and uploading them to a remote or local site. It uses librsync to record incremental changes to files; gzip to compress them; and ...


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You're missing some dependencies. Please install them with sudo apt-get install python3-dbus python3-dbus.mainloop.qt Using sudo backintime causes some troubles because of wrong $HOME. Please use either sudo -i backintime for command-line or gksudo backintime-gnome for the old Gnome GUI or pkexec backintime-qt4 for the new Qt4 GUI instead. Disclaimer: ...


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I would combine parts 1 and 2. MySql allows you to take encrypted backups as detailed here: mysqlbackup --backup-image=/backups/image.enc --encrypt --key-file=/meb/key --backup-dir=/var/tmp/backup backup-to-image The next bit would be to push the image up to a cloud service. This comes down to personal preference. If you like Dropbox, it has a ...



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