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I was confusing things. The /etc/cron.d/rsnapshot file came with the rsnapshot package, it was not created by the crontab command (hence, why it had a different schedule). It is not necessary to use the crontab command at all, simply edit the /etc/cron.d/rsnapshot, this works fine.


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Deja-dup preferences should be available from the command line by running: deja-dup-preferences Also this question goes into how to add an item to the system settings. You can use locate "deja-dup-preferences.desktop" to see if you have a .desktop file lying around to modify for this. Or you could just put the following into a new file at ...


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Well it looks like in my wine folders it was linking to my Z: drive which is the root directory. Once I deleted all the wine folders it works.


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Unison is a great tool for syncing between multiple systems over SSH. It provides two way syncing and works on all platforms (Linux, OSX, Windows). You can run it either through shells, or, for MacOSX and Windows, there is also a GUI option. I just set one up between all 3 platforms (Win, OSX, Linux) using a Desktop as the "server" and syncing from a few ...


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For backing up stuff remotely without cloud, you can try BitTorrent Sync. Here is an answer on how to set it up on Ubuntu: How to run BitTorrent Sync? I personally have a few different boxes running BTSync, making sure I have multiple physical backups available at all times. It is quite simple to use and is cross-platform.


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Create a file: /etc/cron.monthly/backups.sh make it executable by: $ chmod +x /etc/cron.monthly/backups.sh to tidy it up, create a variable: DATE=`date +%Y.%m.%d-%H.%M.%S` # eg. 2016.04.22-13.01.59 And then reference your command above with: /bckupftp/backup${DATE}.tar.gz It would produce a file similar to: ...


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To set up the cronjob for yr present non-root user, do in terminal: $ crontab -e The above will open yr (non-root) user's crontab with his/her default editor. Alternatively, to do so for the root crontab, but with yr present (presumably non-root) user environment parameters (default editor, etc.): $ sudo -i crontab -e In yr opened crontab, enter a new ...


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There is a good software with a GUI to do that called Fslint that you can install by your default repositories: apt-get update && apt-get install fslint With this software, you can detect duplicates files by using the names but also the content (may be longer with content).


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So I like to make backups using a bash script like this DATE=date +%Y%m%d-%H%M tar -jcvf /home/backup/myfiles-$DATE.tBz2 dirtobackup1 dirtoback2 If you want you can run something like this to clean it up find /home/backup/ -ctime +2 -exec rm {} \; This has a number of advantages over what you are asking. Backups are compressed and in files. Since ...


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Install the s3 backend for dej-dup: sudo apt install deja-dup-backend-s3 Use dconf-editor under org -> gnome -> dejadup to copy the settings for the base installation. Also copy the keys for the S3 bucket and the encryption password. Open the deja-dup and start restore. Hint: Disable auto backup on both installations. Create a new bucket for backups for ...


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When you backup and restore, the permissions need to be identical, otherwise, you will not be able to log in. You could probably boot into recovery mode and do a recursive chown on your home directory. This should probably fix it.


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I ran into the same issue. While dogonthehorizon's answer might give you the desired results in the end, you would also have to deal with fixing dependency issues when trying to install an older build of partclone. Instead, stop using partclone.restore, it is considered deprecated. Use partclone.ext4 as the maintained alternative in combination with the ...


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Based on this documentation you can use tar to make backup of whole your system in just one command: sudo tar -cvpzf backup.tar.gz --exclude=/backup.tar.gz --one-file-system / It will create backup.tar.gz archive in folder where you are in. You can change destination as you wish (e.g pendrive) If you have your home on different partition you need to ...


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That's easy to solve. Backup / (yes, that's the file system root), but define in/excludes to only backup the folders you want eg. --include '/home/user1' --exclude '**' more info about in/excluding can be found on duplicity's man page.


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It is not mentioned in documentation but "it would be great to follow symbolic links when they are the source of the backup", "I'm unable to include files in the backup that are within a directory that is a symlink." and other make clear that Duplicity is not following symbolic links and as of 2016-04 it is impossible to enable following symbolic links in ...


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"System" cron jobs are run through the /etc/crontab file, not through the root user's crontab file /var/spool/cron/crontabs/root, which is what sudo crontab -e edits. /etc/crontab on my Ubuntu 14.04.3 system is (Note the informative #comments): # /etc/crontab: system-wide crontab # Unlike any other crontab you don't have to run the `crontab' # command to ...


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Clonezilla can actually be quite friendly. The live CD doesn't require any command line usage - I'd be quite happy to call it a GUI even though it doesn't use the mouse - and I think the defaults are OK for a lot of cases. The problem is something you didn't explicitly call out: it doesn't seem to be designed as something you can install on an arbitrary ...


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You cannot do automated differential backups with tar using the --diff operation mode. This is because the --diff operation mode will only look for differences between files already in the tar file and the files of the file system. If a file that resides in the tar file is missing in the file system tar will give you this message: tar: etc/test.txt: ...


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I find the most simple process is to use two programs: Back-in-time to back up /home and /etc Aptik to back up programs


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You can use the GUI (Gdebi package installer) to install it after downloading the software from MegaSync website.


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There is a proper location. There is a standard for proper filesystem structure. Its current version has been around for over a decade, which might be news to some Linux distros. The latest version of the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard is 2.3: http://www.pathname.com/fhs/pub/fhs-2.3.html There, under the "Purpose" section of var, it explains why that's a ...


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You can do what you want with one single command, with caveats. Read on. NOTICE: What follows is almost integrally quoted from this archlinux.org wiki. I introduced just a few changes in wording and format here and there, but nothing substantial. All the merit definitely goes to maintainers of and contributors to the excellent wiki.archlinux.org. This ...


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If you need direct access to your backup files, then rdiff-backup is the very best answer. It creates a mirror of your original files and directories, and changed/deleted files are stored as increment files, which must be first restored, of course. But accessing a file that is in the mirror? Simply locate it on the backup, and copy it over to your computer. ...


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In short, you manually mounted your /dev/sda6 (whatever it is). But at shut down, it is unmounted and you'd have to manually mount again after restarting. You can make the mount permanent through /etc/fstab. Assuming that your /dev/sda6 is a partition of your hard drive and that it has an ext4 filesystem on it, you can use these steps to permanently put ...


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Just type: man deja-dup in the terminal and read the manual of deja-dup. what you need is probably: deja-dup --restore [FILES?] Between the bracket type the whole address of the Deja-dup file/s


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The feature you want is called Persistence. If you want to make a new USB, with persistence: Many Linux USB creators offer an option to enable Persistence. In Ubuntu's USB creator: And Unetbootin (Windows tool to create Linux bootable USBs): If you want to make your existing USB Persistent: Create an empty file called casper-rw in the USB's root ...


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Put the user file you want in ~/.config/dconf/ named as user.old Then go ctrl+alt+f3 to go to a tty. When there login & from prompt - rm /home/yourusername/.config/dconf/user mv /home/yourusername/.config/dconf/user.old /home/yourusername/.config/dconf/user sudo reboot


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I know this question already has an accepted answer. However, I wanted to add a cross platform GUI solution as I see you also use windows. I use for the same purposes Freefilesync. It is also FLOSS. The configuration is absolutely intuitive and you can save different synchronization jobs. There is also a ppa, though it does not include the latest version ...


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To answer your second question, a more fancy way to backup is rdiff-backup. rdiff-backup backs up one directory to another, possibly over a network. The target directory ends up a copy of the source directory, but extra reverse diffs are stored in a special subdirectory of that target directory, so you can still recover files lost some time ago. ...


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You're sort of describing what rsync was designed for. From man rsync: Rsync finds files that need to be transferred using a "quick check" algorithm (by default) that looks for files that have changed in size or in last-modified time. Any changes in the other preserved attributes (as requested by options) are made on the ...



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