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First you have to execlude .gvfs if GVFS is installed. rsync -vaxE --progress --delete --log-file='./rsync-log' --exclude={"/home/*/.gvfs"} / /media/me/Backup/ Or if you use /home as separate partition then remove -x option rsync -vaE --progress --delete --log-file='./rsync-log' --exclude={"/home/*/.gvfs"} / /media/me/Backup/


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You are using the -x option, so I'm going to guess /home is on a separate partition. From man rsync: -x, --one-file-system don't cross filesystem boundaries


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It's probably because of different filesystems used. For example, Ubuntu uses ext4 by default, while USB drives generally use FAT32 and Windows uses NTFS. ext4 has some unallowed charcters: NUL (\0), / and the special file names . and .. (Wikipedia). The reason / is unallowed is because it's used for directories, and ext4 would probably get confused between ...


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Start Backups from System Settings, and click on Storage Locations in the left pane. Make sure that the directory listed there is correct.


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First off, make sure you backup everything you've got on the Windows partitions. I would then suggest trying gparted. It might let you remove the existing Windows partitions and expand the Ubuntu partitions without losing any data (depending on how the partitions are laid out).


-1

use sudo cfdisk If you dont know how to use cfdisk this might help


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This application does not back up your installed programs. You will have to reinstall them.


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Well the best way to do this is to make a 1:1 backup of the whole drive and save it. You could use simply dd, but to be honest there is a much better way to achieve this. Simply use clonezilla, there is a live CD available you can use to copy one harddrive to another and even a restore option. Looking into this tool is definetly worth it. All you need is ...


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Any files you move on your drives using the live cd will be moved on these drives. In other words, these files are "moved in windows as well" to use your words. There are a few things that you want to go about carefully, though: Copy rather than cut your files. If something is wrong with the harddrive you might lose files while cutting. Make sure you ...


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I've taken a somewhat different and perhaps incompatible approach to yours. Rather than save the btrfs send stream with -f, I always btrfs receive to reproduce the snapshot on the backup media (also a btrfs filesystem). Additionally, all snapshots are indistinguishable from each other - there is no difference between monthlies, daylies, hourlies etc. - they ...


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The problem that you are having isn't related to the file system you are putting on the disk, it's related to how you are mounting it. If you want all users to be able to use the disk I suggest you mount the entire disk at system boot in by editing /etc/fstab or partition the disk with separate backup partitions for each user and mount those partitions by ...


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From the SurDoc FAQ: Does SurDoc provide WebDAV or FTP access? SurDoc doesn’t support WebDAV or FTP access at this time. So, no. Deja Dup cannot support SurDoc storage using standard protocols. Looks like you need to use their Windows app under wine: Is there a SurDoc client for Linux? There’s no SurDoc client for Linux yet but our ...


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That feature isn't supported by Deja Dup. It IS supported by the underlying duplicity command line tool though. See duplicity's man page for help using it.


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I see a problem with your commands: /dev/sdg1 in the 1st error. /dev/sdf in the 2nd error. g-io-error-quark, 19 means "Method name you invoked isn’t known by the object you invoked it on." So I would assume your 1st command has an invalid device and it should be /dev/sdf1. Regarding the superblock error: start here and read the link in post 2 So how ...


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It appears that you have an eCryptfs encrypted home directory. You should be able to access the encrypted home directory rather easily: Get a Ubuntu live CD/USB, preferably of a recent version, and boot into it Mount your root partition (either your /home partition if you have one, or the root partition otherwise) Run ecryptfs-recover-private ...


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It's fine to include such directories in a backup as long as your user can READ the files (users can often, but not always, read root-owned files). But if your user can't read the files, I recommend running duplicity directly via cron. Deja Dup is designed for users, not system administrators.


4

First of all, if your drive is experiencing I/O errors you should check if your drive is healthy enough. I/O errors might be localized only on a/some specific bad block/bad blocks, but having one/some is how a drive failure usually starts. You can use smartctl to check your drive's S.M.A.R.T. status, which provides many informations about the drive's ...


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Authentication is done via "Login with Amazon" which is based on OAuth2. There is a getting started guide here. They offer an HTTP API for accessing the data. I never looked at the duplicity connectors, but there might be some that utilize HTTP already.


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Try to boot into a DVD of Ubuntu, then mount /dev/sda5 via: mkdir /tmp/sda5 mount /dev/sda5 /tmp/sda5 Then, after this, edit fstab nano /tmp/sda5/etc/fstab And you should look for a line that begins with '/'. This should be /dev/sda5 not /dev/sda3. If it is not, then adjust appropriately. Also make sure that your /home and other settings are correct in ...


-1

more convenient terminal mounting: udisksctl mount -b /dev/sdg1. (or maybe other block dev name; udiskctl dump prints info to help you find out)


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In order to avoid filesystem corruption, you need to run dd from a Live CD/USB. This ensures that the filesystem you copy does not change while dd copies it.


0

ubuntu use deja dup as default here you have a guide. guide link if that dosent work in this discucion you have sevral tools to do backups . Backup tools


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Make a test folder such as usbmount under /: sudo mkdir /usbmount and change UUID=E89AF5299AF4F542 /usbmount ntfs defaults,users 0 0 and sudo reboot or sudo mount -a In a nutshell avoid these kind of strings such as /media/username/f6c682f3-5271-4f2b-99e8-93aa3bd39990/ in fstab previously i had such a bad experience with such strings i.e samba ...


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In Linux everything is a file (That does not mean you can back them up) Technically everything is not files (I am no expert). However, some folders are special in the sense that they are not real folders. /proc is just one of them. It is a virtual file system that contains runtime file information. In other words, its contents keep changing as the system ...


2

Ignore them. You're trying to copy files from /proc which is both pointless and won't work, as you saw. Those are basically runtime files vreated by the OS. There's no need or reason to have backups of such files. So, the simple approach is to just ignore the errors. You can also stop them appearing by redirecting error output to /dev/null: sudo cp -r / ...


0

Have you ruled out the possibility that you didn't back them up properly in the first place? In other words, the restore operation worked perfectly, but nothing was saved, so no messages were restored.


2

Aptik is really good. By using it and Deja-Dup I have just blown away a system (on purpose) and recreated it in only a hour or so. Here's a picture of the Aptik screen. I've used the first 3 buttons to save my configuration and reload it onto the new system. The 4th button seems to largely duplicate Deja-Dup's functionality, so I didn't use it. The ...


0

Yes, there are some in the software center. I just searched for it and the first one which came up was "booster". You can also keep a list of the applications you want to install right after a new installation. sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install gnome-search-tool gparted This command currently installs Gnome Search Tool and GParted. ...


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If you are talking about backing up your files, that is to say, documents in your home directory, then it should be fine. If you are talking about backing up the whole system and trying to restore it, then no, that would bastardize your ubuntu system into a mint ubuntu hybrid and cause a lot of breakage.


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I'd really suggest doing it the 'old fashioned' way - with a few tweaks. dump a package list make copies of /etc/ and /home/ and other important directories If you're suspecting that mate config is the issue and want to install mate in ubuntu rename or delete /home/your_username/.mateconf/ do a fresh install of ubuntu (optionally with a DE of your choice) ...


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Yes, that should be fine. The Mint backup tool is easy enough to install on Ubuntu (and it might be a good idea, it's a useful tool) but it's not needed. It simply copies your files. It doesn't use any kind of proprietary format that would make it hard for you to access them. The choices it provides you with are to either copy the files as they are or to ...


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actually, yes it is possible. do your normal rsyncscript.sh you will need to generate keys using the command ssh-keygen in your home directory, go to .ssh/id_rsa.pub and copy that into the other servers /authorized_keys file


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The two format are not compatible. If you want to re-use your exclude list from rsync you have to: use --exclude-globbing-filest on duplicity prefix each line of your rsync's exclude list file with **. You can achieve the latter with sed: sed -e 's/^/**\//' rsync_backup_exclude_file >> duplicity_backup_exclude_file


2

The best option, if you can, is to set up key-based SSH authentication on the remote server, and use a key with no passphrase on the client. This will allow the SSH connection, which rsync uses when you use that [user@]server:path notation, to happen without prompting for a password. Ubuntu documentation for doing this is at: ...


1

This worked for me when connecting remotely to a machine and logging in/out. Will test in a few hours at home with a full reboot, will edit with my findings I also found this which seems to do exactly the same. I have never thought about this feature before and glad you brought it up! EDIT I run Gnome 3 and wasn't able to find the setting as mentioned in ...


0

Do you want to do some countdown, while screen is active? If so, you could change your if and for with while loop, like this: while (screen -list backup|grep -q backup); do # delay sleep 1 # display another dot echo -n . done This displays a dot every second until your screen session terminates. As for countdown, how would you even know ...


0

Check the AptOnCD tool. It can backup and restore all of your installed packages.


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You can recover these files using testdisk: Run testdisk Select No Log Select the disk where Ubuntu is installed Select the partition table (usually Intel or GPT) Select Analyse Select Quick Search Highlight the root partition (usually Linux) Press p key Navigate to /var/cache/apt/archives Highlight the first entry (the entry that has . as name) Press c ...



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