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0

DD probably isn't the right tool to do a backup. As Rmano said, it's making a direct copy of /dev/sda4 (probably to /dev/sda4). His answer is spot on, however, I apparently don't have enough reputation to reply to your comment (still new to this particular Ubuntu community). Check out rsync for doing backups.


2

Set DEJA_DUP_DEBUG=1 like so on the command line: DEJA_DUP_DEBUG=1 deja-dup --backup


5

If you copy a partition with dd, the output file will be as big as the partition. dd does a physical copy of the disc, it has no knowledge of blank or used space. If you compress the result file you will save a lot of space, though, given that blank space will compress away very well (beware, this is going to be computationally very heavy). You can ...


1

Finally, I got remastersys CLI working in 14.04 LTS, Actually I copied files of Remastersys 12.04 version which were in /etc/remastersys and /etc/remastersys.conf to same directory of 14.04 INstallation and /usr/bin/remastersys , /usr/bin/remastersys-skelcopy to respective directory. Installed dependcies, as suggested by FORK of remastersys, Black Lab ...


1

TL;DR: install partclone 0.2.58 from source and attempt the partclone step again. I stumbled upon this question while attempting to do something similar on my Arch-Linux machine. I approached the problem a little differently than you did but I'm hoping that my solution will at least get you on the right track. I first unpacked the compressed backup that I ...


1

I've got a solution! I know its way to late for the original enquirer, but may be it helps some other guys. So on a fresh install (of the OS or Deja Dup) the folder ~/downloads is ignored. That's why Deja Dup is thinking there is no backup (a little bit stupid, could also show the option and check then...). So to restore your downloads, you have to remove ...


1

Use a conventional backup tool like tar or dump. The main reason for doing an image type backup ( which you can do with clonezilla ), is that it can image the entire disk, including the boot loader, saving you the trouble of having to restore that as a separate step when restoring the backup. Since you plan on only backing up the one partition however, ...


1

MintBackup seems to be a good solution. This tool comes with Linux Mint as a way to back up your files, directories, and packages. Since your settings are generally contained in your home directory, you could tell it to back that up, then later restore it. Then, all your settings would be preserved as well. You can find information on installing the ...


0

You can easily install tuxboot from the ppa:thomas.tsai/ubuntu-tuxboot PPA. Thus you don't need to compile it or to use the pre-compiled binaries from the project website.


0

Installing applications should never do harm to your system when dependencies can be solved. If that was not the case then we should consider this a bug of the respective application. This may not be so clear if we wanted to play with unstable pre-release versions, or if we need to remove an application and it's dependency again, as we may not be able to ...


0

If I understand you correctly, you are booting with /dev/sda as the first drive in the BIOS boot order, but are actually loading the system from /dev/sdb. If that is true, all you have to do is mount the correct partition from /dev/sda. You'd do something like this: mkdir -p /mnt/wdhdd sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/wdhdd If you have trouble figuring out ...


1

If you need to access some of your back-upped files frequently, go for a back-up solution like Rsnapshot or BackInTime, and leave duplicity-based backup solutions like Deja-Dup. It will save you a lot of time.


0

Not sure if your problem persists but I add what I see on Ubuntu 14.04 for completeness. I can easily add /etc to my backup locations in deja dup and it does get backed up. However, there are folders that are not readable to anyone other than their owner, which makes sense e.g. for certain system services, user passwords or private encryption keys. It is ...


0

There's more to it than .config and such from your home dir. The login screen wallpaper is somewhere like /usr/share/lubuntu/wallpapers, and if you customized the bootloader it's yet somewhere else. I wonder how people scoop stuff up for "themes" like this one -- http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2014/04/windows-xp-theme-lubuntu Is there a script or package that ...


0

I'm facing the same problem as you did. Since the .wine folder are actually linked with Documents folder, it's probably gone. However, you can try to recover some of the files by referring to this page http://www.webupd8.org/2009/03/recover-deleted-files-in-ubuntu-debian.html. Hope it can help.


0

Ensure your external hard drive is connected, powered and mounted. If this is the case you should be able to view to files in Nautilus, the File Manager. Then you should find the location of the folder you backed your files up to. Navigate there using Nautilus, such that you are in the folder with all the compressed backup files. Now press ctrl+L to bring ...


1

USB Backup Drive does not show up complete after a successful dd backup Don't do that, especially with lvm; use a proper backup method instead. By copying the whole thing bit for bit, you now have two volumes that have the same UUID, and this makes them difficult or impossible to differentiate. In the case of LVM, this may cause the system to ...


0

I also had the same screen when I put it in the USB 2.0 but when I plugged it into the USB 3.0 port then it would be detected and you can see it with lsusb.


2

To answer your first question: yes, you would simply restore the /home folder from the backup location and you're done. After a fresh install, it's OK to restore the backup files over any new files that may have been created. However, you will need to manually reinstall any (non-standard) applications that were installed on your old disk. There are ways to ...


0

I had the same issue. Following rbello1824's link I was able to resolve it. I had to select the custom location option and manually enter the location as: smb://WORKGROUP\Username@server/Folder Worked perfect! Thanks rbello!


-1

If you're talking about your files and documents, yes there is no problem (There could be a problem in restoring a program which depends on a 32 bits library which is not in the 64 bits version, but otherwise I don't see any issue)


0

You can choose to install Ubuntu 12.04.4 LTS inside Windows on any of your NTFS partitions using wubi installer. This way you can keep your Windows installation, and have Ubuntu installed and/or removed like any other regular piece of software designed for windows. A wubi installation is as fast as a normal Ubuntu installation but you cannot allocate more ...


0

Yes you can. Make a restoration image by windows and create a bootable windows disk. http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/windows-and-office/create-a-recovery-drive-in-windows-8/7261/ http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/windows-and-office/restore-windows-8-with-system-image-recovery/7464/


0

If you run in terminal: ./home/user/backup.sh you will get probably an error like: bash: ./home/user/backup.sh: No such file or directory That because in this case is not correct to use that . (dot) in front of the path to the scipt (/home/user/backup.sh). Also be sure that backup.sh is executable by running: chmod +x /home/user/backup.sh And also, ...


0

dd, as mentioned by a previous poster, is the native way to go. You'll want it to continue over errors, though, so you'd start it with: dd if=<usb device> of=<new file on disk with enough space> bs=<should match your blocksize> conv=noerror,sync The important part is the last one: conv=sync tells dd to pad all those blocks it could read ...


1

If you cannot get any advanced graphics running, but you still can log in and use the terminal of your installed Ubuntu, do the following to save your data: method 1 start the computer, connect an external drive to store the backup First you have to find out the exact drivename and mountpoint of the external drive: start a terminal and type lsblk ...


0

Another way using the graphical interface is to install Dropbox on your system, create a folder within the Dropbox folder. After doing those steps point the backup to it using the custom location choice. After the backup is complete the Dropbox client will automatically upload the backup to the cloud.


0

The problem I believe you are having is when you do a dd the new drive still does not have the same guid as the old drive. This will cause problems because your initrd images are built for the wrong drive. Lvm is the answer to your needs. Install your system using lvm partitions and you can snapshot live partitions, back them up, put them on new drives, ...


0

You might also consider TimeShift. The project page is on Launchpad. Timeshift's main use is to create a system restore point before making (potentially risky) system changes, as stated on the web site: TimeShift is similar to applications like rsnapshot, BackInTime and TimeVault but with different goals. TimeShift is designed to protect only ...


0

Deja Dup is just a front-end (and configuration helper) for Duplicity. From its --help, you can see what it supports: cf+http://container_name file:///some_dir ftp://user[:password]@other.host[:port]/some_dir ftps://user[:password]@other.host[:port]/some_dir hsi://user[:password]@other.host[:port]/some_dir ...


0

One of my favorite services that no one is listing is BitTorrent Sync. They offer UNLIMITED transfer and storage space; it works just like Dropbox. The ONLY downside is that it is indeed BitTorrent; one computer has to be on with the files. I just let it run on my laptop. It's multiplatform, and its incredibly sharable. Ther's also Dropbox, which I highly ...


30

The following is a list of the cloud services similar to Ubuntu One that work in Ubuntu (Can be installed with a .DEB file) and may provide support for the Unity Systray: Dropbox Website - https://www.dropbox.com/ Starting Free Space - 2 GB Bonus Space - 25 GB to 50 GB when used on an Smartphone Characteristics - Sync Files/Folders between devices. Unity ...


1

I use Google Drive with Insync. I think Insync is the most decent cloud service client for Ubuntu, as you can leave your files where they are, because Insync can follow symlinks.


0

OneMediaHub (Funambol) is a good one. It's supported by large amounts of different hardware and operating systems. I sync my Android device with Google, Evolution, my Nokia N8, etc. It's really quite good. It's open source as well, so you can run it yourself if you want to. It supports notes, contacts, calendar, todo, pictures, video, music and other ...


0

I got this message on ubuntu 13.10 too after having: Logged-in with a user Mounted an external drive Switched to a second user sudo umounted the external drive and mounted it within the second user The drive resulted mounted and reachable but deja-dup was returning that error solution: rebooting and mounting directly the drive within the user I needed ...


0

Maybe is solution for you to have swap on file. You not need partition and can create one for ubuntu one for kali on / partition. create file with name swapfile dd if=/dev/zero of=/swapfile bs=1024 count=21474836480 count is size of file create swap "file system" mkswap /swapfile turn on swap swapon /swapfile write to /etc/fstab sudo nano ...


1

Note that you will likely need to rename the database file when you port it, as Chrome auto-assigns a numeric value upon SB install. Immediately after re-installing SB, take note of the name of the database file created. Shut down Chrome and move, rename, or delete the file. Copy in your original database file and rename it to match the noted name.


2

Your data is saved in your chrome profile folder. To go there, type : chrome://version/ in your chrome browser open a terminal, and navigate to the Profile Path given by the page mentioned above backup the folder : myprofile/databases/chrome-extension_edacconmaakjimmfgnblocblbcdcpbko_0 you should be able to restore it by copying to your new profile folder ...


0

Problem solved. The cron job was running each night but not completing. The problem was with the script. The cron shell did not interpret "==" as equal, i.e. in the cron shell "1==1" was evaluated as false. However, when I ran the program at the command line it worked. I read somewhere that the bash shell understands == or = to mean equal... but the ...


1

You can create reflinks in a backup directory to everything under /home/user, which is very similar to what a snapshot is. For example you could run something like cp -rax --reflink /home/user /backup/home/user. (Both /home/user and /backup/home/user need to be on the same btrfs volume.) This will copy the directory structure and the inodes (meta-data), but ...


-1

I figured it out... I inserted the Ubuntu install CD and duel booted Ubuntu with Ubuntu and the computer booted fine.


0

I have always just used rsync to backup my home directory to a NAS. I care only about my data. Installing Ubuntu and applications from repositories after a complete disaster is relatively easy anyway. You could consider using dd to copy the whole disk image if you wish, but I honestly think it's pointless in the Linux world. Here are instructions (and a ...


0

My money's on Benoit for having the truly correct answer here, but as soon as you can verify that your script executes you will likely find some additional errors. In short, make sure you also check your environment! You're half way there by using variables that define the location of the commands (MYSQL="$(which mysql)") but which mysql just reads your ...


0

Ensure to run: sudo crontab -e (or crontab -e as root) And add the desired script: */15 * * * * /bin/bash /home/wayne/scripts/mysql_backup.sh This will initiate the cron every 15 minutes, obviously you may want to change that.


1

Unless you've skipped some characters when writting the syslog output in your question, it looks like you've made a typo in your CRON command by forgetting the / in front of the command that should looks like : /home/wayne/scripts/mysql_backup.sh


1

This is very easy to do from Ubuntu Software Center Open software center and click on 'File' menu. And then, click the option 'Sync Between Computers...' After you click that, a sidebar would appear on the left side. It will list software in the local computer and the list will be uploaded in the Ubuntu One cloud. See the Last sync at the bottom ...


-1

I don't know if I get you right but backup in Ubuntu it's not that necessary, anyways if you want to collect and have access from different computer to all manually downloaded apps in a Cloud just use Ubuntu One Cloud create a folder in a Ubuntu One folder for example Apps then copy&paste your apps to that folder and simply sync it. If you need to see ...



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