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16

You can use CLONEZILLA for this purpose. Clonezilla is a free partition and disk imaging/cloning tool which can be used to backup all your data (whole disks or partitions) in a highly compressed way and later clone it back to your hard disk to get it into exact same condition. This is faster than installing the OS most of the times. Download Clonezilla ...


13

For Ubuntu 16.04+ using systemd (the default). systemd-inhibit --why="Wait for this script to finish" bash script.sh === Test: $ systemctl poweroff Operation inhibited by "bash script.sh" (PID 23912 "systemd-inhibit", user rinzwind), reason is "Wait for this script to finish". Please retry operation after closing inhibitors and logging out other users. ...


12

It can be done in a few ways. But the easiest one is to just copy all files from the old drive to the new one. Create an ext4 partition and a swap partition on the new drive. Boot from LiveUSB. Mount the old Ubuntu partition to some directory, mount the new one to some other directory. Copy all files from the old one to the new one using cp -a command. ...


11

You're sort of describing what rsync was designed for. From man rsync: Rsync finds files that need to be transferred using a "quick check" algorithm (by default) that looks for files that have changed in size or in last-modified time. Any changes in the other preserved attributes (as requested by options) are made on the ...


9

In case you have some time and want to go safe: $ dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/sdb bs=64K conv=noerror,sync Explanation of the command: if is the input, of the destination bs sets the block size. It's the size of the chunks dd will read and write in. Higher Chunk sizes usually means higher performance but also more corruption of data if input disk has errors, ...


7

The easiest way to automate this task would be the combination of MySQL Dumps and a cronjob. You can find a lot of information on this topic on this and other internet sites, but for the sake of completion: Create a mysqldump.sh file Which will contain the mysql dump command we will schedule in a cron job (replace user, password and path to match your ...


5

The standards fonts directories are: /usr/share/fonts, /usr/local/share/fonts, and ~/.fonts. You backup those directories, then when you've restored the contents run: sudo fc-cache -f -v and your fonts will be available to your system [edit] you can also use fc-list to list all installed font before the backup


5

You can keep the NTFS partition with your files, if you have enough free space. Just shrink the NTFS partition, install Ubuntu, then copy your files to an Ubuntu partition. After that you will be able to safely remove the NTFS partition and expand Ubuntu partition(s). That is one of the ways not involving external storage.


5

You need to pass the command components as elements of a list, so you can add tar to the TAR_CMD variable and then use split(' ') to create a list of command components separated on spaces: TAR_CMD='tar .....' subprocess.call(TAR_CMD.split(' ')) Or directly: subprocess.call('tar ....'.split(' '))


5

I Would do this: Change to ROOT mode from a Live CD/USB Preferrably, if not it will still work from a dual-booted Linux install. Open a terminal and type: sudo -i Then, find out which partition is your Windows via this command: fdisk -l Mine shows this: /dev/sda1 * 2048 206847 204800 100M 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT /dev/sda2 206848 ...


4

How to backup dconf settings like keyboard shortcuts Dump them all to a file: dconf dump / >~/.config/dconf/user.conf Open that file on a text editor and select the settings that you care about: editor ~/.config/dconf/user.conf If you use Vim, you will want this syntax highlight. You will soon ask yourself what is <Primary>. If you don't ...


4

For those wanting a nice. neat GUI... ...introducing Aptik. All you need is a backup directory, stored locally or in the cloud. Aptik will backup PPAs, downloaded packages, software selections, application settings and themes and icons. Very useful. You can install it through the ppa: sudo apt-add-repository –y ppa:teejee2008/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo ...


4

Aptik After seeing the various answers here (and not disagreeing with any of them) it strikes me that you asked for simplicity. In my comment, I linked to an application called Aptik and I'm going to show you why I think this meets your criteria best. Aptik is simple to install and trivially easy to use. It is also a handy dandy GUI (Graphical User ...


4

You can just copy everything inside it (i.e. e.g. sudo cp -R /boot/efi /path/to/backup is fine, however personally I'd suggest to use tar: sudo tar cfz /path/to/backup/ESP_backup.tar.gz /boot/efi); The filesystem in which to store the backup is irrelevant; the only concern might be the permissions, but the UEFI firmware doesn't cater for Linux permissions (...


4

Yes. I have three users including the admin. All gets backed up in an internal hard drive in separate folders. Each user has to setup Deja Dup from their own account. Backup will only happen if and when the user is logged on. I don't have any experience using Deja Dup with an external hard drive. You may have to make sure your other user has the read/...


4

To set up the cronjob for yr present non-root user, do in terminal: $ crontab -e The above will open yr (non-root) user's crontab with his/her default editor. Alternatively, to do so for the root crontab, but with yr present (presumably non-root) user environment parameters (default editor, etc.): $ sudo -i crontab -e In yr opened crontab, enter a new ...


4

If you are ready to use CLI, the following command should work for you: diff --brief -r backup/ documents/ This will show you the files that are unique to each folder. If you want you can also ignore filename cases with the --ignore-file-name-case As an example: ron@ron:~/test$ ls backup/ file1 file2 file3 file4 file5 ron@ron:~/test$ ls documents/ ...


3

It will work. Look at man rsync and the --update option. If you use -u it will totally skip files that have a newer timestamp on the destination. If you don't use -u it will checksum the files and sync them if there's a difference (there will be in your case). So don't use -u in your rsync invocation. Also, why not try to be empirical? Instead of just ...


3

".bak" is a filename extension commonly used to signify a backup copy of a file. - Wikipedia To restore this backup file : Delete the interface file with the broken settings. Remove .bak of the interfaces.bak file.


3

Well, I know that this is an old post, but I was just now able to fix this problem for myself, so I thought I will leave a comment here. When I tried to backup my data today, deja-dup almost completed the backup but finally during verification gave an error, saying that the data is corrupted and backup must be deleted. In retrospect, I remembered that I had ...


3

Instead of using dconf-editor to edit dconf, you can use gsettings from command line. See all the options (keys) within the Deja-Dup schema, and their configurations: gsettings list-recursively org.gnome.DejaDup Edit keys: gsettings set SCHEMA [:PATH] KEY VALUE For example: gsettings set org.gnome.DejaDup include-list ['$HOME']


3

I just checked in the image folder, the largest files in there have the extensions "gz.aa", "gz.ab" and "gz.ac", which I think is a compressed format, right? The partition I cloned had very few media files in it. It contained mostly system files and installed software. since it was my Ubuntu partition. So I guess this seems that compression was indeed used ...


3

The most useful backup application I've seen is called Aptik - all you need is a backup directory, stored locally or in the cloud. Aptik will backup PPAs, downloaded packages, software selections, application settings and themes and icons. Very useful. You can install it through the ppa: sudo apt-add-repository –y ppa:teejee2008/ppa sudo apt-get update ...


3

go to the location and run the command cd /var/www/html tar cvf /home/jo/backup/testBackup.tar test


3

Your script works for me (with the directories changed to directories that exist on my computers); I'm also using rsync 3.1.0 on Ubuntu 14.04. Note that --backup-dir is used to give a backup directory on the receiving end, so you probably want --backup-dir=/home/mcocdawc/PowerFolders/Molcas_project/.MIL53_backup instead.


3

The folder ~/.thunderbird includes everything you need. It includes emails, accounts, settings, (email-) passwords etc. If you simply backup the folder regularly, you can simply copy it back to your newly installed system, into ~/ (which is your home directory, /home/yourname). Even the installed extensions, add-ons etc. will be available instantly in most ...


3

Remember that VFAT/FAT32/FAT16/et al... Microsoft's glorious filesystem, only stores file times with a minimum resolution of 2 seconds. Meaning that if your source file has a mtime of 13:35:47, VFAT will save it as 13:35:46. Meaning your source file will always be newer. The cp command has no mechanism to deal with MS's weirdness, files will always be ...


3

No, you cannot do this with gedit. This was a declined feature request. It can apparently be done with a plugin, but such a plugin is not published - not that I can find, anyway,


2

ps aux | grep deja kill <pid of "deja-dup --backup --auto"> Immediately the backup button becomes active. This should be reported as a bug as the frontend should either have a button to terminate running backups or automatically reconcile concurrent backups.


2

loop module max_part config loop is a kernel module, built into the kernel in Ubuntu 14.04. If you configure it right, Linux automatically splits up the devices for you. cat /sys/module/loop/parameters/max_part says how many partitions loop devices can generate. It is 0 by default on Ubuntu 14.04 which is why no auto-splitting happens. To change it, ...



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