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19

1. I don't have a computer! Indeed! The forgotten masses of Ubuntu! Well, not forgotten here... ;-) The others might wonder, but you and I know: You might not have the big bucks to buy your own computer, but you've got your own personal computer safely tucked away on your USB stick/pen drive/SD Card/external HDD or even just simply your phone/tablet... ...


7

I've been doing this for years. I'm writing now from a PC which does not even contain an internal hard drive. I don't even carry a laptop, just this high performance USB flash media. I will now outline the two components you need to buy if you want decent performance. Most flash drives are too slow for most people, and they can also become unstable due to ...


6

In Linux everything is a file (That does not mean you can back them up) Technically everything is not files (I am no expert). However, some folders are special in the sense that they are not real folders. /proc is just one of them. It is a virtual file system that contains runtime file information. In other words, its contents keep changing as the system ...


6

For the people that don't know, MEGA is a Dropbox alternative, with 50GB of free storage, available for Mac, Windows and Linux, created by Kim Dotcom. I have been using Mega for months now, and it has turned into my new default Cloud Storage Service. Although some features are not present, such as, file previewer for Document files(.doc/.pdf/.txt). Image ...


6

Download the ignorelist to /var/tmp/ignorelist wget http://git.io/vmQZ2 -O /var/tmp/ignorelist Then start the rsync with rsync -aP --exclude-from=/var/tmp/ignorelist /home/$USER/ /media/$USER/linuxbackup/home/


5

4. My computer is my life! The reason you bought the computer in the first place, is... Well, the computer! You tinker, you theme, you customise, you get it just right! But is it right for a back-up? What if that last theme of yours stops you from logging into the desktop? Or that custom kernel you just downloaded freezes grub? How to install Ubuntu: ...


5

Create some scripts sudo nano /usr/local/bin/rsync_html #!/bin/bash /usr/bin/rsync -av --delete /var/www/html /media/stan/Seagate\ Expansion\ Drive/backups/ sudo nano /usr/local/bin/rsync_documents #!/bin/bash /usr/bin/rsync -av --delete /home/stan/documents /media/stan/Seagate\ Expansion\ Drive/backups/ sudo nano /usr/local/bin/rsync_backups ...


4

It does not matter. Because if you install and run the software after restoring back, the software will start using config files right away, because those files came from restore. but when you install software and then restore the config files will be overwritten. You will be back when you made the backup. if you do this way, make sure you have closed all ...


4

The script below is an opposite- variant of this script; while that one acts on specified drives, this scripts acts on all except specified (usb) drives. What it does Whenever an external usb storage device is being connected, the script copies its content into a directory, defined by you (in the head section of the script: target_folder =). A sub ...


4

I fix this problem by myself. The deja-dup-monitor is a component of "Deja Dup Backup Tool". When search with keyword "backup", this software appears blatantly in the first place in the Software Center. After uninstalling it, everything will return to order. I then reinstalled this software just to leave a review warning people not to install it, if they ...


4

First of all, if your drive is experiencing I/O errors you should check if your drive is healthy enough. I/O errors might be localized only on a/some specific bad block/bad blocks, but having one/some is how a drive failure usually starts. You can use smartctl to check your drive's S.M.A.R.T. status, which provides many informations about the drive's ...


4

This should be possible; your flash drive just needs to have enough memory for the OS and whatever files you'll be using. The limitations are based on the flash drive and/or the computer you run it (but most likely the read/write speed of the flash drive will have a larger impact on speed). The stick is used as memory similar to any other harddrive in a ...


4

Since everything is working fine from the command line, the error Permission denied (publickey) means that the SSH part of rsync is using a different identity file than the specified username. From Jan's comment on the original question, we can specify the identity file in the rsync command using -e 'ssh -i /path/to/identity.file' .... Using the below ...


4

The line with DROPBOX="/root/Dropbox/Backups does not have a " at the end. The MYSQL, MYSQLDUMP and GZIP variables refer to the programs used to execute various commands. So they should contain the path of those programs: MYSQL="/usr/bin/mysql" MYSQLDUMP="/usr/bin/mysqldump" GZIP="/bin/gzip" You can use the output of which <program name> to see ...


4

Actually, it seems to be a commercial decision. See: https://help.backblaze.com/entries/20203476-Is-Backblaze-going-to-offer-Linux-support-


4

You could simply use dd to dump your partition into a file, like so: sudo dd if=/dev/sda1 of=dump.img Then you can easily restore it by running the following command from a live DVD / USB stick: sudo dd if=dump.img of=/dev/sda1 Replace /dev/sda1 with your root partition. Obviously, you will need to place the dump file to another partition. Another ...


4

No, there is no single command to do what you are asking. Why? This is the Unix philosophy: Write programs that do one thing and do it well. Write programs to work together.1 In this instance, the mkdir and rm commands do what you require, and work well together, since rm -r will delete the directory as well, so a subsequent mkdir will create ...


4

If your goal is to execute a one-line command that: Removes and recreates the directory ~/Desktop/foo if it already exists. Just creates the directory ~/Desktop/foo if it does not already exist. Then you can use: rm -r ~/Desktop/foo; mkdir ~/Desktop/foo ; is equivalent to a newline, but it lets you execute multiple commands on a single line (i.e., as ...


3

If you haven't made any significant modifications, copying the skeleton bashrc is enough. It doesn't affect the boot or GUI login process.


3

Sure. These instructions are for a fresh ubuntu install. Open Déjà Dup. Search the dash for deja. Click on the big “Restore” button. A dialog will appear asking where your backup files are stored (your “Backup location”). Choose “Other…” and navigate to the folder of backups. On this same screen, select whether you encrypted the backup or not. Click ...


3

It's a bug in libpam-smbpass. You can get rid of it, the only thing it does is that it forces sync between the samba and unix password on login: sudo apt-get remove libpam-smbpass sudo service netatalk restart And you're golden again.


3

For Owncloud 6 & 7 the above path did not work, the folder needs to be: /<owncloud prefix>/remote.php/files/<backup folder>


3

It is adviced to make TWO backups. 1 for / and 1 for /home if they are on different partition. If you want one you will have to add a lot of exceptions to that one command. Example: sudo su cd / tar -cvpzf backup.tar.gz --exclude=/backup.tar.gz --one-file-system / tar -cvpzf backuphome.tar.gz --one-file-system /home/ will backup your root and exclude ALL ...


3

Yes, that approach is as save as any normal use of sudo. When you use sudo, the password is cached, in the default configuration. And you use a dummy command to put the password into that standard cache, by a command doing nothing, as root - which is certainly not dangerous. sudoonly Because your example uses mysqldump, which also uses a password, I'd ...


3

Just modify the command. The actual command is juju backup create. It will definitely work.


3

Many many folders are affected when installing software. For a complete picture see How to understand the Ubuntu file system layout? Directories you will need are /bin/, /sbin/, /usr/, /etc/, /var/ , /lib/, /home/, /opt/ (3rd party software goes to /opt/; might be empty). /boot/ might be needed too depending on what you install. I would reconsider if I was ...


3

Grsync is meant as a GUI to rsync. You can use it also very easily to "compose" The command, to use on startup (e.g. if you are unsure how to create the rsync command): in Grsync, choose source and destination, as well as your options: Choose "File" > "Command line": A window will popup with the command you are looking for: Copy the command you ...


3

As long as you ensure you install the bootloaded (grub) on the hard disk you're installing Ubuntu on, there is absolutely no problem!) I've even installed Ubuntu on an external hard drive on my own machine and then moved that to the internal hard drive of another machine multiple times and it just works (unlike Windows)


3

You are using the -x option, so I'm going to guess /home is on a separate partition. From man rsync: -x, --one-file-system don't cross filesystem boundaries


3

This is how I would back up secure data like this. I'm assuming because you're using ssh keys that you're comfortable on the command line. Move all the keys to a single folder. Make a tar archive of that folder. tar -cf keys.tar /path/to/keys/folder Then I'd encrypt the tar file with OpenSSL, using the command openssl aes-256-cbc -a -in keys.tar -out ...



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