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7

You can keep the NTFS partition with your files, if you have enough free space. Just shrink the NTFS partition, install Ubuntu, then copy your files to an Ubuntu partition. After that you will be able to safely remove the NTFS partition and expand Ubuntu partition(s). That is one of the ways not involving external storage.


7

You can use Clonezilla to backup the whole system in its current state. Download the ISO and create a bootable media (CD/DVD/USB) from it. Boot from the media and save the whole disk or single partitions to another disk. If you want to restore the image - boot from the media again and start restoring. Comprehensive information on how to exactly do this ...


6

You can just copy everything inside it (i.e. e.g. sudo cp -R /boot/efi /path/to/backup is fine, however personally I'd suggest to use tar: sudo tar cfz /path/to/backup/ESP_backup.tar.gz /boot/efi); The filesystem in which to store the backup is irrelevant; the only concern might be the permissions, but the UEFI firmware doesn't cater for Linux permissions ...


6

5. I want the fastest possible restore!If speed of recovery and having everything exactly the way it was when you backed up is more important than the space the backup contains you can backup every drive using dd or dc3dd to create image file(s). dc3dd is preferred over dd as it provides a progress indicator. Place the image file(s) on a drive that is large ...


6

In Linux everything is a file (That does not mean you can back them up) Technically everything is not files (I am no expert). However, some folders are special in the sense that they are not real folders. /proc is just one of them. It is a virtual file system that contains runtime file information. In other words, its contents keep changing as the system ...


5

This problem impacts the underlying backend software, duplicity as well as deja dup. I filed a bug report for duplicity, which has now both confirmed the bug and issued a patch, see: https://bugs.launchpad.net/duplicity/+bug/1453232 This bug affects duplicity version 0.7.01 and is fixed in 0.7.02.


5

Depending on your use-case (I use it to make system back-ups) you can use CloneZilla. It can not only create sparse, but also compressed images of entire drives or individual partitions. The main advantages is that it comes with its own OS (based on Ubuntu) so that it can make exact cold system back-ups that are easily restored. On top of all these ...


5

We have a GUI available in Ubuntu, called 'Disks' (gnome-disk-utility) and comes default in later Ubuntu. Or sudo apt-get install gnome-disk-utility


5

The standards fonts directories are: /usr/share/fonts, /usr/local/share/fonts, and ~/.fonts. You backup those directories, then when you've restored the contents run: sudo fc-cache -f -v and your fonts will be available to your system [edit] you can also use fc-list to list all installed font before the backup


5

Create some scripts sudo nano /usr/local/bin/rsync_html #!/bin/bash /usr/bin/rsync -av --delete /var/www/html /media/stan/Seagate\ Expansion\ Drive/backups/ sudo nano /usr/local/bin/rsync_documents #!/bin/bash /usr/bin/rsync -av --delete /home/stan/documents /media/stan/Seagate\ Expansion\ Drive/backups/ sudo nano /usr/local/bin/rsync_backups ...


5

".bak" is a filename extension commonly used to signify a backup copy of a file. - Wikipedia To restore this backup file : Delete the interface file with the broken settings. Remove .bak of the interfaces.bak file.


4

When you ask multiple questions, you need to find one expert versed in multiple areas which becomes more unlikely the more questions you put into... well, one question! ;-) However, someone asked me to help you out, so I'll go for it: Use NTFS: none of the fuss, all of the advantages (for a certain definition of fuss ) Just use CloneZilla, but read its ...


4

Aptik After seeing the various answers here (and not disagreeing with any of them) it strikes me that you asked for simplicity. In my comment, I linked to an application called Aptik and I'm going to show you why I think this meets your criteria best. Aptik is simple to install and trivially easy to use. It is also a handy dandy GUI (Graphical User ...


4

Attic Backup Attic is a deduplicating backup program written in Python. The main goal of Attic is to provide an efficient and secure way to backup data. The data deduplication technique used makes Attic suitable for daily backups since only the changes are stored. Main Features: Easy to use Space efficient storage: Variable block size ...


4

Achieving smaller disk images is usually done by ways of not copying zero outed blocks from the initial file system in the image. The concept is called sparse space in files or puching holes in files, and your host file system has to support it. a bit command line but try this: sudo apt-get install virt-manager qemu-utils And then once it's install you ...


4

Global issues: Use indentation. It makes your code more readable (for you and for us). Use only straight quotes in bash. Other types of quotes might break commands. Do not append ; at the end of a single command. The ; character has a specific meaning and it's useless if appended to a single command. Specific issues: fdisk -l; You need to run fdisk as ...


4

The only solution I am aware of is pixz (sudo apt-get install pixz), a variant of xz using a blocked encoder which allows for fast random acccess/indexing. Additionally, it is a parallel method using multiple cores for compression. Citing the docs: The existing XZ Utils ( http://tukaani.org/xz/ ) provide great compression in the .xz file format, but ...


4

First of all, if your drive is experiencing I/O errors you should check if your drive is healthy enough. I/O errors might be localized only on a/some specific bad block/bad blocks, but having one/some is how a drive failure usually starts. You can use smartctl to check your drive's S.M.A.R.T. status, which provides many informations about the drive's ...


4

You need to pass the command components as elements of a list, so you can add tar to the TAR_CMD variable and then use split(' ') to create a list of command components separated on spaces: TAR_CMD='tar .....' subprocess.call(TAR_CMD.split(' ')) Or directly: subprocess.call('tar ....'.split(' '))


3

No, you cannot do this with gedit. This was a declined feature request. It can apparently be done with a plugin, but such a plugin is not published - not that I can find, anyway,


3

Remember that VFAT/FAT32/FAT16/et al... Microsoft's glorious filesystem, only stores file times with a minimum resolution of 2 seconds. Meaning that if your source file has a mtime of 13:35:47, VFAT will save it as 13:35:46. Meaning your source file will always be newer. The cp command has no mechanism to deal with MS's weirdness, files will always be ...


3

The folder ~/.thunderbird includes everything you need. It includes emails, accounts, settings, (email-) passwords etc. If you simply backup the folder regularly, you can simply copy it back to your newly installed system, into ~/ (which is your home directory, /home/yourname). Even the installed extensions, add-ons etc. will be available instantly in most ...


3

You are using the -x option, so I'm going to guess /home is on a separate partition. From man rsync: -x, --one-file-system don't cross filesystem boundaries


3

As long as you ensure you install the bootloaded (grub) on the hard disk you're installing Ubuntu on, there is absolutely no problem!) I've even installed Ubuntu on an external hard drive on my own machine and then moved that to the internal hard drive of another machine multiple times and it just works (unlike Windows)


3

Deja Dup (the name of the default backup program in Ubuntu) will ignore its own backup folder, where it keeps the backup files. There should be no looping. It does this automatically, you don't need to add it to your list of folders to ignore during a backup.


3

This is how I would back up secure data like this. I'm assuming because you're using ssh keys that you're comfortable on the command line. Move all the keys to a single folder. Make a tar archive of that folder. tar -cf keys.tar /path/to/keys/folder Then I'd encrypt the tar file with OpenSSL, using the command openssl aes-256-cbc -a -in keys.tar -out ...


3

Edit: This will not work well if files deleted from the filesystem are still present on the partition, so first it's necessary to wipe the free space on the target partition: Mount the target partition Run dd if=/dev/zero of=<path_to_partition_volume>/file.dd && rm <path_to_partition_volume>/file.dd Unmount the target partition Then: ...


3

Open deja-dup-preferences from terminal as a different user. su - or su backupuser deja-dup-preferences Make the required source, destination and other settings. In Startup Applications Preferences of you general user, add below command to autobackup when you login to your general user. sudo -u backupuser -s deja-dup --backup


3

My backup sets currently contain /var (except /var/run, /var/cache, /var/tmp) /srv /etc /root /home /usr (/usr/local only, nothing else) Note this is for a server, so backing up things like /etc saves all my configuration for my services, I have web servers in /srv (though if you have them in /var/www, they would still be in this backup set), I have ...


3

If I reinstall my desktop system, I backup /etc /var, I'm too lazy to exclude some sub-folders /opt /home is on a separate partition and has a backup made every day. After the reinstall, I restore the parts from my backup, which I really need. With this strategy, all my configurations, local mails and crontab configurations are safe and I have to ...



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