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45

The following is a list of the cloud services similar to Ubuntu One that work in Ubuntu (Can be installed with a .DEB file) and may provide support for the Unity Systray: Dropbox Website - https://www.dropbox.com/ Starting Free Space - 2 GB Bonus Space - 25 GB to 50 GB when used on an Smartphone Characteristics - Sync Files/Folders between devices. Unity ...


8

I suspect you just don't have access to them from the user that is running this script. Look at the file ownerships: $ ls -l /var/log/{dmesg,syslog,message} ls: cannot access /var/log/message: No such file or directory -rw-r----- 1 root adm 86384 Mar 9 11:12 /var/log/dmesg -rw-r----- 1 syslog adm 18553 Mar 25 13:25 /var/log/syslog You could read from ...


5

If you copy a partition with dd, the output file will be as big as the partition. dd does a physical copy of the disc, it has no knowledge of blank or used space. If you compress the result file you will save a lot of space, though, given that blank space will compress away very well (beware, this is going to be computationally very heavy). You can ...


5

If you also have unwanted backup files in subfolders, it gets a bit more difficult: find . -type f -name '*~' -delete


5

EDIT: There are two more detailed articles on Launchpad FAQ on how to backup and restore package selections. Yes. This will work. Make sure you have included everything that is important to you in your last snapshot. Run this commands to backup your PPA's and package selection: mkdir ~/.apt-backup sudo dpkg --get-selections > ...


4

If you wanted a root gedit to not create backups then simply disable in root's gsettings (editing root's gsettings should be done with care & in only some limited places). sudo -i then gsettings set org.gnome.gedit.preferences.editor create-backup-copy false Note that starting in 13.10, I'd probably stick to gksudo gedit or just use a cli editor ...


4

You most probably don't have read permissions for /var/log/{dmesg,syslog,message}. So even though you have the files created on your destkop, they will be empty, since nothing was read but an attempt to write was made to a file(the one created on your desktop). So you have two options: Get read permissions for /var/log/{dmesg,syslog,message} as follows: ...


4

Your problem is the following lines of your script : echo ' ' > /var/log/dmesg echo ' ' > /var/log/syslog echo ' ' > /var/log/message Unsurprisingly, since those are precisely lines 7,8 and 9 which are the ones that bash is complaining about. These commands are attempting to delete the contents of those 3 log files in /var/log but since they are ...


4

Watch the ordering. The -f option represents the file, and it should be immediately followed by the file name. The proper command here is tar -xvzf files.tgz.


4

If your goal is to execute a one-line command that: Removes and recreates the directory ~/Desktop/foo if it already exists. Just creates the directory ~/Desktop/foo if it does not already exist. Then you can use: rm -r ~/Desktop/foo; mkdir ~/Desktop/foo ; is equivalent to a newline, but it lets you execute multiple commands on a single line (i.e., as ...


3

If you haven't made any significant modifications, copying the skeleton bashrc is enough. It doesn't affect the boot or GUI login process.


3

The line with DROPBOX="/root/Dropbox/Backups does not have a " at the end. The MYSQL, MYSQLDUMP and GZIP variables refer to the programs used to execute various commands. So they should contain the path of those programs: MYSQL="/usr/bin/mysql" MYSQLDUMP="/usr/bin/mysqldump" GZIP="/bin/gzip" You can use the output of which <program name> to see ...


3

No, there is no single command to do what you are asking. Why? This is the Unix philosophy: Write programs that do one thing and do it well. Write programs to work together.1 In this instance, the mkdir and rm commands do what you require, and work well together, since rm -r will delete the directory as well, so a subsequent mkdir will create ...


3

Set DEJA_DUP_DEBUG=1 like so on the command line: DEJA_DUP_DEBUG=1 deja-dup --backup


3

Don't rely on the dependence system, because it may change in future updates. The correct procedure to follow is to change runlevel and go in Single User Mode with an init sequence (official MAN link). The system will terminate the services in the correct order for you. Open a virtual terminal (CTRL+ALT+Fn) and gain root privileges with su or sudo su (last ...


3

Use: sudo dd if=/dev/sdX of=/dev/sdY to copy the contents of /dev/sdX to /dev/sdY.


3

I suggest you following two ways. First. To modify /home/servershare/networkbackup folder's permission. $ sudo chown -R servershare:servershare /home/servershare/networkbackup $ ./prod1backup.sh Second. To use sudo command directly. $ sudo ./prod1backup.sh I think that "Permission denied" is shown, because it folder's owner is not current user.


3

Use duplicity to extract it: duplicity restore file:///path_to_folder_contains_backups/ path_where_to_extract_it/ Enter GnuPG passphrase, Press Enter By default, Duplicity restores last backup (comparing time) in the source folder even its not the backup for the same folder. If you have multiple backups for different folders or you want specific time of ...


3

What I want to know is can I view the Windows backed up files in Ubuntu and then select the ones I need to restore? No / doubt it. These backups tend to be created for that specific program in Windows and have some form of encryption or compression. You need to restore the files you want in Windows and then copy them over to Ubuntu. For example, I ...


3

No matter what, always backup your data. If you switch os and do not have a separate data partition, you will lose everything that is on your disk, you will have to copy it back after installation. Then the next thing is to decide how you would want your disk to be partitioned; as one big partition + a swap area, or a separate data partition to hold your ...


3

Yes that’s correct when restoring backups you can chose where and which folder or files you will restore. You can restore backup as whole or part of it. When restoring you can restore to any place you point Déjà Dup. So, yes you would be able to bring your data up from the folder created by the backup


3

You can use Deja-dup for this. If you want to just backup all of your files, then you just have to set Deja-dup to backup your entire system. Make sure the Deja-dup does not backup your backup location or it will run into problems. If you are backing up to an external hard drive it will probably be mounted under /media/$USER. I would recommend creating a ...


3

Use clonezilla on live CD/USB, its free and powerful. With this you'll be able to fully backup/restore disks/partitions including OS, userdata, etc.. Check : http://clonezilla.org/ Follow this to use : http://clonezilla.org/clonezilla-live.php#use


3

Your external drive is using either FAT32 or NTFS, which do not support permissions. You either need to switch to a unix compatible format on the external drive, or you can use tar ( or the gui archive utility ) to preserve the correct permissions in the archive while it is stored on such a disk.


3

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 * 2048 484491263 242244608 83 Linux 1 block is 512 bytes. 242244608 blocks is 115.5 GiB, not 24 as you mentioned. The dd command (refered by you as "imaging") keeps writing data to the same partition that you are cloning. This does not cause any loops, but it may yield ...


3

The question is a bit generic, so the answer is a bit generic, too: yes, probably. Most applications save their settings either in a hidden subdirectory of your home directory named after the application, e.g. ~/.thunderbird, in a directory in ~/.config/, e.g. ~/.config/evolution, or in a hidden file in your home directory, again named after the ...


3

If you have never used the firefox option Bookmarks->Show All Bookmarks-> Import and Backup -> Export Bookmarks to HTML, then you will never see a file, bookmarks.html. In such a case, you can probably copy over the history files stored in ~/.mozilla/firefox/xxxxxxxx.default/bookmarkbackups/ where xxxxxxxx.default is a FF assigned directory. And then, ...


3

Well, I just used usb stick + ubuntu live. I was transferring ubuntu 13.10 from larger hdd to a smaller ssd, and clonezilla "said" that it can't be done this way since target partition is smaller than the source partition. So I started ubuntu live, mounted both hdd's (new disk, was partitioned earlier of course, don't forget about swap ;) ), and just: cd ...


2

There is a software for Linux called Timeshift exactly for this purpose. Using Timeshift you can take snapshots of your Linux system regularly and restore them whenever you need. This software brings System Restore feature of Windows to your Linux distribution. A short description from its official website: TimeShift for Linux is a application that ...


2

Ubuntu One no longer exists, so yes you need another backup plan.



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