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4

It does not matter. Because if you install and run the software after restoring back, the software will start using config files right away, because those files came from restore. but when you install software and then restore the config files will be overwritten. You will be back when you made the backup. if you do this way, make sure you have closed all ...


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The script below is an opposite- variant of this script; while that one acts on specified drives, this scripts acts on all except specified (usb) drives. What it does Whenever an external usb storage device is being connected, the script copies its content into a directory, defined by you (in the head section of the script: target_folder =). A sub ...


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Many many folders are affected when installing software. For a complete picture see How to understand the Ubuntu file system layout? Directories you will need are /bin/, /sbin/, /usr/, /etc/, /var/ , /lib/, /home/, /opt/ (3rd party software goes to /opt/; might be empty). /boot/ might be needed too depending on what you install. I would reconsider if I was ...


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You need not copy the entire contents of the USB drive. Just copy the casper-rw file to the computer as a backup. casper-rw is the name of the file where the Live USB stores persistent information. The next time you need to create a USB drive with the same settings and applications, create a live USB using uNetbootin or any other program and copy your ...


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In linux, all your userdata is stored in you home, e. g. /home/user. It's explained : here. For BfW, there is an entry in the wiki. I guess, if you copy ~/.local/share/wesnoth/, it should work.


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The file list of the ukopp package indicates it is located at /usr/share/ukopp/data/userguide-en.html on your system.


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Have you considered CrashPlan? They support Linux (I'm running it from my Ubuntu 14.04 server) and they offer unlimited storage for a reasonable cost. If you're in the USA they also have the option of shipping a seed drive so you don't have to upload that 1 TB of initial backup. They have 2 encryption options, one where your account password is your ...


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The files in /dev/ folder are special, in a way that they represent devices on the machine, and are not regular files that have content in them. That file probably represents a flash drive you plugged in to your computer, or a USB bus. If it's a USB flash drive, mounting it first, then copying it's contents will do the trick. You could also try backing up ...


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It sounds to me like what you are wanting to achieve is exactly the way BackupPC works. See http://backuppc.sourceforge.net/ You can install it in Ubuntu using sudo apt-get install backuppc Note however that the default install doesn't do anything on its own. You will have to create configuration files for each machine and/or directory you want backed ...


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In the default mode of operation rsync uses the modification time as key to determine whether a file should be transferred or not. From its manual page: Rsync finds files that need to be transferred using a "quick check" algorithm (by default) that looks for files that have changed in size or in last-modified time. Using the --checksums option, ...


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A closer study has revealed the root cause of my problem: the receiving file system was not case-sensitive, and the files in question all had identical names in all but the extension, like this: 2873603 Oct 20 2009 R1.JPG 2180728 Oct 20 2009 R1.jpg 2814276 Oct 20 2009 R2.JPG 3150011 Oct 20 2009 R2.jpg There seems to be a working general solution to ...


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Check the "delete on destination" checkbox in the "basic options" tab. It's like specifying the -d option in rsync which will delete files and folders that are not on the source disk.


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The best solution would be to setup everyting again on the server and copy only the "production data". (You should document your setup, so that you can recreate it whenever necessary and only need backups for restoring production data.) Restoring parts of an operating system to another existing system is a bad idea and will result in inconsistencies. For ...


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You should declare --one-file-system first before the exclusion rule. There is note from the same guide you followed. If you want to exclude all other mounts other than the current - by this I mean partitions mounted to directories - then use the --one-file-system option appended before the exclusion rules. This has the effect of stopping tar from ...


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I would advise Unison (unison-gtk ) This is a graphical sync program, and can be installed via the Software Centre, but the easiest way to install is via the terminal: sudo apt-get install unison unison-gtk Then it will be in the dash, search for unison. You can create profiles and such like to sync locally between USBs and remotely via SSH. The best ...


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You can have a look at Remastersys. Although its development is no longer taking place, you can still download it from here and install the deb file using dpkg. sudo dpkg -i <filename>.deb It can be used to create custom bootable ISOs (LiveCD) which can be customised according to the user's preference in terms of the packages installed, themes, etc. ...



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