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4

First of all, if your drive is experiencing I/O errors you should check if your drive is healthy enough. I/O errors might be localized only on a/some specific bad block/bad blocks, but having one/some is how a drive failure usually starts. You can use smartctl to check your drive's S.M.A.R.T. status, which provides many informations about the drive's ...


3

You are using the -x option, so I'm going to guess /home is on a separate partition. From man rsync: -x, --one-file-system don't cross filesystem boundaries


3

This is how I would back up secure data like this. I'm assuming because you're using ssh keys that you're comfortable on the command line. Move all the keys to a single folder. Make a tar archive of that folder. tar -cf keys.tar /path/to/keys/folder Then I'd encrypt the tar file with OpenSSL, using the command openssl aes-256-cbc -a -in keys.tar -out ...


2

In order to avoid filesystem corruption, you need to run dd from a Live CD/USB. This ensures that the filesystem you copy does not change while dd copies it.


2

Any files you move on your drives using the live cd will be moved on these drives. In other words, these files are "moved in windows as well" to use your words. There are a few things that you want to go about carefully, though: Copy rather than cut your files. If something is wrong with the harddrive you might lose files while cutting. Make sure you ...


2

First off, make sure you backup everything you've got on the Windows partitions. I would then suggest trying gparted. It might let you remove the existing Windows partitions and expand the Ubuntu partitions without losing any data (depending on how the partitions are laid out).


1

It's probably because of different filesystems used. For example, Ubuntu uses ext4 by default, while USB drives generally use FAT32 and Windows uses NTFS. ext4 has some unallowed charcters: NUL (\0), / and the special file names . and .. (Wikipedia). The reason / is unallowed is because it's used for directories, and ext4 would probably get confused between ...


1

Just in case someone else needs help. This software does the job and more 'systemback' http://sourceforge.net/projects/systemback/ You dont need to install remastersys or pay for Black Lab Image creator. It's a very well design application and works great on 14.04 To install, open the terminal and do: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nemh/systemback sudo ...


1

I've taken a somewhat different and perhaps incompatible approach to yours. Rather than save the btrfs send stream with -f, I always btrfs receive to reproduce the snapshot on the backup media (also a btrfs filesystem). Additionally, all snapshots are indistinguishable from each other - there is no difference between monthlies, daylies, hourlies etc. - they ...


1

first install xdotool if you didn't do yet. sudo apt-get install xdotool Now specify the PID of the deja-dup backup process. ps aux | grep deja user 32052 18.5 0.1 1166992 33240 ? Sl 13:31 0:00 gnome-control-center deja-dup user 32073 11.5 0.0 744364 19704 ? SNl 13:31 0:00 deja-dup --backup user 32100 0.0 0.0 9452 944 pts/2 ...


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That feature isn't supported by Deja Dup. It IS supported by the underlying duplicity command line tool though. See duplicity's man page for help using it.


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It's fine to include such directories in a backup as long as your user can READ the files (users can often, but not always, read root-owned files). But if your user can't read the files, I recommend running duplicity directly via cron. Deja Dup is designed for users, not system administrators.


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Make a test folder such as usbmount under /: sudo mkdir /usbmount and change UUID=E89AF5299AF4F542 /usbmount ntfs defaults,users 0 0 and sudo reboot or sudo mount -a In a nutshell avoid these kind of strings such as /media/username/f6c682f3-5271-4f2b-99e8-93aa3bd39990/ in fstab previously i had such a bad experience with such strings i.e samba ...


1

I see a problem with your commands: /dev/sdg1 in the 1st error. /dev/sdf in the 2nd error. g-io-error-quark, 19 means "Method name you invoked isn’t known by the object you invoked it on." So I would assume your 1st command has an invalid device and it should be /dev/sdf1. Regarding the superblock error: start here and read the link in post 2 So how ...


1

First you have to execlude .gvfs if GVFS is installed. rsync -vaxE --progress --delete --log-file='./rsync-log' --exclude={"/home/*/.gvfs"} / /media/me/Backup/ Or if you use /home as separate partition then remove -x option rsync -vaE --progress --delete --log-file='./rsync-log' --exclude={"/home/*/.gvfs"} / /media/me/Backup/


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Your GPG secret keyring is already encrypted, though it's only as strong as your passphrase (which is true of any encryption). I'd make a tar file of all the files you want to backup (a few folders/files listed to tar, or with -T, --files-from get names to extract or create from FILE) and pipe tar's output to GPG. Basically: tar -c folder | gpg --output ...


1

From the deja dup page: Duplicity Déjà Dup is really just a clever graphical wrapper around the command line backup tool duplicity. You can read more about it on its homepage, but basically, it uses rsync to generate incremental, encrypted backup volumes. Scheduling Déjà Dup does not use cron or similar schedulers. Rather, it starts ...



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