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2

In short, yes. You may need to re-register and/or re-import the private keys from these locations, but you can do that after installing the respective tools. However, you should make sure that you actually backed up the private keys and that they're valid. md5summing is good enough for this.


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It's a normal file so you can cp top create a backup sudo cp /etc/mysql/my.cnf /etc/mysql/my.cnf.backup and restore it sudo cp /etc/mysql/my.cnf.backup /etc/mysql/my.cnf You may use whatever file name and path you want instead of /etc/mysql/my.cnf.backup


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I could solve this by removing writing right from the dummy mount point folder. This way, copying files fails if mounting was not successful.


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It should be as simple as making a copy of the file. Then, if something goes wrong, you can just delete your modified file and rename the copy. I would do: sudo cp /etc/mysql/my.cnf /etc/mysql/my.cnf.bak then: sudo nano /etc/mysql/my.cnf To restore: sudo rm /etc/mysql/my.cnf sudo mv /etc/mysql/my.cnf.bak /etc/mysql/my.cnf


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This is almost certainly an unneeded file as the naming convention for the map files in /boot is as follows: andrew@athens:~$ ls /boot | grep -E *map* System.map-4.4.0-15-generic System.map-4.4.0-22-generic Test this on your own system, this is on Xenial Xerus 16.04. The file can be safely left in place but if you are at all worried simply back the file ...


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Backing Up To get started, please open up a terminal, in Ubuntu this can be done by Ctrl + Alt + T Some directories require root or superuser permissions to read and write (needed for backup). For that just execute the following sudo su Then Type in your password. You need to have an Administrator privileged account. For this example, we will change ...


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Looked like you previously had some quotation issues. Using ascii quotes won't work well with code, use the standard coding quote (") instead. Ascii quotes come from word processors like libreoffice or abiword; don't use those programs for coding. Use something like gedit or leafpad. Also, are you putting this in /etc/crontab? If so, you need to add a user ...


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I need to back up my files on my external hard disk from the TTY. You can't do it precisely from the TTY because you destroyed your sudo ability and probably you won't be able to mount the external drive. However, you have two options: booting in a root shell using a live DVD or USB Backup booting in a root shell You cut yourself superuser powers, so ...


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Ubuntu has a built-in utility to do this! Simply search for "Backups" in the dash, and the app will pop up: Click on the icon to open it, and then you should see this: Simply adjust the settings to your liking, and do a backup.


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I would recommend to use a disk imaging tool like Clonezilla, which can backup the complete contents of your disk into an image, which can be stored on a USB drive, another disk, a network share, or even a writeable DVD. To use it, Download the current stable version, write the ISO to a DVD or USB stick, and boot it, and follow the instructions to create an ...


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I don't believe so. You'll have to upgrade 14.04 to 0.28 first, then backup the database, install 16.04 and then restore. It's possible that you can restore a 0.27 database to a 0.28 system and the backend will attempt to upgrade that when started, but I've not tested this.



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