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4

If you are ready to use CLI, the following command should work for you: diff --brief -r backup/ documents/ This will show you the files that are unique to each folder. If you want you can also ignore filename cases with the --ignore-file-name-case As an example: ron@ron:~/test$ ls backup/ file1 file2 file3 file4 file5 ron@ron:~/test$ ls documents/ ...


2

Yes, there is a very good way to make restore points using btrfs in Ubuntu. Standard Ubuntu installation with btrfs uses subvolumes @ for / and @home for /home. If you have installed Ubuntu in the default way with these subvolumes, then you can easily make restore points for / and /home separately. You can check if you have these subvolumes by running ...


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Yes the .img files should be restorable with dd but you can also do it from the disks tool itself if you are less confident with the command line. To restore using the disk tool , select the partition you want to restore to , click the cog and select 'restore partition image' If you are unsure about the type of a file you can check it using the 'file' ...


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Since nobody wrote an answer (despite bounty), I'm going to explain myself, how I finally solved this. muru's comment (thanks a lot!) was right and brought me on the right track: In Ubuntu 14.04, the Apache startup is managed by a sysv init script, and being a shell script it inherits everything (environment variables, open file descriptors, etc.), and the ...


2

For anybody curious I did solve this. First I determined that the charset on the old VFAT drive was ISO-8859-1 (very common for Windows). I then executed a rsync command with the option to convert the old charset to UTF-8 and that did the trick. Example: rsync -vaW --size-only --iconv=ISO-8859-1,utf-8 /media/Music/* '/media/username/Seagate Backup Plus ...


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Honestly, I've never heard of the program you're using. I personally prefer rsnapshot (http://rsnapshot.org/) for my backup needs. The Ubuntu package is the same name. Since it uses hardlinks, the first time it runs may use a lot of CPU time, but afterwards, it won't. (Especially if you have few files that change between backups -- which is the case for ...


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When you mount a partition to a directory, the partition's root directory will be mapped to the mount point directory. Example: sda1: / - bin/ - home/ sda2: / - user1/ - user2/ - MISC/ So sda1 is your root partition and you are now mounting sda2 to the mount point directory /home/. This will then result in a directory structure ...


1

The conflict has been caused by an invalid line in the /home/user/.gnupg/gpg.conf file. This particular line pinentry-program /usr/local/bin/pinentry-gtk-2 had been added by the user for Enigmail to work (troubleshooting item 'Resolving issues with GnuPG 2.x and gpg-agent') and had been worked like a charm for a long time. Apparently there must have been ...



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