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Grsync is meant as a GUI to rsync. You can use it also very easily to "compose" The command, to use on startup (e.g. if you are unsure how to create the rsync command): in Grsync, choose source and destination, as well as your options: Choose "File" > "Command line": A window will popup with the command you are looking for: Copy the command you ...


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First things first: /proc is a virtual filesystem. Do not back it up. Its contents do not exist on the disk. From man 5 proc: /proc/kcore This file represents the physical memory of the system and is stored in the ELF core file format. With this pseudo-file, and an unstripped kernel (/usr/src/linux/vmlinux) binary, GDB can be ...


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Open deja-dup-preferences from terminal as a different user. su - or su backupuser deja-dup-preferences Make the required source, destination and other settings. In Startup Applications Preferences of you general user, add below command to autobackup when you login to your general user. sudo -u backupuser -s deja-dup --backup


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Achieving smaller disk images is usually done by ways of not copying zero outed blocks from the initial file system in the image. The concept is called sparse space in files or puching holes in files, and your host file system has to support it. a bit command line but try this: sudo apt-get install virt-manager qemu-utils And then once it's install you ...


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Depending on your use-case (I use it to make system back-ups) you can use CloneZilla. It can not only create sparse, but also compressed images of entire drives or individual partitions. The main advantages is that it comes with its own OS (based on Ubuntu) so that it can make exact cold system back-ups that are easily restored. On top of all these ...


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How about using ddrescue with -S option? ddrescue -S /dev/sdXY /<path_to_backup>/backup.img This will clone each block but zero blocks found in block device /dev/sdXY to /<path_to_backup>/backup.img


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Edit: Forgot to say this might not work well if left-overs file deleted from the filesystem have not been wiped out from the source partition yet, so to make this method work at its best all of the time it's necessary to wipe the free space on the partition first (and therefore even tough all the procedure could be automated in a single shell script, other ...


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To my knowledge, there are no files in Ubuntu which store or are dependent on the physical characteristics of the hard drive. All the information about the partitions is stored in the MBR and other data structures, which are outside of any filesystems (doing otherwise would create a chicken-and-egg problem, right? :)). The only file which comes to mind is ...


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Online backup of whole partitions is a terrible idea Backing up a partition can take a long time. Internet connection can break. If that happens when you are halfway through the online backup, you will be left with a huge file of garbage. A partition to be backed up, should be unmounted. If you mount the partition and fiddle with it, you will most likely ...


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i.e. the same as the partition at the time when the backup finishes? No, you can't get a consistent backup that is fully up to date at the end, but you can get a consistent backup that represents the state of the disk at the start by using an LVM snapshot. You create a snapshot with lvcreate -s, and that gets you a new device whose contents appear to ...


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In general: when a synch fails the next time it should do a synch based on the previous successful synch or it should make a copy of the whole file. But this depends on the actual command and the software used. Use the "rsync" command and create your own solution. That way you know what it does, you can create exceptions and can put in safeguards (like ...


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4. My computer is my life! The reason you bought the computer in the first place, is... Well, the computer! You tinker, you theme, you customise, you get it just right! But is it right for a back-up? What if that last theme of yours stops you from logging into the desktop? Or that custom kernel you just downloaded freezes grub? How to install Ubuntu: ...


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5. I want the fastest possible restore!If speed of recovery and having everything exactly the way it was when you backed up is more important than the space the backup contains you can backup every drive using dd or dc3dd to create image file(s). dc3dd is preferred over dd as it provides a progress indicator. Place the image file(s) on a drive that is large ...


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This guide here explains how to launch and configure the rsync daemon on system startup. Alternatively, you can add your commands to the end of the /etc/rc.local script that is executed upon startup. By adding your commands in here it will execute them when you startup your machine. sudo nano /etc/rc.local Then type in your commands that you wan't (be ...


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I would suggest you use the rsync command to do this. Copy-pasting is not useful in case your operation fails and you need to resume at some point. Moreover, rsync can tell you what it is doing. The command would be rsync -azv --progress /old-location /new-location. If the rsync command fails for some reason, just repeat the command. Rsync will happily move ...


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We have a GUI available in Ubuntu, called 'Disks' (gnome-disk-utility) and comes default in later Ubuntu. Or sudo apt-get install gnome-disk-utility



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