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5

Create some scripts sudo nano /usr/local/bin/rsync_html #!/bin/bash /usr/bin/rsync -av --delete /var/www/html /media/stan/Seagate\ Expansion\ Drive/backups/ sudo nano /usr/local/bin/rsync_documents #!/bin/bash /usr/bin/rsync -av --delete /home/stan/documents /media/stan/Seagate\ Expansion\ Drive/backups/ sudo nano /usr/local/bin/rsync_backups ...


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I fixed this error by simply making a metadata file in .cache/deja-dup i.e., from the home directory issue the terminal command touch .cache/deja-dup/metadata dejadup-preferences is still throwing CRITICAL errors but probably unrelated to this


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It is possible to do that. HOWEVER: If the drive is actually failing, then you will eventually lose everything you put on it. If it's just the boot sector that is bad, then it should work fine. Use 'Disks' inside Ubuntu to format it with an EXT4 filesystem (or something else if you like) and it will show up just like a thumb drive. You can also use this ...


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This should be enough for your case: find . -name '*.txt' -ctime +7 | zip archive-$(date +%Y%U).zip -@ example: find . -name '*.txt' -ctime +7 | zip archive-$(date +%Y%U).zip -@ output: adding: a.txt (stored 0%) adding: b.txt (stored 0%) Now to make sure of naming: ls output is: archive-201525.zip a.txt b.txt c


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If you have installed the package from source file you need to manually remove all the files inserted into the system by the package. For future reference i would suggest you to install packages from official repositories. If for some reason you need to install from source always use checkinstall instead of make install. make install simply copies file ...


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I am not really sure what you mean by "just bootup a portable linux drive". If what you want is: hard-copy your sda2 into a usb and then eventually boot from it, it is probably possible. What you can surely do is: dd your sda2 to a key (be careful with the dd command and see here) If you want to restore: dd it back to an appropriate sized partition Boot ...


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You can back up your personal files to an external disk with normal file-copying commands (cp in a Terminal or drag-and-drop with whatever file manager you like). That's normally adequate, unless you do heavy customization of system-wide settings (in /etc). In a worst-case scenario, you'd re-install Ubuntu and then copy your personal files back. Clonezilla ...


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To keep list of packages installed in the old system, you can do : apt --installed list or dpkg --list and redirect it into some file in home filesystem. Then if you want to back-up some subdirectories in / directory, you can use tar with appropriate parameters. I recommend to back-up /etc. Also some logs in /var/log might be useful for future ...


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Backuping your root Get the root partition device, using mount : $ mount [...] /dev/sdXY on / type ext4 (rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro,data=ordered) [...] Mount it on another directory (replace /dev/sdXY using your partition): $ sudo mkdir -p /mnt/root $ sudo mount /dev/sdXY /mnt/root Copy it to another partition, without file permission changes (in ...


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Your second profile is missing a name. I'm not sure how this could happen because I double checked in BIT source and it should refuse to create a new profiles without name. Anyways, please run echo "profile2.name=Second Profile" | tee -a ~/.config/backintime/config to fix this. Edit BackInTime version 1.1.6 (planned to release next week) will avoid this by ...


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Every Hour? Little paranoid much? :P But yes. This provides a good resource if you want to backup files to external locations via the network or to external drives. If you meant backups of the entire disk I think hourly is probably a little much but you could probably do something similar with cron. To improve the answer for posterity in case the link goes ...


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You will have to have your backup folder copied to an external location, because you need the backup files to restore your data. So do that first. I recommend Dropbox or an external hard drive. Also, you can use the program Aptik (not installed by default) to backup your installed packages list and PPAs. Once you have backed up your backup data to a safe ...


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You can use this --exclude parameter to ignore files and folders. For hidden files and folders (filename or folder name starts with a .) use the parameter below: --exclude "**/.*" This means, match all files and folders which starts with a . in all folders recursively. The glob ** will recursively match all files and directories * will match any number ...



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