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3

Moderator note: This question is more or less an exact duplicate of this one, and as such you need to be extremely careful with how you do things. It is not recommend to do this. For more reasoning, see the question linked to above. Although this might be off topic but I wont care about that as the question is too straightforward and simple. Short ...


3

In my opinion, instead of "learning hacking", you should first get yourself familiar with linux basics & it's various terminal commands. If you are not familiar with linux, you would constantly have trouble following any hacking-related tutorials/videos online & even if you successfully follow them, there are high chances that you might only know the ...


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This is perfectly safe, but you want to know what you're doing. Keep in mind that you may only have four primary partitions on each disk. With one partition for XP, and three total for your Linux partitions (two regular partitions for the system and one swap partition), you have four partitions and won't be able to safely add any more. If you do wind up ...


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sh is not bash, so don't run a bash script with sh. Run it with either ./filename (requires that the script is executable, and uses the shebang) or bash ./filename (only requires the script to be readable, and the shebang is ignored). It's also not a good idea to use extensions for scripts, especially not .sh when the script is not an sh script. The script ...


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Of the options already cited: 1) Just use Backtrack in a VM - easiest, but some of the packages are relatively broken as of now and some of the packages are way out of date 2) Compile everything from source - Yes, really. This is easier than troubleshooting all the SNAFUs from adding the BT repositories. 3) Debianize everything properly to build ...


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Some of them are already available in ubuntu repos


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You might be able to copy binaries / files / libs from backtrack to Ubuntu, but, this is inadvisable for several reasons. First, it is not ideal to install packages outside of apt (your package manager). See - https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Package_management_system Although the link is for Fedora, it is a great review of the advantage of package managers. ...


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You can use nano sudo nano path/to/file You can also use gedit gksudo gedit path/to/file


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The best way wold be: Use the following command in terminal: sudo -i to get a shell where you have root privileges. Then use the following command: xdg-open /usr/share/app-install/desktop/applications.menu to open applications.menu file in your favorite text editor.


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You can't upgrade Kali(backtracks' new name) to Ubuntu. Kali is Debian Testing based.


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If Backtrack doesn't allow you to partition your HDD during installation, you can use an Ubuntu live USB, which includes Gparted, to partition it first.



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