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You might need mtpfs sudo apt-get install mtpfs


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You can perform mounts at login by using pam_mount. First install the required packages with: sudo apt-get install cifs-utils libpam-mount Then edit the "/etc/security/pam_mount.conf.xml" configuration file to declare your mounts. See my post for an example configuration and "man pam_mount.conf" for the general syntax. It will mount all shares every ...


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Thanks to the help provided, this is what I came up with. Create a script that checks if your partition is mounted, if not mount it. After the check execute calibre. %f is so that it opens only one window(more) #!/bin/bash if ! grep -q /dev/sda2 /proc/mounts; then udisksctl mount --block-device /dev/sda2 fi calibre %f Copy calibre from ...


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I use the same thing, too, like this: Exec=sh -c "udisksctl mount --block-device /dev/sda2; calibre %f" The udisksctl command does the same as if you would click on the drive in Nautilus, so it gets mounted to the standard position as your user. This way it doesn't require some sudo/root password and you are permitted to unmount it later, e.g. from ...


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OK, solved it. sec=ntlm to the options.


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You can use ntfs-config GUI utility to mount NTFS partitions in fstab. And can easily enable/disable read-write capabilities. More detailed guide: Mounting Windows Partitions in Ubuntu at Startup


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fstab is a file, found in /etc - it belongs to root so you must use sudo to edit it - it controls where all the components of the filesystem go. mkdir is just a command to create a directory. If you wanted your drive to appear as, say, ~/windows, you would want to create that directory; cd ~ ; mkdir windows You then want to find out how the system sees ...


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After long discussion, @Fabby and I agreed that this behaviour is a bug. Hence I filed a bug-report: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/gnome-session/+bug/1408129


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Add an entry to /etc/fstab, and specify the noauto mount option. Partitions without any entry are auto mounted on demand by the file manager and udisks. The noauto option prevents it from being automatically mounted at boot time.


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Use UUID instead of sdb1 or sdg1. Run `sudo blkid to find out the UUID, and change the mount line accordingly, in other words - UUID=long_number.... /media/nicholas ext4 defaults 0 0 PS: /etc/fstab should have an example of the root partition mounted by its UUID.



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