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0

Ubuntu doesn't use systemd, so x-systemd.automount won't work. I guess it is just interpreted as an invalid mount option. If you want to have your CIFS share mounted on-demand have a look at this: http://wiki.ubuntuusers.de/Autofs


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Try this: Make your script: make a new text document and put this in: #!/bin/sh mkdir -p /path/to/custom-mount sudo umount /dev/sdaX ((This is the drive you want to mount in the custom location)) sudo mount -t filesystem-type -o rw /dev/sdaX /path/to/custom-mount Put this script under /etc/init.d. Make it executable by running sudo chmod -x ...


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After fast research I think that it happens about like that: kernel notices a new device, this goes to udev (deals with devices), then to udisksd (disk manager), then via D-Bus the file manager nautilus is informed about a disk, then the filesystem is mounted with FUSE which pulls ntfs-3g userspace filesystem driver (it is in ntfs-3g package) that prints ...


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this fixed my problem sudo modprobe -r floppy source: http://www.webupd8.org/2010/05/fix-usb-devices-automount-not-working.html


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The gui only shows partitions that are mounted under /media/. Since you have them mounted under /mnt, they are not shown. Either manually change the fstab entries to mount them under /media, or remove the entries entirely and let the system automatically mount them there.


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That's because you have them mounted using fstab. If you want them to show up on the left hand side of nautilus, comment out or delete those lines from /etc/fstab and reboot. After you reboot, the partitions should appear on the left hand side and will be available under /media/<username> after you click on each partition to mount it.


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I couldn't enable automount when not in the DE. I had to do it myself in C using dbus and udisks. I followed something similar to https://github.com/Razor-qt/razor-qt.


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thanks zhongfu, this was the path to the solution. I had to change the arch-script to this to work: #!/bin/bash if [ "$2" = "up" ] then mount /Volumes/share & fi location of the script: /etc/NetworkManager/dispatcher.d/ owner: root, chmod 755 but now it works like a charm :-) BTW: it could be related to my system booting off an SSD, the ...


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I ended up putting the following lines in my .bash_aliases file: alias mountwwbp="sshfs -o nonempty wbp:/home/user /home/user/wbp-home" alias umountwwbp="fusermount -u /home/user/wbp-home"


1

Its not really a problem of whether you can do it, it is a problem of how far you are willing to compromise your encryption. From any system you can mount any encrypted partition, as you have found. But to do this you must have credentials (the password or key to decrypt it). If you want a system to be able to automatically mount something that is encrypted ...


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This happened to me when I plugged my external Seagate drive into what appeared to be a USB 3.0 port on the front of my case. Despite having a blue connector, apparently it was not actually a USB 3.0 port. I seem to have fixed the problem by plugging the drive into one of the real USB 3.0 ports on the back of my computer.


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You are simply not supposed to call mount -a unless you are init script or some other system program. Why do you need this? but yes, you can test it in shell script mountpoint -q /home/benubird/Music && echo is mounted || echo not mounted however it does not work very well with bind mounts, sou you can grep /proc/mounts instead: function ...


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In case you're looking for an answer to this remount read-only issue, an unRaid valuable article showed me the solution yesterday, after I had a very similar issue on my biggest hard drive (while already recovering the files of an silly USB key...) My logs: [40860.074298] blk_update_request: I/O error, dev sdc, sector 104869128 [40860.074306] EXT4-fs ...


1

To avoid something like this in the future, I'd recommend, that you use the blkid of the device and create a new fstab entry. E.g. (need to be root) mars ~ # sudo blkid /dev/sdb1: LABEL="backup" UUID="581df838-483f-432f-93ca-64945def428c" TYPE="xfs" Entry in fstab mars ~ # sudo nano /etc/fstab UUID="581df838-483f-432f-93ca-64945def428c" /backup xfs ...


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For some reason the empty directory is not automatically deleted after the removal of the device Therefore Remove the old mount point sudo rmdir /media/Data Remove the device and insert it again


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As there already is a folder named /media/Data the automounter creates another one named /media/Data_ as mounting point to avoid using a folder that you may have created for something else. If you remove the folder /media/Data the automounter will use /media/Data as mounting point the next time you mount your partition. Maybe you didn't properly unmount ...



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