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You can mount them automatically at system startup by adding entries to fstab. You have to take care to provide your user credentials, which can be done via a file in your home dir. Please find the details at: "Mounting cifs URL not implemented yet" when I try to mount a samba share


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Let's say your device is /dev/sdb1. Using lsusb get the ID of your device (it will be something like 0651:1722 or whatever) Create a script called script.sh in /lib/udev (you may have to use sudo while creating the file) and put the following lines in it: #!/bin/bash udisks --unmount /dev/sdb1 udisks --detach /dev/sdb Save it and make it executable ...


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Your /etc/fstab was not restored and does not contain the necessary statements to mount the partitions on your second hard drive at boot time. To do this, add the following lines to the end of your /etc/fstab: #mount /dev/sdb 1 and 2 at boot time: UUID=6A4C3AF14C3AB7A1 /media/Storage ntfs-3g defaults,noexec,windows_names,locale=en_US.utf8 0 2 ...


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As @Jos suggested, this is the bug Bug #1012081: util-linux needs updating to 2.24.2 and can be fixed by adding comment= in front of x-gvfs-show.


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The solution is to do the opposite of what you expect. The toggle for Auto-mount in Disks is broken. For some reason on is off and off is on. As you can see here is my auto-mount options for an NTFS partition. Note that it's set to OFF But it appears labelled properly in nautilus under devices with the display name of fubar and is accessible I've ...


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What I did was this: mv /bin/ntfs-3g /bin/ntfs-3g.bin and replaced it with this code: #!/bin/bash echo "ntfs:*=$@" p1=$1 echo "ntfs:p1=$p1" shift p2="$1" echo "ntfs:p2=$p2" shift echo "ntfs:1=$1" test "$1" == "-s" && shift echo "ntfs:1=$1" exec /bin/ntfs-3g.bin $p1 "$p2" $@ This seems to take care of the problem. I am devising a system where an ...


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Open your Virtualbox manager, select virtual machine. Then click on USB and create an empty filter for USB devices. They will automount. If I correctly understood your question.


1

The editing of the file is simple. Open a terminal and edit your fstab: sudo nano /etc/fstab Add a line, eg: UUID=a61d6eab-d90d-471a-8e9c-e9816b6c90cf /home ext4 defaults 0 2 Open a second terminal and run the command: sudo blkid Here is a sample output % sudo blkid /dev/sdb1: UUID="d89ae699-b2e9-4442-a292-4f27d36d3a9a" ...


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It should not be difficult to mount your drive through fstab. Since you can manually mount it, I assume you have a mount point directory for it in /media. So just add a line to fstab like: UUID=<whatever> <mountpoint> <file system> defaults 0 0 then issue the command sudo mount -a Note: you can obtain the UUID by sudo blkid



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