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Open your Network Manager and open the settings for your LAN. You should see something like this Activate the 802.1x Security and select the right authentication method, username, password and you are ready.


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First, a note about the security systems involved: sudo and gksudo are governed by sudoers, but much of the GUI uses polkit, whose configuration is independent of sudoers. There are not many common factors: Ubuntu uses the sudo group to grant administrative privileges in both systems. Both support PAM, so PAM configuration can affect both. In particular, ...


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Create a personal sudoers file: sudo -E visudo -f /etc/sudoers.d/panda -- I'm going to assume "panda" is your username. The contents are: panda ALL = NOPASSWD: /usr/bin/apt-get, /usr/bin/apt Then, you will be able to do sudo apt-get install whatever without needing to enter a password.


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I just encountered this problem. Despite having the config set correctly as is already mentioned in this thread (permissions on authorized_keys etc.), it turns out I had the public key in the wrong format. It was in the form of: ---- BEGIN SSH2 PUBLIC KEY ---- Comment: "imported-openssh-key" AAAAB3NzaC1yc2EAAAADAQABAAABAQDUoj0N3vuLpeviGvZTasGQ... ... ...


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You can all so use this code that works as well if the ones above don't work for you or you just want to see the hex output with your key. It's similar to bless hex binary editor. Windows will have their key in the usual format HAN50-0L00M-4D31T-CR4ZY. 5 letters or numbers in 5 groups. $ ls /sys/firmware/acpi/tables $ sudo hd /sys/firmware/acpi/tables/MSDM ...


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There is an app called Authenticator in the Store that does just that.


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After going through the steps above, I realized that I was creating the .ssh and authorized_keys files while logged in as root, which I didn't want to login using root. Which gave the ownership to root and also placed all the files under the root directory. I believe is the root of a lot of peoples problems with "server refused key" Changing ownership of ...


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sudo passwd hduser will let you change the password for this user


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I had the same problem today; "all of a sudden" my 14.04 wanted my password for "everything"; including (un)mount of USB sticks. I figured that I installed openssh-server in the morning. After removing it, everything is back to normal; I can insert a USB stick; and it is mounted without asking for a password. Strange. Just tried to repro; installed ...



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