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It often depends on whether you have a separate /boot partition, if you're running out of space in that partition, you'll need to clear old kernel files to make room for the new ones. The recommended way to do this is to use: sudo apt-get autoremove This should leave you with your current kernel, and the previous one as a fallback. I tend to do this after ...


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I think that the equivalent would be: apt-get --with-new-pkgs upgrade And the key is that --with-new-pkgs allow installing new packages when used in conjunction with upgrade so it basically do the same thing than aptitude safe-upgrad, install upgrades and new packages that are needed by this updates.


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The above comment did the trick for me: rm -rf /var/cache/apt/*.bin If that doesn't cut it you could also try rm -rf /var/cache/apt/*


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Turns out this is actually the expected behavior, since the version number of Xournal is now 4.8 instead of 0.4.8 (due to some sort of clerical error, I guess?), as pointed out here. This is also why 0.4.8 was "upgraded" to 4.7. Preventing the unwanted "update" may be accomplished by "holding" the package, to wit: sudo aptitude hold xournal --at least ...



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