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What you're looking for are Ubuntu Security Notifications and they are not clearly listed in the repositories. This page is the main Ubuntu Security Notifications listing. As for individual packages, updates which address security fixes are in their own special repository, the -security pocket. Using Synaptic, you can switch to the "Origin" view, and see ...


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As to answer why , refer to the file /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/01autoremove-kernels As you can see, apt is told to never autoremove the kernels , as told by another (script) file, /etc/kernel/postinst.d/apt-auto-removal. And here it is: If your script-fu is good enough you could edit it to save only couple kernels, though I can't help you there as my script ...


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Here goes oneliner: dpkg -l | grep packagename | wc -l If it results in zero, this package is not installed.


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Once you have installed a package, it is possible to see what files that package has installed on your system. You can do this: with the graphical synaptic package manager: install synaptic (it is not installed by default). Use apt-get install synaptic, or install it through Software Center. I like it better than the Software Center, but YMMV. finding ...


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apt-get remove removes the package in question apt-get purge is equivalent to apt-get remove --purge and will remove user data/configuration files. From man apt-get: purge purge is identical to remove except that packages are removed and purged (any configuration files are deleted too). and --purge Use purge instead of remove for ...


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The man page for apt-get has the following information - remove remove is identical to install except that packages are removed instead of installed. Note that removing a package leaves its configuration files on the system. If a plus sign is appended to the package name (with no intervening space), the identified ...


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I would suggest to use dpkg from the command line (shell). The good thing about it is that it is already installed on your system, because apt-get is just an extension built around dpkg. apt-get handles checking for available packages, checking for updates, downloading the packages, but dpkg is the command that actually handles the package installs, removes, ...


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To remove unresolved packages take a look here Here is how I installed youtube-to-mp3. Download your preferred architecture 32bit or 64bit. Once downloaded, just press Ctrl+Alt+T on your keyboard to open Terminal. When it opens, navigate to where the file was downloaded, probably the downloads folder, and run the command(s) below: sudo dpkg -i ...


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You can append the --assume-yes and --force-yes flags to automatically say yes to all. sudo apt-get --assume-yes --force-yes install <packagename(s)> To make these changes permanent, edit /etc/apt/apt.conf and add the lines APT::Get::Assume-Yes "true"; APT::Get::force-yes "true"; This is what the man page of apt-get says - -y, --yes, ...


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I was having the same problem. Whenever I fire perf command I got : $ perf perf_2.6.38-1208 not found You may need to install linux-tools-2.6.38-1208 But actually perf was installed by installing linux-tools package but it was with different name perf_2.6.38-16. So, I am able to use perf with perf_2.6.38-16 command instead of perf. You can create alias ...


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Try a sudo rm -r /var/lib/apt/lists/* and then run sudo apt-get update again.



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