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53

There are a number of paths that a package can take to enter Ubuntu. The overview of Ubuntu development targeted at "upstream" developers like yourself might be a useful place to start, but I'll try to give you some pointers as well. Through Debian Generally, if you are publishing free and open source software going through Debian first is the best path. ...


27

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuDevelopment/NewPackages details the normal process for including packages into Ubuntu. There are often a lot of packages awaiting review on the REVU site, which is a reason why we suggest that packages are uploaded to Debian, where they can benefit even more people. ...


18

Background Ubuntu doesn't allow upload of binary packages, but only source packages which are build by build servers. Getting your packages directly in Ubuntu repositories is not so easy. It is recommended to have it first in Debian and get it synced from there. So for now you can put it there in your PPA. You can create a PPA with your Launchpad account. ...


15

Starting with Ubuntu 10.10, it's set to host new applications that aren't in the repositories at the time of release. The process and implementation are documented on the wiki.


12

You may be confused by the language; they all mean the same, ie: "run out of" == "run in" == "installed in" (all in /opt) The exceptions are: The standard files in /usr/share/doc/<packagename> are permitted, such as copyright, changelog, and examples. The .desktop file is installed in the standard location /usr/share/applications, but must have ...


11

The clause is meant to inform you, the developer, that it is your responsibility (obligation to use that terminology) to ensure your application runs on the supported versions of Ubuntu, not Canonical's. You are not forced to test on all versions, but it is in your best interest to ensure it runs on the latest Ubuntu release and prior versions. For the ...


10

In short, you need to package your application in the Debian packaging format. If you know how to package, simply upload a tarball or a zip file with the source package. If you don't know how to package, you've got two options: If your application is a commercial app, you can upload the .jar files and Canonical will package it for you If your application ...


10

Well, first I would suggest that you put the source into a Launchpad repository. Then you can put the package in your PPA and distribute it. As for getting it included in the official repository... it really depends on the app. Per duanedesign's comment, this page can help get you started and this page can help with some common upload errors.


9

Current Situation The ARB was a session topic (Tues 6th Sept) in the recent Ubuntu App-Developers Week (5th-9th Sept). Summarising the IRC classroom (transcribed as the lesson unfolded hence the brevity and that it reflects the order of the lesson!): In future, just like paid for applications, free/libre apps will be submitted through the MyApps portal ...


6

The source code is not published for commercial or proprietary apps submitted to My Apps. You choose an application to be commercial by specifying a price, and proprietary by choosing a non-open-source license. Regarding the Python question, my guess is that you're asking because Python app packages generally install the source files. You could distribute a ...


5

It looks like you can get the status of the reviews here: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-app-review-board Of particular interest is I noticed a comment on this one: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-app-review-board/+bug/763937 It looks like the review process is taking unusually long at the moment as there was some change in the internal tools. As ...


5

It's saying that applications reviewed by the Application Review Board have to be standalone in that they can be used (and therefore tested) straight away without needing to use them as part of another application. The Application Review Board is there to test software for developers but only software that they can test. They don't want to spend hours ...


5

There are two "queues" ARB and "commercial/paid". For both the review pending stage takes the longest. This is where the submission is made into a package. If you submitted debian package source (the output of dpkg-buildpackage -S) then this stage will take a very short time. If you didn't follow instructions and submitted a binary deb the process takes MUCH ...


5

I'll also point you to Uploading your app. Ideally, you should submit a Debian source package. A Debian source package consists of 3 files (with extensions .dsc, diff.gz, orig.tar.gz), which you should put in a compressed archive (a tarball, zip file, rar...) and upload into My Apps. This will allow reviewers to easily test and publish your app. However, ...


5

The App Review Board as of now is undergoing a transition and package reviews can go at a slow pace so kindly bear with us. In the meantime, since the package is maintained in the repositories of Debian and Ubuntu, file a package upgrade request. In future, in case of any concerns regarding app development in ubuntu, please feel free to join ...


5

As a free/open source app, you essentially have two options: submit for Ubuntu Touch (http://developer.ubuntu.com/publish/apps/) and have it run on phone/tablets for now, Desktops/Laptops a bit later publish in a PPA (http://developer.ubuntu.com/publish/apps/other-forms-of-submitting-apps/ppa/) If it's a commercial app, get in touch with the Canonical ...


5

You need to use the PolicyKit APIs to request the escalation of privileges. In general, you should only do so when it's absolutely necessary, and not run the application with escalated privileges at all times. It's worth noting that if you only need root privileges on startup, you can and should start up as root, but then drop to an unprivileged user. If ...


4

When you upload your source code to Launchpad, it is being placed into the queue, depending on a point system (usually the more important the package the more points it has). As it is mentioned here: https://help.launchpad.net/Packaging/PPA/BuildingASourcePackage you have to use debuild -S and then upload your source via the .changes file that is being ...


4

Bear in mind that, as stated on the Go mobile page, what is available right now is a developer preview. There are no claims for it to be a full SDK, which it will be at some point, but not yet. In summary, what is being offered to early adopters at this point is: A set of components part of the Ubuntu UI toolkit Online (and local) API documentation for ...


4

To answer your first question, it is feasible, if time consuming. As you probably already read: Normal Ubuntu releases are supported for 18 months. Previous Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support) releases are supported for 3 years on the desktop and 5 years on the server. Starting with Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, LTS releases will be supported for 5 years on both the ...


4

Before uploading to ubuntu software center here is a guide for packing .jar into deb, It is not necessary to package your application before submitting to ubuntu software center , you can directly upload *.jar if it is closed source app , you should provide source code if it is an open source project. Canonical will package it for you Links How to get ...


4

While getting into the default Ubuntu repositories is hard and might not be right for your project (At least yet), you can set up a project in Launchpad and set up a PPA there so they can install it via PPA. More on that in the Launchpad help sections, particularly here.


4

With the coming release (10.10) we'll hopefully have a new workflow which will allow developers to make their apps available quite easily.


4

Applications can be written in whatever language/framework you want to write them in, they just need to follow the publishing requirements: Be in one, self-contained directory Be able to be installed into /opt/ Be able to be executed by all users from /opt/ Note: Users only have read and not write privileges to this directory. Write all ...


3

The process for getting your own new package included in Ubuntu is described here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuDevelopment/NewPackages


3

You need to create a SSH key and upload it into Launchpad. Instructions: Step 1: Install OpenSSH. On Ubuntu, you can install OpenSSH by opening your terminal and typing: sudo apt-get install openssh-client Step 2: Once OpenSSH is installed, stay in the terminal and type: ssh-keygen -t rsa Step 3: When prompted, press Enter to accept the default ...


3

As far as I know the contact form is your best bet. It normally takes some time to get a reply though as Canonical does not yet seem to have the capacity to answer such detailed questions quickly, but you should be able to get a response through the contact form eventually.


3

Based on his answer to this question re commercial apps, you may want to contact Michael Nelson at Canonical via IRC on freenode (nick: noodles775). Also, in general try joining channel #ubuntu-app-devel on freenode IRC and just asking, a lot of the Canonical people hang out there and someone may be able to help or at least point you in the right direction. ...


3

See Uploading your app. Ideally you should submit a .deb package. For commercial applications you can alternatively submit a .tar.gz with source code or a binary, or specify a PPA for free software.


3

I do not develop in Java, but here are a few sites that might have the answer for you. http://developer.ubuntu.com/ This would also be a good question to seek an answer for during Ubuntu Developer Week. https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuAppDeveloperWeek From my experience Java Applications get published as .jar files, but I am not sure how to make ...



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