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4

You need to learn how to package your program (no matter whether it's a script or binary executable) in the .deb format. Then you can sign up to Launchpad and create a PPA (personal package archive) where you can upload the package. Users may then add your PPA to their software sources (sudo add-apt-repository ppa:USERNAME/PPANAME && sudo apt-get ...


3

The differences might seem subtle in actual usage, but: libappindicator1 is bound via GTK2 libappindicator3-1 is bound via GTK3. There may be deeper stuff that you can look into but that should get you pointed in the right direction. Nothing to do with the version of Python. All the heavy lifting is done through GObject introspection. Oh there does seem ...


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The static libraries are likely there because you have installed one or more of the C development packages - to see exactly which, you can query the package database e.g. $ dpkg -S libm.a libc6-dev-i386: /usr/lib32/libm.a libc6-dev:amd64: /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libm.a libc6-dev-armel-cross: /usr/arm-linux-gnueabi/lib/libm.a


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Perhaps the most 'Ubuntu' way of seeing the source code for rsync, as well as seeing the Debian packaging and patching material, is to activate the sources by following (under Xenial): Dash > Software & Updates > Ubuntu Software > Source Code Ticking the 'Source Code' box and allowing the repositories to reload. Then run the following single ...


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for Ubuntu 16.04 and newer The Quickly application recommended in the accepted answer is not available in the default Ubuntu 16.04 repositories. An alternative software to Quickly is Illumination Software Creator. Version 6 of this software (the latest version) is released as a Debian package under a GPLv2 license. Illumination Software Creator allows you ...



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