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23

Apparently it is a harmless message related to a 'PCC' driver: So it looks like you build the PCC mailbox driver which is new in 3.19-rc and that driver fails to load, because it doesn't find hardware to work with. The message is harmless, but it also is not useful. The driver in question seems to be overly verbose to me in general. That is ...


18

I think you mean =Windows, not Linux. The argument tells the kernel to lie to the ACPI BIOS and tell it that it is something other than Linux (which is why specifying Linux is silly). I'm sure he means what he wrote. Yes, BIOS's usually disable functionality if Windows is not detected, but specifying Linux is not silly because by default the kernel ...


13

The parameter adds "Linux" to the list of supported operating systems that the kernel will get when it asks the BIOS "Hey, what do you support". By adding that string, later, things that use ACPI will say "hey, I have a feature that needs ACPI, and I'm running Linux - what platforms are supported?" and they'll get back a list which will include Linux. By ...


12

In general, such boot parameters are not needed unless there is a problem with your BIOS and how it handles these standards, or it just might be old enough where these standards were not fully implemented properly. ACPI (Advanced Configuration and Power Interface) is a standard for handling power management. Older systems may not support ACPI full, so ...


11

/sys/class/power_supply/BAT0 ?


10

ACPI is the Advanced Configuration and Power Interface, which allows Ubuntu (or any OS) to communicate with your hardware in a standard manner. It's main function is power management, along with hardware device configuration. A GPE in ACPI is a General Purpose Event. Think of it as an interrupt - the hardware is informing the OS (via ACPI) that something ...


10

Please add acpi=off to the kernel command line -- it's just slightly different than doing it with the LiveCD: Press the Shift when booting up, to get the Grub menu. Use the arrow keys to navigate/highlight the entry you want (usually the first one). Press e to edit that entry, which will show you the details: Find the linux entry as shown above, use ...


10

This problem (generally) doesn't arise if the slider in 'System Settings>Brightness and lock' is used. This (generally) arises when the brightness control hotkeys are used because the acpi driver, intel driver and gnome power daemon (and possibly one more) all handle the hotkeys and pass them onto the next level -seems like stupid design really. FIX 1: An ...


9

The gnome-power-manager tool listens for suspend button events, and spawns pm-suspend. Extensive detail about how pm-suspend operates can be found in the man pm-suspend command output. The quick version: /etc/pm/config.d is scanned for files that define environment variables. Each of the scripts in /etc/pm/sleep.d and /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d are called ...


9

Check your /etc/systemd/logind.conf file. It should look like this: [Login] #NAutoVTs=6 #ReserveVT=6 #KillUserProcesses=no #KillOnlyUsers= #KillExcludeUsers=root #Controllers= #ResetControllers=cpu #InhibitDelayMaxSec=5 #HandlePowerKey=poweroff #HandleSuspendKey=suspend #HandleHibernateKey=hibernate #HandleLidSwitch=suspend #PowerKeyIgnoreInhibited=no #...


8

For the time being, I do not have a clear answer for this, however it is obvious that the linux Kernel is using some energy saving mechanisms. However, doing some quick research around, I quickly realised that the most recent Linux kernels make use of a feature called ACPI which is an acronym for Advanced Configuration and Power Interface. What the ACPI ...


8

I've solved the problem through those steps: I opened the terminal and with nano opened the file below: sudo nano /etc/default/speech-dispatcher Inside the file I changed the RUN property to yes, so the file started looking like this: # Defaults for the speech-dispatcher initscript, from speech-dispatcher # Set to yes to start system wide Speech ...


7

If you're using GRUB2 (clean-installs of Ubuntu 9.04 and later), edit /etc/default/grub and change the following line: (this may look different on your system, I just took it from mine as an example) GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash nomodeset" Add noacpi, or whichever kernel option you want, anywhere in the line. If you're using GRUB Legacy (if ...


7

An operating system itself cannot bring hardware out of a completely-off state, as the OS is not running at that time. If there was any OS-level software to write to your BIOS, it would be proprietary software specific to the BIOS and motherboard etc., and highly unlikely to exist as an ubuntu command. Sorry. BIOS options such as Wake On Lan, or your auto-...


6

Battery Status is a good alternative applet that will show the battery percentage. http://www.webupd8.org/2010/11/battery-status-ppa-finally-updated-with.html Run these two commands to install a ppa for the new indicator: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:iaz/battery-status && sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install battery-status Now start the new ...


6

I have acpid (note the "D" - ACPI Daemon, not ACPI tools; those are completely different packages!) installed just for the power button - I fear that after no response, a less-knowledgeable user might go for the ATX hard power off, which cannot be handled programatically. Yes, it's a server, yes, I know what shutdown is for; however, I have no idea who will ...


6

ACPI is the actual system responsible for handling such power related tasks. Without ACPI support (either software or hardware), you won't be able to listen to the power button event. For Ubuntu installing the acpid package should be sufficient. This provides the event daemon listening for events such as pressing a power button. It is installed on regular ...


6

ACPI PPC probe failed. is related to a new ACPI interface PCC (Platform Communication Channel), which is defined by UEFI. You may see this in your output of journalctl: $ sudo journalctl Aug 16 23:10:55 x kernel: **PCCT header not found.** Aug 16 23:10:55 x kernel: **ACPI PCC probe failed.** These are the returns if the code does not find the ACPI ...


5

This is known bug that affects HP, Compaq, Dell and other manufactures. This is because of a change made in gnome-power-manager where by the estimate is done on time remaining, rather than percentage. This change does not play nice with some hardware and is why you are seeing (estimaing...) constantly. The bug report about it is here if you fancy a read: ...


5

Ryan Thompson described how the system works in an answer to my question earlier. So, you just need to change /etc/acpi/lid.sh to do whatever you want instead of blanking the screen.


5

You just need to install acpid package (sudo apt-get install acpid), its just one package, nothing more and it will handle all powerbutton events (acpi-support contains more additional packages). Tested on ubuntu server 11.10 https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-users/2011-November/253766.html


5

No, an ACPI GPE storm is not normal. Here's a line-by-line explanation of the messages you saw, along with inline solutions which may help you: ACPI FADT declares the system doesn't support PCIe ASPM, so disable it The FADT is an ACPI table containing power management info. All the message means is that your computer doesn't support PCI-Express Active ...


5

I'm pasting this in from my blog (plus some changes) as it add some context to this question. PCI Express based serial linked devices can be managed by Active State Power Management (ASPM) to extend battery life on mobile devices such as laptops and netbooks. ASPM is a power management protocol that allows an operating system's power management to place ...


5

Thanks @crysman, I believe it is indeed the bug you mentioned. To @Gully.Moy: Thanks for reporting. You wrote: I also found this thread which instructed me to edit /etc/systemd/logind.conf so that HandlePowerKey=ignore. Still no luck. That worked for me. Here's exactly what I did: Most lines in /etc/systemd/logind.conf are commented out with a ...


5

Put HandleLidSwitch=ignore under /etc/systemd/logind.conf You have to restart systemd daemon with restart systemd-logind or restart your laptop.


4

I don't think there are any limitations under that mode. All It will do Is make one of your processors work, not all of them. Basically, with nolapic it just uses one processor than the number installed.


4

Removing the lid's ability to resume from a suspended state might be helpful as a temporary hack (though is admittedly, not a solution).


4

It seems that something may be wrong with the system's ACPI table since none of the USB* devices are tied to a PCI bus. On my laptop, when I plug in my USB keyboard, I can see the pci path 0000:00:1d.0 in dmesg output: input: ... as /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1d.0/usb6/6-2/6-2.3/6-2.3:1.0/input/input14 From there I can find the ACPI device name in /proc/...


4

Ok, finally I have configured the suspend-on-lid-close action everywhere via acpid. For minimal changes to existing system wide config files (i.e. less manual overhead for the next upgrade), I did it like this: cd /etc/acpi mkdir local echo -e "#!/bin/sh\npm-suspend" > local/lid.sh.post chmod u+x local/lid.sh.post It is then automatically called by /...



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