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In general both are 64 bit capable, this is just name convention for whom architecture belongs. Actually AMD were the first to come up with a 64-bit capable x86 chip, hence at the beginning it was called AMD64, as Intel followed suit and also made their x86 chips 64-bits capable, the architecture changed name to x86_64 (even though each company have their ...


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First off, AMD64 = x86-64; they both refer to the same architecture, not sure why they used a different nomenclature. Secondly, Oracle Database 10g Instant Client for Linux AMD64 (32-bit and 64-bit) comes with two different packages available for download, while Instant Client for Linux x86-64 comes with a single package available for download. This is ...


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Fixed by creating /etc/my.cnf prior to installing MySQL only containing [mysqld] innodb_use_native_aio = 0 Source


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libcap-dev (both 32 and 64 bits) are available in Ubuntu 14.04's main repo. $ apt-cache policy libcap-dev:i386 libcap-dev:i386: Installed: (none) Candidate: 1:2.24-0ubuntu2 Version table: 1:2.24-0ubuntu2 0 500 http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty/main i386 Packages I think you have not enabled the multiarch support leading to ...


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Click the Ubuntu Symbol in the top left corner and type Software and Updates then click the Software and Updates icon that appears then choose Additional Drivers at the top right of the box. Give it time to scan your system for the drivers then choose the one that best suits you. It may take a minute to scan for the drivers so be patient.


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If you do not want to impair your system, than download the deb files an install with sudo dpkg -i your_deb_file but even that is not without risk. Preparing yourself that you could get problems.


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Install a 64 bit system. This gives you the option of upgrading your RAM at any point in the future. It also allows you to install 64 bit software which would otherwise not work on a 32 bit system.


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I've installed 32-bit versions of Ubuntu on systems with 32-bit EFIs, including both an ancient 32-bit Mac Mini and an ASUS T100. I don't have detailed documentation on how to do it, but I provide an outline in my answer to this question: 32-Bit UEFI Boot Support Either way you do it will involve significant hoop-jumping. My own preference is to stick with ...



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