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http://support.citrix.com/proddocs/topic/receiver-linux-13-0/linux-install.html It's not as simple as it should be. I can't get the Citrix Receiver Engine to always open the "launch.ica" file in Chromium, and in Firefox it is necessary to click the block at the left-hand end of the address bar and select "Allow and remember", but it's certainly much easier ...


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Get the 32-bit installer from http://boxen.math.washington.edu/home/sagemath/sage-mirror/linux/32bit/index.html or another repository. You must install 32-bit apps only on a 32-bit operating system; the original install failed because you can't install 64-bit code on a 32-bit OS.


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Pre-Installation: Make sure 'Install 3rd party software' is unchecked. This will allow the install to complete, but the wireless card will have no firmware and will therefore not function. Post-Installation: Using another mode of internet connection, locate your specific model here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WifiDocs/Driver/bcm43xx And follow the ...


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Atom text editor is currently available for Ubuntu 12.04, 14.04 and 14.10 from the Atom text editor PPA with different builds for 32-bit and 64-bit architectures. Atom text editor can be installed from the terminal by running the following commands: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/atom sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install atom For more ...


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It looks like you added the PPA using a wrong procedure. Uninstall the last PPA you installed by using the reverse procedure you used to install it and add it again using: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:TheUser/TheNameOfThePPA sudo apt-get update and only then do a: sudo apt-get install ThePackageName And the above commands would have been even more ...


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I've had some success with installing linux on this laptop. The UEFI is 32-bit, and so I had to compile a 32-bit UEFI grub to boot. The wireless card in this laptop is also unsupported currently. It's supported in android, but not in the current Broadcom linux drivers.


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Looks like the question describes not what have been created: there two partitions have been partitioned: sda1 (about 70Gb) and sda2 (about 150 Gb). All created partitions are shown by df independently on what OS(es) are installed. You can also check what your system with: sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda sudo parted /dev/sda For example, in parted you ...


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It recommends it because 64-bit is faster and today, manufacturers don’t really make 32-bit systems any more. It may also recommend 64-bit because the download site recognized that your pc is 64-bit (the one you are using to download the image). It also says 32-bit is for PC's with less than 2GB of ram because 99.9% of all PC's with less than 2GB of ram are ...


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Most modern computers come with more than 4GiB of RAM, so you'd need a 64bit OS to use all of this. (Or 32bit with PAE, which is slower) Also, most new machines are using UEFI, and Ubuntu 32bit ISO's aren't UEFI-capable, so here you'd have to go with 64bit On older hardware, which doesn't use UEFI and/or has less then 4GiB of RAM, it doesn't matter, as long ...


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Nope. These answers are wrong. You need to install bumblebee instead of NVIDIA drivers. Bumblebee is used with NVIDIA Optimus Graphic cards. Your output shows two video cards. Remove NVIDIA Drivers and install bumblebee.


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answer for question: 1- if i were you i would go for 14.04.1 because it is more stable and the update have less probability to cause your system to be unstable, also the more old is the system( especially LTS like 14.04) , the more stable it is, the more you can find answers for questions you may have in the future 2- if you decided to wipe your disk and ...


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How much storage do you have, and to spare? eg. 250GB HDD, still has 100GB unused You would be better to do a dual install (Ubuntu alongside Windows, and your existing files), but that depends on how large the drive and how much you have stored on it. Before doing anything, make sure you have a complete backup. You should use Ubuntu 14.04 LTS 32-bit. ...


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You might want to check the cpu type (changing to 64 bit is a pain after setting up, just saying), but I'd get the latest version if you don't feel you are going to leave it for a year and expect it to work just fine. 14.04 is an extended support release, while 14.10 is a normal release that receives a (don't worry, completely in-system) update every 6 ...



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