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I need to crop images often - photos, printscreens, etc., and loading gimp for such a simple task takes way too long. Can you recommend a more robust alternative?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Gthumb is a nice image viewing/editing tool with simple editing tools like cropping.

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Thanks, Gthumb looks like a solution. –  Justinas Dūdėnas Jan 22 '12 at 23:03
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Once Gthumb has opened the image: Press e > Press C > Move the selection with two mouse down-drag-up (pity, one would have been sufficient) > Click "Crop" (no shortcut afaik) > Press Ctrl+s > Press Alt+F4. Cropping images is a very common activity, so I am still looking for a program that would do this in only one mouse down-drag-up, zero key press, zero click. –  Nicolas Raoul Jan 25 '13 at 6:35
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It's horrible! I couldn't find how to crop the image for a few minutes (there's no fucking button for this and I have no idea what keys to press), and then I gave up. I don't know maybe it was usable in previous versions but the current one sucks. –  szx May 13 '13 at 6:41
    
Gthumb is a very nice IrvanView-like tool for Linux, but for some strange reason it always applies a kind of over-the-top blurring filter after croppping. Even more absurdly, it does that only after I've saved the cropped file, not in the preview. Any idea how to fix that? EDIT: scratch that - under saving options I had image smoothing at 100%. My mistake... ._. –  FuzzyQ May 22 '13 at 13:04
    
If there's cropping in Gthumb, it's impossible to find and implement. No "Crop" command on-screen or in any of the dropdown menus as of 15/04/2014, at any rate. –  mattshepherd Apr 15 at 11:19

On the command line, the tool to manipulate bitmap images is imagemagick Install imagemagick or graphicsmagick Install graphicsmagick (GM is a split of the IM project, and more actively developed). This is a good option if you often use the same parameters.

convert raw.jgp -crop 800x460+100+20               # ImageMagick
gm convert raw.jgp -crop 800x460+100+20            # GraphicsMagick

For ad hoc use where you need to see each image, you can use display (also from the ImageMagick suite) or gm display (GraphicsMagick) or Shotwell or Pinta or many other image viewers with light editing capabilities.

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isn't GM just a fork of IM? In your answer it sounds like a replacement to IM. –  math Feb 21 at 11:04
    
@math Sloppy wording on my part. For some reason I thought that GM was now in main but it is in fact still IM. Edited, thanks. –  Gilles Feb 21 at 12:58

You can crop and export pretty quickly with Shotwell, it's pre-installed. Failing that try Pinta, it's in the Software Center.

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Both do the work, but are far from graceful and fast. Closer than Gimp though, you`re right :) –  Justinas Dūdėnas Jan 22 '12 at 22:40
    
duffydack's answer might be the most lightweight program, if that's best for you. I just timed taking a screenshot, right-click & opening with Gimp, cropping and saving. It took me about 14 seconds, six of those were waiting for Gimp to open. That's pretty fast. Whatever you go with get to know the keyboard shortcuts, this will speed things up significantly. –  Tom Brossman Jan 22 '12 at 22:51
    
Speed depends on your system. Cold start gimp on this P4 1GB machine is something I don`t like to think about :) But keyboard shortcuts is the tip I`ll take. –  Justinas Dūdėnas Jan 22 '12 at 23:07

As people suggested on the Internet, try CropGUI: http://emergent.unpythonic.net/01248401946

It does just lossless JPEG cropping.

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Worth noting that the page linked to says there's only packaging for Ubuntu 8.04. That's pretty old. –  WarriorIng64 Jan 23 '12 at 7:15
    
Give CropGUI another look. It calls 'jpegtran' on the back end for lossless cropping. It has a simple installer script that cleanly put its libraries in /usr/local without a package. It puts the main program to ~/bin/cropgui, so you may want to add ~/bin/ to your path. Pull the .zip from GitHub - github.com/jepler/cropgui, unzip it, and run the installer. I recommend './install.sh -f gtk -p /usr/local/'. It preserves your original file, and creates a new file with '_crop' appended before the extension. A recent fix now preserves EXIF data. It's working really well for me. –  Royce Williams Aug 4 at 15:43
    
Also, my multi-monitor setup makes CropGUI's default screen zoom in larger than is convenient. To address this, search for 'max_' in the code and change the multiplier used for max_h and max_w from 64 to something larger (I used 128). –  Royce Williams Aug 4 at 15:51

I use mogrify on the command line.

Go to the folder you want to modify.

$ mogrify -trim *.jpg

Done. It runs very fast. I just did several thousand images in 1 second.

Resizing is quite a bit slower.

I followed up the previous command with (\> indicates to resize to maximum dimensions specified, so all images will fit within):

$ mogrify -geometry 280x280\> *.jpg

That took 8 minutes.

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How about Gwenview, which is a highly customizable and easy to use image viewer/image managing application.

  • Crop function under "Menubar -> Edit -> Crop" or crtl + k
  • Also supports simple image manipulations: rotate, mirror, flip, and resize, basic file management actions such as copy, move, delete and others.
  • It is a Lightwave Application (with MB) and can be extended using KIPI plugins.

enter image description here

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