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After dual-booting Ubuntu 11.10 successfully on another computer, I finally decided it was time for me to make the leap from Windows 7 to Ubuntu. However, the installation on my Dell Inspiron Laptop did not go as smoothly as the HP laptop I installed Ubuntu on previously.

When I began to install Ubuntu, I got past the screen where it checks that you have the laptop plugged-in, and Internet connection and etc. The deviation from the previous installation came at this point. When I installed Ubuntu last time, there was a partition tool and a recommended partition already established and I simply accepted, installed and within 30 minutes was able to boot into Ubuntu and Windows 7, it was lovely!

This time, however, I selected “Something different,” having that option and deleting the entire hard drive. I selected the 50 GB of free space and selected add partition. I even added a second partition for swap. Installation continued smoothly and Ubuntu came to life brilliantly. Only problem was, Windows 7 is nowhere to be found...

I am pretty sure I did not delete Windows, but I cannot see the Windows partition under the disk check and it does not show up under Grub. I have tried updating Grub and using command lines to generate the Grub list, but hd #'s are absent and root folders are just a series of letters and numbers.

I am not that upset over losing Windows, other than not having it available if I must use it as well as not being able to retrieve files. I appreciate any help.

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2 Answers 2

In Ubuntu, I suggest using GParted to have a look at your actual partition table to see if Windows is still hanging around. It'll be easy to see since it'll likely be the only partition running NTFS as a file system.

If you see your Windows partition, then as other answers mention, just use a Windows 7 startup repair disk and repair the MBR. I had a similar answer for this type of thing earlier here.

If its gone, well then, you can always re-install as long as your Ubuntu install isn't sitting on the 1st primary partition of your hard disk (it may be if you inadvertently wiped Windows out while installing). Windows needs to be installed on that specific partition, so if you still want to dual boot, back up any files in Ubuntu, then start over by re-installing Windows 7 first (and wiping the entire disk in the process), and following that up by installing Ubuntu once again.

Best of luck!

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Also try to use boot repair software for ubuntu

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Can you expand this to explain how? –  Eliah Kagan Jan 29 '13 at 6:30
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