Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ubuntu 10.4 LTS Encrypted Hard-drive

I recently deleted about 30 GB of files from a folder on my Desktop. After restarting however, I found that, while I cannot find the files anywhere, my computer tells me that I only have 600MiB free/Available Space.

System Monitor tells me that I have 92GiB Total, 86GiB Used, 5GiB Free and 667MiB Available (using the command df confirms this)

While Disk Usage tells me when I scan the Filesystem that it is 53GiB size, with 667MiB Available.

Why are they telling me different disk usage numbers, and how do I completely erase the 30G of files so as to get more free space? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Your files might still be in the Trash folder, open the Disk Usage Analizer with gksu baobab scan the system, and go to the folder which holds your files so you can delete them forever. –  Uri Herrera Dec 27 '11 at 22:57
    
If you simply hit the Delete button, files aren't really deleted, but moved to another folder called Trash. If you want people's opinions on disk usage, show some evidence, don't make them rely on your word alone. –  mikewhatever Dec 27 '11 at 23:02
    
I know that I deleted them, then went to the 'Wastebasket' and deleted them permanently from there too. Will Screenshots do? –  MML Dec 27 '11 at 23:25

1 Answer 1

Similar question was posted on UbuntuForums:

System Monitor gives its values in Gibibytes (no that is not a typo) whilst Nautilus/Disk Usage Monitor gives its values in Gigabytes. Two different units giving different numbers.

As to permanent deletion - open up nautilus and look at your wastebasket or trash folder and delete the items there.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Never heard of Gibibyte. Look forward to using it going forward to annoy. –  jacknad Apr 23 '12 at 15:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.