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I have a weird bug with Ubuntu 10.10 on one of my computer. When I empty the trash, the process - gvfsd-trash goes to 200% and does not stop until I kill it (using kill -9).

Does not matter if I have a 1 file or 100.

What can be the issue?

Here's a screenshot of mine (it's not 200% but it's 98%) which i think it's not normal. 98%

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2  
i have the same problem anyone knows? –  aki Dec 14 '11 at 13:04
3  
I think you should file a bug on Launchpad (and link to this question here in the bug description). Does it hapen also with an empty trash bin? What about other users on the same machine? –  lumbric Dec 21 '11 at 16:30
    
Cool! but annoying. –  Alvar Jan 16 '12 at 12:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+150

I had the same issue and I created an applet. This way i simply did rm -rf the trash folder. I also added a "shred" option - which is configurable.

this way more secure.

here's a example of applet code: http://conjurecode.com/create-indicator-applet-for-ubuntu-unity-with-python/

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After updating to 13.04 gvfsd-trash used 100 % IO according to the terminal program iotop. Running rm -rf ~/.local/share/Trash and rebooting the computer solved it. –  Daniel Jonsson May 2 '13 at 6:57
    
@DanielJonsson Thanks, I haven't updated since 12.04. I'll take a note;) –  lasers Jun 11 '13 at 1:36

Try what is on this e-how page: http://www.ehow.com/how_8219428_empty-trash-can-through-terminal.html, then let me know if it emptied this way. Also, when you end the process, is the file deleted? If not, doing what is in that link may fix it, as it could be that a file does not want to be deleted (in non-geek terms). Hope this helps!

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