Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to configure bind9 using the Ubuntu terminal to have the DNS resolve a local name, not a domain name.

For example, if I type in Nicole it will resolve my IP address in a local network fashion.

How can I do this, step-by-step please?

I've already installed bind9 using:

sudo apt-get install bind9

It's fully installed now, I just need some help configuring.

Should I be using local views?

I am going to do the connection with two laptops probably connected to each other by Ethernet cable or WIFI. One of them is running Ubuntu and the other is running Windows. I not sure if that's part of the problem.

share|improve this question

migrated from stackoverflow.com Nov 26 '11 at 17:00

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

    
[Bind9 configuration with hostname step by step][1] [1]: askubuntu.com/questions/330148/… –  Artemis Aug 8 '13 at 15:38

2 Answers 2

If you want to connect only 2 machines, I think easier and better using local hosts files instead of DNS.

Make the router DHCP give always the same IP to the machines (or use fixed IP instead of DHCP). On the ubuntu machine, you can edit the file with sudo nano /etc/hosts and add a line like 192.168.xxx.xxx <the_other_computer_name> where the IP is the local IP of the other computer and another line similar with the local machine name and IP.

Do the same on the windows machine (the host file is \windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts)

share|improve this answer
1  
You usually would configure manual addressing on each client. I agree that if the goal is simply to have each machine resolve the other's name, using hosts files would be a much simpler and more practical approach. Using bind9 for this only makes sense if your goal is to learn to configure bind9; it's way more tool than you need for the job described. –  bgvaughan Nov 26 '11 at 18:30
    
Another benefit of using hosts files is that those machines are notebooks and have a great chance of connecting to other networks. This way you won't have problems with the machines trying to use your "local" DNS when it is not available on the network you're connected. –  laurent Nov 26 '11 at 21:51

If you are trying to learn about using Bind9 and would like to still set it up I would recommend that you follow this post in the Ubuntu Forums.

share|improve this answer
    
If you find it useful, we can add more content here. –  itnet7 Nov 26 '11 at 17:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.