Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
What IDEs are available for Ubuntu?

I know that asking for something like Visual Studio is too much but something that will let me write, debug and compile in a GUI instead of the command line is good enough for me. (Not that I'm lazy, but I don't have time to learn the necessary commands...)

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Christopher Kyle Horton, Ringtail, Mitch, Anwar Shah, Tom Brossman Sep 16 '12 at 8:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

15 Answers 15

up vote 25 down vote accepted

codeblocks Install X

sudo apt-get install codeblocks

alt text

Wikipedia: Code:Blocks

share|improve this answer

CodeLite Install codelite

alt text

More screenshots -> http://codelite.org/gallery.php

As for me CodeLite is the best replacement for Visual Studio

share|improve this answer

qtcreator Install qtcreator

I am really surprised because none of you mentioned QT Creator it is the best c/c++ IDE available for Ubuntu.

Qt Creator is a cross-platform C++ integrated development environment which is part of the Qt SDK[2]. It includes a visual debugger and an integrated GUI layout and forms designer. The editor's features includes syntax highlighting and autocompletion, but not tabs. Qt Creator uses the C++ compiler from the GNU Compiler Collection on Linux and FreeBSD. On Windows it can use MinGW or MSVC with the default install and can also use cdb when compiled from source.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

vim Install vim

Vim is also a good choice for writing C programs.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Anjuta DevStudio Install anjuta

It's package name is anjuta.

sudo apt-get install anjuta
share|improve this answer

Emacs

Emacs allows you to compile and debug inside the GUI. With CEDET package, it has got nice code completion for C and C++ projects. Color theme will give nice themes and syntax coloring for the source code. Emacs can be customized heavily using the e-lisp.

Emacs running with CEDET and color theme showing code completion.

Also refer to Ubuntu Community Help Wiki for EmacsHowto.

Emacs running with CEDET and color theme

share|improve this answer
    
ECB is an Emacs package that provides the browsing features and side panes that other IDEs have -- check out the sample screenshots for a visual explanation. –  Riccardo Murri Oct 19 '10 at 8:47
3  
Also, unlike many IDEs that specialize in one or a few languages, Emacs provides good editing support for almost anything that has a text format, so you can use it for easier integrated editing all the files that comprise a program distribution. –  Riccardo Murri Oct 19 '10 at 8:52

KDevelop Install kdevelop

I very highly recommend KDevelop. It's a KDE program (cough KDE > gnome =P), but it will work under gnome. It's like a color explosion. Pretty much every single variable, class, method, language construct, etc has a different color. Not just local variables one color, global another etc. Every local variable will have a different color from each other.

It also integrates with cmake extremely well and is generally a great IDE to work with. I really wish there was a java and/or python plugin for it.

alt text

share|improve this answer

Eclipse Install eclipse

Just for completeness i can suggest you have a look at eclipse:

sudo apt-get install eclipse

which can handle just about any language you like with the right plugin, but in my opinion better options have already been mentioned in this list.

share|improve this answer

netbeans Install X

sudo apt-get install netbeans

enter image description here

Wikipedia: Netbeans

share|improve this answer
    
Netbeans font is ugly on Ubuntu and that screenshot is from windows ;) –  Achu Feb 14 '12 at 18:57

Sublime Text 2

I recommend Sublime Text 2. It is not free but worth every cent.

Sublime Text 2 may be downloaded and evaluated for free, however a license must be purchased for continued use. There is currently no enforced time limit for the evaluation.

enter image description here

It features a plethora of useful features and is highly extensible.

share|improve this answer

Geany geany

is a text editor using the GTK2 toolkit with basic features of an integrated development environment. It was developed to provide a small and fast IDE, which has only a few dependencies from other packages. It supports many filetypes and has some nice features.

alt text

share|improve this answer
    
I like geany mostly because its the only free editor that feels most like my favorite non-free editor, SlickEdit. Searching is a big deal to me, SlickEdit does it best, Geany's not too bad. –  KFro Oct 19 '10 at 3:35

One more good editor and awarded is Komodo Edit. You can use it with a lot languagies c, c++, python and more. Is free and croos platform.

http://www.activestate.com/komodo-edit

There is a Komodo IDE but it is commercial. But you can try it with a trial version.

http://www.activestate.com/komodo-ide

enter image description here

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Anjuta anjuta

Anjuta DevStudio is a versatile software development studio featuring a number of advanced programming facilities including project management, application wizard, interactive debugger, source editor, version control, GUI designer, profiler and many more tools. It focuses on providing simple and usable user interface, yet powerful for efficient development.

alt text

share|improve this answer

MonoDevelop Install monodevelop

If you like Visual Studio, you will certainly like MonoDevelop. You can find it in the software center. You can even write .NET apps with it if you want to (like C# as you can see in the screenshot), but I suggest you don't ;)

MonoDevelop

share|improve this answer
    
Why do you suggest not to write C# apps ? –  Anthony Nov 1 '10 at 1:22
1  
If you are able to write an application in native code, like C or C++, I think it is always better to do so. Using a framework like .NET always has a small impact on performance, so it might be better to avoid it. Mono is great to make it easier for porting Windows apps to Linux, but when developing native applications for Linux I personally would rather use open-source technologies. –  W. Goeman Nov 1 '10 at 19:23
    
leave mono debate out of this please. Mono is Open Source. –  RolandiXor Jun 12 '11 at 0:51

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.