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Im trying to rezize my external 500gb portable hdd but i cant... i get the follwing in gparted

GParted 0.8.1 --enable-libparted-dmraid

Libparted 2.3
Shrink /dev/sdb1 from 465.73 GiB to 444.31 GiB  00:00:40    ( ERROR )

calibrate /dev/sdb1  00:00:00    ( SUCCESS )

path: /dev/sdb1
start: 63
end: 976707583
size: 976707521 (465.73 GiB)
check file system on /dev/sdb1 for errors and (if possible) fix them  00:00:10    ( SUCCESS )

ntfsresize -P -i -f -v /dev/sdb1

ntfsresize v2011.4.12AR.4 (libntfs-3g)
Device name : /dev/sdb1
NTFS volume version: 3.1
Cluster size : 4096 bytes
Current volume size: 500074246656 bytes (500075 MB)
Current device size: 500074250752 bytes (500075 MB)
Checking for bad sectors ...
Checking filesystem consistency ...
Accounting clusters ...
Space in use : 405632 MB (81.1%)
Collecting resizing constraints ...
Estimating smallest shrunken size supported ...
File feature Last used at By inode
$MFT : 475063 MB 0
Multi-Record : 494172 MB 30165
$MFTMirr : 250037 MB 1
Sparse : 454633 MB 35
Ordinary : 500067 MB 153160
You might resize at 405631090688 bytes or 405632 MB (freeing 94443 MB).
Please make a test run using both the -n and -s options before real resizing!
shrink file system  00:00:20    ( ERROR )

run simulation  00:00:10    ( SUCCESS )

ntfsresize -P --force /dev/sdb1 -s 477071639039 --no-action

ntfsresize v2011.4.12AR.4 (libntfs-3g)
Device name : /dev/sdb1
NTFS volume version: 3.1
Cluster size : 4096 bytes
Current volume size: 500074246656 bytes (500075 MB)
Current device size: 500074250752 bytes (500075 MB)
New volume size : 477071634944 bytes (477072 MB)
Checking filesystem consistency ...
Accounting clusters ...
Space in use : 405632 MB (81.1%)
Collecting resizing constraints ...
Needed relocations : 92761 (380 MB)
Schedule chkdsk for NTFS consistency check at Windows boot time ...
Resetting $LogFile ... (this might take a while)
Relocating needed data ...
Updating $BadClust file ...
Updating $Bitmap file ...
Updating Boot record ...
The read-only test run ended successfully.
real resize  00:00:10    ( ERROR )

ntfsresize -P --force /dev/sdb1 -s 477071639039

ntfsresize v2011.4.12AR.4 (libntfs-3g)
Device name : /dev/sdb1
NTFS volume version: 3.1
Cluster size : 4096 bytes
Current volume size: 500074246656 bytes (500075 MB)
Current device size: 500074250752 bytes (500075 MB)
New volume size : 477071634944 bytes (477072 MB)
Checking filesystem consistency ...
Accounting clusters ...
Space in use : 405632 MB (81.1%)
Collecting resizing constraints ...
Needed relocations : 92761 (380 MB)
WARNING: Every sanity check passed and only the dangerous operations left.
Make sure that important data has been backed up! Power outage or computer
crash may result major data loss!
Are you sure you want to proceed (y/[n])? OK quitting. NO CHANGES have been made to your NTFS volume.
check file system on /dev/sdb1 for errors and (if possible) fix them  00:00:09    ( SUCCESS )

ntfsresize -P -i -f -v /dev/sdb1

ntfsresize v2011.4.12AR.4 (libntfs-3g)
Device name : /dev/sdb1
NTFS volume version: 3.1
Cluster size : 4096 bytes
Current volume size: 500074246656 bytes (500075 MB)
Current device size: 500074250752 bytes (500075 MB)
Checking for bad sectors ...
Checking filesystem consistency ...
Accounting clusters ...
Space in use : 405632 MB (81.1%)
Collecting resizing constraints ...
Estimating smallest shrunken size supported ...
File feature Last used at By inode
$MFT : 475063 MB 0
Multi-Record : 494172 MB 30165
$MFTMirr : 250037 MB 1
Sparse : 454633 MB 35
Ordinary : 500067 MB 153160
You might resize at 405631090688 bytes or 405632 MB (freeing 94443 MB).
Please make a test run using both the -n and -s options before real resizing!
grow file system to fill the partition  00:00:01    ( SUCCESS )

run simulation  00:00:01    ( SUCCESS )

ntfsresize -P --force /dev/sdb1 --no-action

ntfsresize v2011.4.12AR.4 (libntfs-3g)
Device name : /dev/sdb1
NTFS volume version: 3.1
Cluster size : 4096 bytes
Current volume size: 500074246656 bytes (500075 MB)
Current device size: 500074250752 bytes (500075 MB)
New volume size : 500074246656 bytes (500075 MB)
Nothing to do: NTFS volume size is already OK.
real resize  00:00:00    ( SUCCESS )

ntfsresize -P --force /dev/sdb1

ntfsresize v2011.4.12AR.4 (libntfs-3g)
Device name : /dev/sdb1
NTFS volume version: 3.1
Cluster size : 4096 bytes
Current volume size: 500074246656 bytes (500075 MB)
Current device size: 500074250752 bytes (500075 MB)
New volume size : 500074246656 bytes (500075 MB)
Nothing to do: NTFS volume size is already OK.

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2 Answers

WARNING: Every sanity check passed and only the dangerous operations left. Make sure that important data has been backed up! Power outage or computer crash may result major data loss!

Are you sure you want to proceed (y/[n])?

OK quitting. NO CHANGES have been made to your NTFS volume.

It looks like you were given a warning and you aborted the resize. Is that the case?

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Your drive reports that it is 81.1% in use and nearly full:

Device name : /dev/sdb1
NTFS volume version: 3.1
Cluster size : 4096 bytes
Current volume size: 500074246656 bytes (500075 MB)
Current device size: 500074250752 bytes (500075 MB)
Checking for bad sectors ...
Checking filesystem consistency ...
Accounting clusters ...
Space in use : 405632 MB (81.1%)

Also, the code keeps advising you to perform the following actions:

Please make a test run using both the -n and -s options before real resizing!

Which might be worthwhile as well, not certain that was done, though do see the - s in use, it appears that a - - force is attempted instead.

Not sure what value will be gained by resizing partitions on the hard drive when it is this full. You might want to compress some of the files on the drive first before attempting to resize and repartition the drive as that may gain more valuable space available to perform the desired real estate for resizing rather than trying to use limited space for a repartition.

HTH. Have a nice day. :)

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