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i read about logging into remote systems using ssh without entering password; and i've established in my system and is working pretty awesome.

now the problem occurs when it comes to a local network, where several systems are present, to anyone of which i can log in (where my account is mounted from another file server). the range of ips for them is 10.10.6.1-50.

after logging into anyone of these systems i need to log in to another remote system (which is in the lab, ip = 10.10.7.80, where the user id is different). so when i try to log in to the lab system from any of these 50 systems, it is implied that i need to export the public keys from all of those 50 systems (which, of course, is a tedious thing to do). so, can i fix this using the ip range? (other than copying and pasting the ids for all the 50 systems to 'authorized keys') if so, how?

ps: i don't have the sudo permissions.

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I cannot understand your question: if your 50 systems are sharing the home directory, then you are using one and the same keypair on all these systems. Hence, there's only one public key to add to the lab computer's authorized_keys. Where's the problem? –  Riccardo Murri Nov 5 '11 at 15:22
    
i did that, but in the end it is like pop@system1. where system1 = system name (for 10.10.6.1), not the ip (and the system1 is not the file server either). i tried replacing system1 by some syntaxes like 10.10.6. and nothing worked. so, basically i have no idea what keyword to be put there in order to represent all the 50 systems. –  Population Xplosive Nov 5 '11 at 15:33
    
The last part of the public key are just a comment string for humans to read and is ignored by SSH. (This comment string is usually = to the account@machine where you generated the keypair.) –  Riccardo Murri Nov 5 '11 at 15:37

1 Answer 1

If your 50 systems are sharing the home directory, then you are using one and the same SSH keypair on all of them. Hence, there's only one public key to add to the lab computer's authorized_keys.

For more information on SSH keys and how to set them up, see: http://pkeck.myweb.uga.edu/ssh/

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that's true, i knew that. the problem is the name of the host. all the 50 systems have 50 names, like system1, system2, ... etc. while editing the authorized_keys i was trying to see if there's a single way to represent all the 50 systems (it was like ssh-rsa AAA..... = user@system1. i didn't want to copy and paste it 49 times and change system1 to other names also) in a single go. i also tried giving the ip of the file server. but, then i could login only from the file server. –  Population Xplosive Nov 7 '11 at 3:55

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