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I'm using Lubuntu 11.10. That's great, but sometimes I miss Ubuntu's eye-candy. I can install Ubuntu 'as a layer' on Lubuntu, so I'll be able to choose the 'layer' in the login screen. But doing this will leave typical Ubuntu stuff on my Lubuntu install as well, which bothers me: I want to keep the Lubuntu install clean.

I've booted Ubuntu 11.10 from a live USB, and then tried to install it 'alongside' Lubuntu (so I could choose the right operating system in GRUB). But this option doesn't show up. I'm not an expert at using the advanced installing mode, but this could be the key to get this done.

So, my question is: How can I install Ubuntu alongside Lubuntu, without changing the Lubuntu setup?

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By "boot menu", do you mean GRUB or the login screen? I'm assuming you mean the latter unless you clarify. –  WarriorIng64 Nov 4 '11 at 0:37
    
I mean the latter, thanks for noticing. –  Exeleration-G Nov 4 '11 at 9:13
    
Firstly, Ubuntu is not a "layer" over Lubuntu. You've just been running one or the other desktop environments. You asked how to install both so you can select from grub, but this seems like overkill to me. You should just install them on the same partition and select desktop environment from the display manager (login screen) instead. Then since they share some packages, you won't need to install/update these twice. Also, both will share custom /usr /etc /var etc. files. Hence, install one first, then install the other with your package manager (as Nituz94 suggests). –  Sparhawk Dec 30 '12 at 9:02
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I just re-read your question and realise you don't want exactly what I just said. I personally think that the negatives from separating the desktop environments far outweighs the positives, but to each their own. :) –  Sparhawk Dec 30 '12 at 9:20
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is a dual-boot guide on the Ubuntu Documentation pages. You can replace the word Windows with Ubuntu, so that you end up dual-booting Ubuntu and Lubuntu.

  1. When you reach the partitioner, select "Advanced Partitioning" or "Manual Partitioning".
  2. You will get a list of the partitions on your system.
  3. You need to have free space on your hard disk to install Ubuntu. So, there are two ways that you can free up some space. Either you delete some partitions (that you do not need any more) or you can shrink your existing partitions (so that some space gets freed up). I am assuming that you will shrink your partitions.
  4. Select the partition you want to resize and click on 'Shrink'. If you are unsure as to which one to use, then I suggest that you resize your '/' or root partition, i.e., the partition that is mounted under '/' symbol. Select "Size:", press Enter. Type in a new size for your partition. It's recommended you free up at least 10 GB + your RAM size * 2 of free space for your Ubuntu install. Press Enter when happy with your changes. It may take some time to apply the changes.
  5. Create a swap partition of at least twice the amount of your RAM (your RAM size * 2) (if you don't know, 2048 MB is a good value). To do this, select the free space, then click on 'Add'. Enter the size and then select type as 'Swap'. Press 'OK'.
  6. Create a partition for your Ubuntu installation. To do this, select the free space, click on 'Add'. Select the type as 'Ext4' and the mount point as '/'.
  7. Select "Finish partitioning and write changes to disk".
  8. Continue with the installation.
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This worked. Thank you. –  Exeleration-G Nov 7 '11 at 22:11
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you don't need to dual boot. Simply install the ubunutu desktop and applications you want for your eye candy.

use :

sudo apt-get install ubuntu-desktop
sudo apt-get install compiz
sudo apt-get instal compiz-extras


you should be able to select which desktop you want at the login of Lubunutu. Its located in the same drop down menu at the netbook and open box. You can do this with any desktop version on linux if you wanted

hope that helps

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Quite a few typos in this command... –  Sparhawk Dec 30 '12 at 9:09
    
still typos, and I'm not even sure it's correct. e.g. ubuntu-desktop depends on unity depends on compiz, so there's at least some redundancy there. Can we have a source? –  Sparhawk Dec 30 '12 at 20:48
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