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Is it possible to install Ubuntu 10.04 on ext3 instead of ext4?

This is because I want to use my backup program "Acronis" to save an image of the whole partition.

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Well it did not work. –  Eyvind Nov 4 '11 at 14:50

2 Answers 2

Yes it is possible just change it because ext4 is the default

I think all Acronis product work with the follow file system for example Acronis® True Image™ Home 2012 but Acronis® Disk Director® 11 Home doesn't support ext4.

Why use Acronis when there's Clonezilla or G4l? Has many more features and is open source

If you’re a Linux user, you’ve likely been asked at some point if you want Ext3, Ext4, XFS, ReiserFS, Btrfs, or one of many other filesystem acronyms. This choice confuses new and old users alike, and like all software, the options change as technology improves. Many people probably don’t care what filesystem they use as long as it’s stable and reasonably fast, but how do you know which one that is? This guide will attempt to cover the basic differences between the most common options, and provide the pros and cons of each choice.

Ext2

Ext2 is Linux’s “old standby” filesystem. It was the default for most of the major early Linux distributions. While it has been mostly supplanted by versions 3 and 4, ext2 is still popular on USB and other solid-state devices. This is because it does not have a journaling function, so it generally makes fewer reads and writes to the drive, effectively extending the life of the device.

Recommended Use: USB/Solid State Drives, or any cause where you need high stability with minimal reads/writes.

Ext3

The most notable difference between ext2 and ext3 was the introduction of journaling. In short, journaling filesystems are meant to recover more gracefully in the event of a system crash. Whenever you find yourself in doubt about which filesystem to use for Linux, ext3 is nearly always a good bet. It’s extremely mature, extremely well supported, and contains all the features you’re likely to need for a desktop OS.

Recommended Use: If you have no specific reason for another filesystem, ext3 is an excellent default.

Ext4

The most recent in the ext filesystem line, ext4 includes many major improvements over ext3 like larger filesystem support, faster checking, nanosecond timestamps, and verification of the journal through checksums. It’s backward and forward compatible with versions 2 and 3, so you can mount a ext2 or ext3 filesystem as ext4, and the other way around. You may however lose some of the benefits of the newer versions when mounting as the older. Many of the modern Linux distributions now offer ext4 during the install, and some are using it as the default.

Recommended Use: Ext4 should be stable enough for desktop and server needs. If your distribution offers it as an install choice, it should be a good choice for nearly any usage needs.

ReiserFS (Reiser3)

Before ext3, ReiserFS was the only journaling filesystem for Linux. It’s also notable for allowing live resizing of the filesystem. In some cases where many small files are involved, Reiserfs can outperform ext3 by a considerable margin. Reiser3 has problems, however when it comes to handling things like multicore PCs, as the design only allows for some operations to run one at a time.

Recommended Use: Interacting with small files on a single core system.

Reiser4

Reiser4 is intended to solve some of the problems with the Reiser3 implementation. Performance has improved, particularly with small files, and it includes support for plugins to handle things like compression and encryption. Reiser4 has a somewhat uncertain future. It has not yet been accepted into the main line Linux kernel, the lead designer is in prison, and the company developing it is not currently in business. Reiser4, if completed and fully polished, could be a fast and useful filesystem, but until it gains a foothold in the mainline kernel it may not be a good choice for long term use.

Recommended Use: Filesystem testing and development

XFS

XFS is packed full of cool features like guaranteed rate I/O, online resizing, built-in quota enforcement, and it can theoretically support filesystems up to 8 exabytes in size. It’s been used on Linux since about 2001, and is available as an install option on many popular Linux distributions. With variable block sizes, you can tune your system like a sliding scale to tweak for space efficiency or read performance.

Recommended Use: If you really like to tweak your system to meet your needs, XFS is a great way to go.

Btrfs

Btrfs Some of the interesting features include transparent compression, snapshots, cloning, and in-place conversion (with rollback) from ext3 and 4. According to the lead developer, Btrfs aims to “let Linux scale for the storage that will be available.” Btrfs, once completed and matured, will likely be a strong contender in the Linux filesystem world on both desktops and servers.

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Well it did not work. The install with ext3 was ok. –  Eyvind Nov 4 '11 at 14:52
    
But Acronis can not backup ext3 file system eider. I all ready got different type of Clonezilla.........it wil not work for me. Every time i come to the chose were to put the image file I fail, and have to reinstall the OS Exs. I got tre partitions on a pendrive One for OS One for swap One for the image with a map inside named backup What do to make an image in this map. –  Eyvind Nov 4 '11 at 15:09

On this site https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LucidLynx/ReleaseNotes you can see that ext3 even may improve your system performance. (Read the chapter "Performance regressions with ext4 under certain workloads")

Just manually partition your root partition as ext3 when installing Ubuntu 10.04.

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Thank you very much. :) –  Eyvind Nov 1 '11 at 11:12

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