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Dell XPS 15z

Found this: ubuntu hardware support 15z

Have been able to get ubuntu booted up off usb with acpi=off. My question is, once Ive installed and my boot line includes either 'acpi=off' or 'acpi=noirq' will i ruin my hardware running this as my daily driver?

being a noob about three years ago i started running backtrack 3,4 on my vostro 1500... and let me tell you, its hardware is COOKED. hence why i had to buy new system. not trying to make same mistake.

I JUST WANT LINUX

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Can you explain how kernel settings can cook hardware? –  Sergey Nov 1 '11 at 0:58
    
'Power Interface' - lead me to believe it may have something to do with power management... such as the computer running so hot or the fan running full blast –  cory Nov 1 '11 at 1:34
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2 Answers 2

Probably not. See http://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt which says:

acpi=       [HW,ACPI,X86]
        Advanced Configuration and Power Interface
        Format: { force | off | strict | noirq | rsdt }
        force -- enable ACPI if default was off
        off -- disable ACPI if default was on
        noirq -- do not use ACPI for IRQ routing
        strict -- Be less tolerant of platforms that are not
            strictly ACPI specification compliant.
        rsdt -- prefer RSDT over (default) XSDT
        copy_dsdt -- copy DSDT to memory

        See also Documentation/power/pm.txt, pci=noacpi

Looks harmless to me

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if your machine uses ACPI...

cat /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/THM0/temperature

echo level auto > /proc/acpi/ibm/fan

seems like if no acpi, fan runs full blast, cpu gets hot, and then, i think, non stop hot hardware means less life.

no?

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