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I, along with many others, have been experiencing a problem with our Ubuntu 11.10 installations on our battery-powered laptop devices: The computer misreads information from the battery, so it thinks the battery will only last a few minutes. I get a critically low message ~85% battery level. Can someone help me?

Here is the link to the whole situation showing all the details and terminal messages on the Ubuntu Forums: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1865832

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

People who had same problem I installed Jupiter for them that tend to solve the problem of critical low level of battery in laptops. If you are experiencing such a critical battery level then you can try the following:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/jupiter
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install jupiter

Thank you.

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From fix/workaround found in this thread.

For 11.04 and older just run:

gconftool-2 --type bool --set /apps/gnome-power-manager/general/use_time_for_policy false

For 11.10 run:

gsettings set org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.power 'use-time-for-policy' 'false'

This worked for me. It doesn't fix my underlying issue, but it keeps my laptop from continuously suspending.

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For the underlying issue follow this thread in launchpad. –  Gus E Nov 1 '11 at 12:25

In Ubuntu 12.04, Lenovo Ideapad S400. I finally found what worked for me. Take a look at http://askubuntu.com/questions/92794...-battery-value. It says:

Start dconf-editor. Browse to org->gnome->settings-daemon->plugins->power. Change the values of percentage-critical and percentage-action to the level you require. And change use-time-for-policy to false

I just had to install dconf through Ubuntu Software Center to find the way. All the percentages were ok. I turned use-time-for-policy to false and restarted the session. Working fine now. Enjoy... it is always good to remove Windows from a computer.

By the way, before I intended to remove Windows (it is my 77-year-old, mother-in-law computer) after it gets 1060 viruses of 15 different kinds in the first week of use, I called Lenovo in Brazil asking them about warranty. To my surprise, I was told that Windows removal voids warranty... I must return to windows if I need that. You know what? I don't mind. Ubuntu is already installed and, except for this small battery glitch, it seems to recognize all peripherals ok.

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