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In Nautilus 2, when I copy a link file from A to B, it simply copy the link and I think it is a good idea.

However, now I upgrade to Nautilus 3 and do the same thing, I found that Nautilus doesn't copy the link, infact it copies the original source file.

I am very strange about this change. The main reason I use link file is to save disk space. For example, I have a large data file, about 1G. And I would use it in many different directories for analysis. Previously I would creat a soft link and then copy the link to other directories, very convenient. However, nowadays if I click "copy" on the soft link, Nautilus would copy the whole 1G file, WOW!

Later I've found that this problem only happens in remote server directory. While in local directory, it copies the link only. I've tried to set alias : cp='cp -P' both on my local and server .bashrc, but no effects

What can I do?

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And strange, I add alias cp='cp -P', it would copy only link in local directory. However it copies the original file yet in the remote server directory. What's the difference? –  billzt Oct 18 '11 at 3:22
    
Are you copying across partitions? Becauses nautilus just copies the links for me. –  Capt.Nemo Oct 18 '11 at 5:47
    
No, I copy files in the same partition. Now the problem happens only in remote server directory –  billzt Oct 18 '11 at 6:18
    
Could you update the question with new specifications. –  Capt.Nemo Oct 18 '11 at 6:19
    
This question appears to be abandoned, if you are experiencing a similar issue please ask a new question with details pertaining to your problem. If you feel this question is not abandoned, please flag the question explaining that. I am flagging this for closure :) –  Ringtail Feb 29 '12 at 0:39
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closed as too localized by jrg Feb 29 '12 at 0:56

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